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Article

George Kofi Amoako, Emmanuel Kotey Neequaye, Solomon G. Kutu-Adu, Livingstone Divine Caesar and Kwame Simpe Ofori

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how relationship marketing practice can lead to customer satisfaction in the current practices in the hotel industry in Ghana…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how relationship marketing practice can lead to customer satisfaction in the current practices in the hotel industry in Ghana. Globally, the hospitality industry ranks as one of the most competitive business sectors with competing organisations relying on a cocktail of strategies such as relationship marketing to stay relevant, and attract and retain customers. This paper examines how relationship marketing impacts on trust, commitment and satisfaction for customers in the Ghanaian hospitality industry.

Design/methodology/approach

A positivist methodological framework was used for the collection of data, analysis and theoretical development in this research. The data collection questionnaire was administered to 167 guests of a 3-star hotel in the Accra Metropolis. Structural equation modelling was used to ascertain the significance of the relationship that exists between trust, commitment and customer satisfaction with respect to the relationship marketing practices of hoteliers in Ghana.

Findings

Study findings provide insight into the processes and practices of relationship marketing that is based on trust and commitment. The findings show a positive and significant relationship between trust, commitment and customer satisfaction. The study also revealed that commitment partially mediates the association between trust and customer satisfaction.

Research limitations/implications

While this study is limited to a single hospitality and tourism company in Ghana, the findings can have far reaching implications for managers in the hospitality industry in Ghana, it provides a vivid illustration of the impact that customer satisfaction can have on the fortunes of business and a genuine desire to develop trust and be committed to the welfare of business clients can lead to higher customer patronage.

Practical implications

Trust and commitment in the hospitality industry requires innovative business practices that makes the client value all the service experience that he or she may encounter. The findings indicate that customer satisfaction is influenced by trust and commitment in the hospitality industry.

Originality/value

Value to the authors’ knowledge, the relationship between trust and commitment in relationship marketing and customer satisfaction concepts has not previously been investigated using structural equation modelling analysis within the Ghanaian hospitality industry. This implies that both trust and commitment are necessary to attain customer satisfaction.

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Insights, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9792

Keywords

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Article

George Oppong Appiagyei Ampong, Aidatu Abubakari, Majeed Mohammed, Esther Theresa Appaw-Agbola, John Agyekum Addae and Kwame Simpe Ofori

The study sought to assess the nexus between components of perceived justice and satisfaction, trust and loyalty with service recovery.

Abstract

Purpose

The study sought to assess the nexus between components of perceived justice and satisfaction, trust and loyalty with service recovery.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data were gathered from a sample of 300 clients from 8 midscale hotels in Ghana. Partial least squares structural equation modeling was used to test the hypothesized relationships.

Findings

Perceived distributive justice has no effect on customer satisfaction with service recovery. Interactional justice had the greatest effect on customer satisfaction with service recovery. No significant relationship was found between procedural justice and trust. Also, trust had a significant effect on loyalty post-service recovery.

Research limitations/implications

Empirical data were taken from one service industry; thus, it is reflective of only that service industry, generalizations should be mindful of our context bounded results.

Practical implications

The study offers suggestions for managers to leverage the dimensions of perceived justice in order to build trust and loyalty post-service failure. Hotels should treat customers with fairness and respect at every point of contact during the service recovery process. Reward based compensation should be offered to customers to build trust.

Originality/value

The study is among a few to assess service recovery and its link with loyalty from a developing economy context. The study revealed that perceptions of justice with service recovery influences customer loyalty and satisfaction post-service recovery and extend the understanding of service recovery in the Ghanaian hotel sector.

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Insights, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9792

Keywords

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Article

Kwasi Dartey-Baah and Seth Ayisi Addo

This study aims to examine influence of transformational and transactional leadership styles on employees’ organisational citizenship behaviours (OCBs), as well as the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine influence of transformational and transactional leadership styles on employees’ organisational citizenship behaviours (OCBs), as well as the mediating role of job involvement in the Ghanaian hospitality industry.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were gathered from 258 employees in some selected hotels and restaurants in the Greater Accra Region of Ghana through a survey and analysed using covariance-based structural equation modelling.

Findings

The results indicated that both leadership styles influenced employees’ OCBs positively. Furthermore, job involvement positively influenced OCB and mediated between transformational leadership and OCB but not between transactional leadership and employees’ OCBs.

Practical implications

The study reaffirms the importance of employees’ OCBs and recommends that hotels and restaurants must encourage their supervisors to exhibit more transformational leadership behaviours (motivational, inspirational and visionary behaviours), as well as a combination of transformational and transactional leadership behaviours which can influence their employees to go beyond formal requirements, and get more involved in their jobs to the benefit of the organisations.

Originality/value

This study reveals the extent to which internal motivations of employees, specifically their job involvement, causes their extra-role behaviours and influences the leaders–OCB relationships from a developing country perspective.

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Article

Elizabeth Agyeiwaah, Frederick Dayour and (Joe) Yong Zhou

Studies in hospitality and tourism have seldom investigated the role of employee commitment to building customers' attitudinal loyalty. This study examines the impact of…

Abstract

Purpose

Studies in hospitality and tourism have seldom investigated the role of employee commitment to building customers' attitudinal loyalty. This study examines the impact of employee commitment on customers' attitude-based loyalty. The study contributes to knowledge of how employees' affective attitude (i.e. employee commitment) impacts and mediates the relationships within this model by considering service quality attributes separately in the context of China's Greater Bay Area.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a quantitative approach, 664 customers visiting hotels and tourist attractions within three cities of Hong Kong, Macau and Zhuhai were surveyed. A convenience sampling technique was employed to administer questionnaires within these contexts. A structural equation modeling (SEM) using AMOS software was used to test the relationships in the proposed model.

Findings

The results suggest that while service quality attributes have a different impact on employee commitment, employee commitment plays a response-predictor-mediator role in the attitudinal loyalty framework. For instance, personal interactions and technical quality are significant predictors of employee commitment. Employee commitment influences customer satisfaction and behavioral intentions. Moreover, employee commitment fully mediates the relationship between technical quality and customer satisfaction and partially mediates the association between personal interaction and customer satisfaction.

Practical implications

Given that employee commitment could be derived from personal interaction with customers, hoteliers and destination management organizations should encourage customers through their websites to be responsive to employees by providing constructive feedback on their service delivery. Management of hotels, attractions and destinations need to motivate employees through incentives such as pay raise, bonuses, time-off and paid holidays.

Originality/value

The paper is inimitable in its attempt to extend the customer attitudinal loyalty debate by including employees' attitude (i.e. commitment) in the measurement of customers' attitudinal loyalty in the hospitality and tourism industry.

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Insights, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9792

Keywords

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Article

Jiseon Ahn and Jookyung Kwon

Although corporate social responsibility (CSR) is one of the essential marketing activities in the hotel industry, the effect of CSR perception on customer's revisit…

Abstract

Purpose

Although corporate social responsibility (CSR) is one of the essential marketing activities in the hotel industry, the effect of CSR perception on customer's revisit intention varies depending on mediators and contexts. Thus, this study aims to examine how hotel companies can effectively influence customers' patronage behaviors by leveraging overall customers' CSR perception, trust and commitment.

Design/methodology/approach

For this purpose, an online survey is conducted among hotel customers in the USA. Partial least squares–structural equation modeling is utilized to analyze the collected data.

Findings

The results show that customers' perception toward CSR does not have a direct effect on customers' revisit intention. Interestingly, the authors find that customers' perception influences their revisit intention only via increasing trust and commitment. Also, trust appears to be highly critical for positive behavioral outcomes than commitment.

Research limitations/implications

The limitations of the current research are that the different types of CSR activities and customers' demographics were not compared.

Practical implications

Customers' revisit intention is created when hotel companies provide not only CSR initiatives but also customers' perceived connection with the hotel brand.

Originality/value

Tourism and hospitality companies have focused on CSR activities because CSR activities are influential strategies to attract customers who want meaningful, responsible and sustainable experiences. By applying the cognitive consistency theory, the results of this study indicate that hotel companies can successfully use CSR activities to develop customers' revisit intention by enhancing their relational value.

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Insights, vol. 3 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9792

Keywords

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Article

Mohd Nasir Hazira, Elangkovan Narayanan Alagas, Muslim Amin, Norol Hamiza Zamzuri and Mohd Mohd Zairul

This paper aims to explore the best practices in marketing strategies for the Malaysian business event industry.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the best practices in marketing strategies for the Malaysian business event industry.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative methodology was adopted to collect primary data from semi-structured interviews. The informants included ten experts from the Malaysian business event industry. The data collected were then grouped using the ATLAS.ti (v.8) software for thematic analysis. A trustworthiness assessment was applied to increase the credibility and ensure the rigour of the qualitative findings.

Findings

The qualitative results revealed the following final themes: event marketing, the marketing plan, the 7 Ps of the marketing mix, strength, weaknesses, opportunities and threats (SWOT) analysis and traditional and digital marketing. Interestingly, three inductive themes were also emerged as follows: relationship marketing, unique selling points (USPs) and key opinion leaders.

Research limitations/implications

This study looked at Malaysian business events and focused only on findings from the industry expert's perspective. In the future, further investigation may concentrate on other business event industry players such as destination marketing companies, airline operators, travel intermediaries, clients, suppliers, universities and the government.

Practical implications

The findings offer a holistic approach to increase Malaysia's competitiveness among other primary business event host destinations in the Asian-Pacific, improve its worldwide and Asian-Pacific rankings and better position the country as a preferred business event destination during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic.

Originality/value

This is the first such study to date, which has never been explored in qualitative academic research. This study has substantial implications for various business event industry stakeholders in Malaysia.

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Insights, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9792

Keywords

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Article

Yan Feng, Xiaolian Chen and Ivan Lai

B&B stays have enjoyed popularity in China over recent decades. This study examines the impacts of the three dimensions of tourist experiential quality on the perceived…

Abstract

Purpose

B&B stays have enjoyed popularity in China over recent decades. This study examines the impacts of the three dimensions of tourist experiential quality on the perceived functional and emotional value and customer satisfaction with B&B stays in Southwestern China.

Design/methodology/approach

Questionnaires were collected from 433 Chinese visitors in Southwestern China. Partial least squares–structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) was used to test the significance of the relationship that exists among experiential quality, perceived value and tourist satisfaction.

Findings

The research results proved that experiential quality predicts customer satisfaction with B&B stays as mediated by perceived functional and emotional values. The specific experiential quality - fun – has the strongest effect on both perceived functional value and emotional value between the three dimensions of experiential quality.

Research limitations/implications

Since fun is viewed as the most significant element, B&B providers should consider creating a more joyful encounter for tourists. They should enrich the activities and improve service to strengthen the experiential quality perceived by the tourists. Both relational experiences and authentic local experiences should be incorporated into the activities and services provided.

Originality/value

This is likely to be the first study to investigate the influence of three dimensions of experiential quality on perceived functional and emotional value and satisfaction from the B&B industry in China. The findings provide value through actionable insights into experiential qualities, functional and emotional values that drive tourist satisfaction.

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Insights, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9792

Keywords

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Article

Kate Neequaye and A. Kobina Armoo

While colleges have perceived the importance and growth within the tourism and hospitality industry, students in the industry have mixed feelings about career options that…

Abstract

Purpose

While colleges have perceived the importance and growth within the tourism and hospitality industry, students in the industry have mixed feelings about career options that are available to them. The purpose of this paper is to discuss factors that underpin students ' perception of career options in the tourism and hospitality industry and to make recommendations for other developing countries.

Design/methodology/approach

A 21-variable structured questionnaire was used to solicit response from 260 Ghanaian tourism and hospitality students. The data was coded and keyed into MINITAB and SPSS statistical processing software. Various multivariate techniques such as Eigen-analysis, correlation analysis and factor analysis were used to analyze the data. Secondary data was also obtained for student records.

Findings

The study revealed that, industry-person congeniality, social benefit factors, opportunity for professional development, and job competitiveness, were crucial in determining students ' choice of career options. Other factors include, career opportunities in tourism and hospitality industry were more easily attainable than in many other sectors of the economy; remuneration in the industry is grossly inadequate.

Research limitations/implications

A limitation of the study is the use of HTM students of one university. Therefore, replication of this study in other tourism and hospitality institutions of higher in other developing countries is strongly recommended to harmonize the findings of this study.

Practical implications

Several implications were found including: getting students to be made aware of the career and career development opportunities available in each sector; educational institutions should partner with industry to provide internship and employment opportunities, that would encourage students to have a better perception of the industry; curb the escalating trend of “brain drain” away for the industry, while the industry should reorganize itself to correct the negative perception of low wages and high turnover.

Originality/value

The study was an original primary study that surveyed students at two tertiary level institutions to determine their perception of the career options available to them. The lessons are of value to stakeholders of Ghana ' s tourism and hospitality industry and relevance to those in other developing countries.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

Keywords

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Article

David Tanoh Aduhene and Eric Osei-Assibey

The world's economies are on their knees following the negative impact of the coronavirus pandemic over the past 8 months. Growing number of researches has been conducted…

Abstract

Purpose

The world's economies are on their knees following the negative impact of the coronavirus pandemic over the past 8 months. Growing number of researches has been conducted on the impact of COVID-19 pandemic on developed countries with little attention on developing countries, who are still grappling with the negative impact of the coronavirus. The rationale for this study is to assess the socio-economic impact of COVID-19 on Ghana's economy and government response to the pandemic as well as policy options to revive the ailing economy.

Design/methodology/approach

This study explored the socio-economic impact of the coronavirus on Ghana's economy using a discourse analysis with data from various secondary sources to analyze the impact of the pandemic from the Ghanaian perspective.

Findings

The findings from the discourse analysis revealed that the coronavirus pandemic has negatively impacted on the socio-economic situation of the citizens of Ghana. Whiles an estimated 42,000 people lost their jobs in the first two months of the pandemic in Ghana, tourist attraction sector of the country alone lost $171 million dollars in the past three months due to the partial lockdown and closure of tourism and hospitality centers in the country. The study revealed that Ghana's healthcare system has been overwhelmed by the number of increasing cases in the country to extent of making use of temporary structures as isolation and treatment centers of the pandemic. The study revealed that Ghana may convert these challenges posed by the COVID-19 pandemic into prospects and opportunities by investing massively in the health sector and creating support for the SMEs which creates massive employment for many Ghanaians.

Research limitations/implications

This study focuses on the impact of the COVID-19 on Ghana's economy and how the pandemic has negatively affected the country. The study is an exploratory study that makes use of secondary data. However, conducting a study with primary data sources from specific communities or regions in the country may not produce the same results. The results from the primary level or community level may be different from the general results obtained from the study. In future it is expected that the study focuses specifically on the extent of the coronavirus pandemic on Ghana's fiscal deficit which seems to have ballooned in recent times.

Originality/value

The study is the first of its kind to extensively explore the socio-economic impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the Ghanaian economy. The novelty of this paper is that it recognizes governments response to the pandemic and proposes three practical measures adopted to put the country's economy back on its feet through survive, revive and ensuring growth in all sectors of the economy.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 48 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

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Article

Joshua Abor

This study seeks to examine the effect of industry classification on the capital structure of SMEs in Ghana.

Abstract

Purpose

This study seeks to examine the effect of industry classification on the capital structure of SMEs in Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

The analytical technique employed is regression framework with various capital structure measures as dependent variables, and with industry as the independent variable. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) and other non‐parametric tests were also used to examine the differences in the capital structure of the SMEs across industries.

Findings

The results of this study indicate that SMEs in the agricultural sector exhibit the highest capital structure and asset structure or collateral value, while the wholesale and retail trade industry have the lowest debt ratio and asset structure. The regression results indicate that agriculture and pharmaceutical and medical industries depend more on long‐term and short‐term debt than does the manufacturing sector. Information and communication, and wholesale and retail trade sectors are more likely to use short‐term credit than the manufacturing sector. The results also show that the construction and mining industry is less likely to depend on short‐term debt, while hotel and hospitality depend more on long‐term debt and less on short‐term finance. The results clearly indicate that industry effect is important in explaining the capital structure of SMEs and that there are variations in capital structure across the various industries.

Originality/value

The main value of this paper is the analysis of the effect of industry classification on SMEs' capital structure from the Ghanaian perspective. The study provides insights on the financing behaviour of SMEs across various industries in Ghana.

Details

Studies in Economics and Finance, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1086-7376

Keywords

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