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Article
Publication date: 31 August 2021

Han Chen, Yvette Green and Kim Williams

Supervisory employees in the hotel industry experience high levels of emotional exhaustion. The current study aims to examine the impact of perceived manager support

Abstract

Purpose

Supervisory employees in the hotel industry experience high levels of emotional exhaustion. The current study aims to examine the impact of perceived manager support, perceived control over time and negative emotions at others on hotel supervisors' emotional exhaustion. It further investigates the mediating role of perceived control over time and negative emotions at others on the relationship between perceived manager support and hotel supervisors' emotional exhaustion.

Design/methodology/approach

Paper questionnaires were distributed at a hotel supervisor training seminar. A total of 155 usable responses were collected from hotel supervisors. Confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling were used for hypotheses testing.

Findings

Results showed that perceived manager support and perceived control over time both were negatively associated with hotel supervisors' emotional exhaustion. Negative emotions at others were positively related to hotel supervisors' emotional exhaustion. Both perceived control over time and negative emotions at others were found to mediate the relationship between perceived manager support and hotel supervisors' emotional exhaustion.

Originality/value

The study applied the job demand–resources model and the affective event theory to examine hotel supervisors' emotional exhaustion. The mediating role of perceived control over time and negative emotions at others added to the current knowledge of factors that are associated with hotel supervisory employees' emotional exhaustion.

Details

International Hospitality Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2516-8142

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Article
Publication date: 19 March 2018

You-De Dai, Yu-Hsiang Hou, Kuan-Yang Chen and Wen-Long Zhuang

Drawing on organizational support theory, this study aims to propose and test a moderated path analysis to explore the interactive effect of perceived supervisor support

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Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on organizational support theory, this study aims to propose and test a moderated path analysis to explore the interactive effect of perceived supervisor support and supervisors’ organizational embodiment on organizational citizenship behavior, as well as the mediating effect of perceived organizational support.

Design/methodology/approach

Hypotheses are tested using two-phase survey data collected from 398 dyads of employees and their immediate supervisors from 26 (three-to-five star) hotels in Taiwan.

Findings

The hierarchical linear modeling results suggest that perceived organizational support mediates the relationship between perceived supervisor support and organizational citizenship behavior. These findings indicate that supervisors’ organizational embodiment positively moderates the relationship between perceived supervisor support and perceived organizational support, which, in turn, mediates the interaction between perceived supervisor support and supervisors’ organizational embodiment on organizational citizenship behavior.

Research limitations/implications

This is the first study to examine the moderating role of supervisors’ organizational embodiment in hospitality domain. In high or low supervisors’ organizational embodiment context, hotels are supposed to assign representative managers that could strengthen the efficiency of perceived supervisor support. Finally, employees will perceive organizational support and then lead to employee organizational citizenship behavior.

Originality/value

Previous research indicates that perceived organizational support positively impacts various employee outcomes. However, the antecedents and psychological mechanisms of perceived organizational support are still not well understood. This research intends to fill these gaps in the literature.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 30 April 2021

Jennifer R. Spoor, Rebecca L. Flower, Simon M. Bury and Darren Hedley

Although there is growing academic and business interest in autism employment programs, few studies have examined employee (manager and coworker) attitudes toward these…

Abstract

Purpose

Although there is growing academic and business interest in autism employment programs, few studies have examined employee (manager and coworker) attitudes toward these programs. The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of workload changes (a job demand) and perceived supervisor support (a job resource) on commitment to the program and employee engagement more broadly.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 229 employees from two Australian public sector organizations completed a survey about the autism employment program in their organization.

Findings

Perceived workload increases were associated with lower affective commitment and higher continuance commitment to the program. Perceived supervisor support was associated with higher affective commitment to the program and employee engagement, but lower continuance commitment to the program. Perceived supervisor support moderated the effect of workload increase on employee engagement, but not in the expected direction.

Originality/value

This research helps to fill a gap in the autism employment literature by focusing on commitment toward autism employment programs among existing employees. The research helps to provide a more complete and nuanced view of these programs within their broader organizational context.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

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Article
Publication date: 28 May 2020

Parveen Kalliath, Thomas Kalliath, Xi Wen Chan and Christopher Chan

Drawing on the conservation of resources theory and social exchange theory, this study aims to examine the underlying relationships linking work-to-family enrichment (WFE…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on the conservation of resources theory and social exchange theory, this study aims to examine the underlying relationships linking work-to-family enrichment (WFE) and family-to-work enrichment (FWE) to perceived supervisor support and ultimately, job satisfaction among social workers.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from members of a social work professional body (n = 439) through an internet-based questionnaire and analysed using confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modelling.

Findings

Perceived supervisor support mediated the relationships between work–family enrichment (specifically, WFE-Development, WFE-Affect and FWE-Efficiency) and job satisfaction.

Research limitations/implications

Social workers who worked in a positive work environment that uplifts their moods and attitudes (WFE-Affect), have access to intellectual and personal development (WFE-Development) and felt supported by their supervisors reported higher levels of job satisfaction. Those who possessed enrichment resources were found to be more efficient (FWE-Efficiency) also perceived their supervisors to be supportive and experienced higher job satisfaction. Future studies should consider other professional groups and incorporate a longitudinal design.

Practical implications

Promoting work–family enrichment among social workers can contribute to positive work outcomes such as perceived supervisor support and job satisfaction. HR practitioners, supervisors and organisations can promote work–family enrichment among social workers through introduction of family-friendly policies (e.g. flexitime, compressed workweek schedules) and providing a supportive work–family friendly environment for social workers.

Originality/value

Although several work–family studies have linked work–family enrichment to job satisfaction, the present study shows how each dimension of WFE and FWE affects social workers' job satisfaction.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 49 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 10 November 2020

Raminderpreet Kaur and Gurpreet Randhawa

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role of employee engagement and work–life balance in perceived supervisor support and turnover intentions relationship.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role of employee engagement and work–life balance in perceived supervisor support and turnover intentions relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

The perception of teachers on the constructs considered has been assessed by a survey using a structured questionnaire. Data were collected from the teachers of private schools of Punjab, India, and 375 were valid number of responses. Parallel multiple mediated regression was used to estimate the direct and indirect effects of perceived supervisor support on turnover intentions mediated through employee engagement and work–life balance.

Findings

The results reveal that the effect of perceived supervisor support on turnover intentions is indirect rather than direct. On the comparison of specific indirect effects, the results demonstrate that employee engagement and two dimensions of work–life balance (work interference with personal life and work–personal life enhancement) act as mediators in the perceived supervisor support and turnover intentions relationship.

Practical implications

School principals need to draft teacher-friendly policies for enhancing work–life balance and employee engagement so that teachers can feel satisfied with their work and can handle work and family demands. In this way, positive perceptions associated with high engagement and work–family balance can take place, which in turn can curtail the turnover intentions of teachers.

Originality/value

The use of employee engagement and work-life balance in the relationship of perceived supervisor support and turnover intentions is unprecedented. The study also considered three different dimensions of work–life balance and tested the model in an integrative manner. Since the study is based on an Indian sample, it also adds to growing literature on turnover intentions in nonwestern countries. The results are of great value to school managements, HR managers and policymakers who are seeking to develop practices that reduce employee turnover at workplaces.

Details

Evidence-based HRM: a Global Forum for Empirical Scholarship, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-3983

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Article
Publication date: 4 November 2014

Gaëtane Caesens, Florence Stinglhamber and Gaylord Luypaert

The purpose of this paper are twofold. First, the authors examined the effects of two types of working hard (i.e. work engagement, workaholism) on employees’ well-being…

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4061

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper are twofold. First, the authors examined the effects of two types of working hard (i.e. work engagement, workaholism) on employees’ well-being (i.e. job satisfaction, perceived stress, and sleep problems). Second, the authors tested the extent to which both types of working hard mediate the relationship between three types of work-related social support (i.e. perceived organizational support, perceived supervisor support, and perceived coworker support) and employees’ well-being.

Design/methodology/approach

An online questionnaire was administered to 343 PhD students.

Findings

Results revealed that work engagement mediates the relationships between perceived organizational support and job satisfaction and perceived stress. Perceived organizational support has also a direct positive impact on job satisfaction and a direct negative impact on perceived stress and sleep problems. Furthermore, work engagement mediates the influence of perceived supervisor support on job satisfaction and perceived stress. Finally, workaholism was found to mediate the relationships between perceived coworker support, and job satisfaction, perceived stress, and sleep problems.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that managers should promote practices in order to foster work engagement and prevent workaholism. In line with this, the findings indicated that the most powerful source of support that fosters work engagement is perceived supervisor support. Organizations should, therefore, train their supervisors to be supportive in their role of directing, evaluating and coaching subordinates or encourage supervisors to have regular meetings with their subordinates. Additionally, the results showed that perceived coworker support is the only source of work-related social support that has a negative influence on workaholism. Managers should foster coworker support, for instance by encouraging informal mentoring among employees in order to build a strong social network.

Originality/value

Because scholars argued that each type of work-related social support might have different consequences and might vary in terms of strength of associations with their outcomes, the study aimed to examine the concomitant effects of three forms of work-related social support on two types of working hard which, in turn, influence employees’ well-being.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 19 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2020

Wai Ming To and Jane W.Y. Lung

An internship is an essential part of vocational-oriented degree programs because it enhances the employability of graduates and prepares them for career development…

Abstract

Purpose

An internship is an essential part of vocational-oriented degree programs because it enhances the employability of graduates and prepares them for career development. Thus, it is important to understand how students view internships and whether they are satisfied with their internship experience. This paper explores the effects of organizational and individual factors on internship satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a literature review on internship, we propose a theoretical model in which organizational factors, including supervisor support and task clarity, and individual factors, including interns' perceived functional value and perceived social value, can lead to internship satisfaction while task clarity, perceived functional value and perceived social value can affect interns' self-initiative behavior. The proposed model was tested using responses from 161 Chinese students in Macao SAR.

Findings

The results of structural equation modeling indicated that supervisor support and perceived social value had direct and significant impacts on internship satisfaction while task clarity and perceived functional value had direct and significant impacts on interns' self-initiative behavior. Additionally, supervisor support significantly influenced task clarity, perceived functional value and perceived social value.

Originality/value

The paper identifies that supervisor support has a strong and significant impact on internship satisfaction. Additionally, the current study indicates that organizations should pay great attention to appoint the right work supervisors who are able to assign appropriate tasks to interns, provide clear guidance and facilitate social interaction between interns and other people.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 62 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 29 July 2014

Cort W. Rudolph, Jesse S. Michel, Michael B. Harari and Tyler J. Stout

Despite the abundance of research on work social support and work-family conflict, the generalizability of these relationships to immigrant and non-immigrant Hispanics is…

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1401

Abstract

Purpose

Despite the abundance of research on work social support and work-family conflict, the generalizability of these relationships to immigrant and non-immigrant Hispanics is still unknown. Based on role and cultural theories, the purpose of this paper is to provide an empirical examination of these relationships within this growing yet understudied population.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data were collected from a diverse sample of employed immigrant and non-immigrant Hispanics from a broad set of occupational groups within Miami, Florida (USA). Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to test hypotheses. Multi-group analyses were conducted to test for differences in model fit and parameter estimates between the immigrant and non-immigrant subgroups.

Findings

The hypothesized model fit the data well, with a significant positive relationship between perceived organizational social support and perceived supervisor social support, a significant negative relationship between perceived organizational social support and work-to-family conflict, and a significant negative relationship between perceived supervisor social support and family-to-work conflict. Multi-group SEM, which offered acceptable model fit, suggests that perceived organizational social support is associated with reduced work-family conflict for immigrant but not for non-immigrant Hispanics, and perceived supervisor social support is associated with reduced work-family conflict for non-immigrant but not for immigrant Hispanics.

Research limitations/implications

Cross-sectional data do not allow for strong causal interpretations.

Practical implications

Perceived work social support is an important indicator of work-family conflict for both immigrant and non-immigrant Hispanics, although specific relationships can differ based on immigration status.

Originality/value

Few studies have investigated differences in work-family conflict between non-immigrant and immigrant Hispanics.

Details

Cross Cultural Management, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

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Article
Publication date: 9 March 2015

Hannes Zacher and Heiko Schulz

In many countries, both the number of older people in need of care and the number of employed caregivers of elderly relatives will increase over the next decades. The…

Abstract

Purpose

In many countries, both the number of older people in need of care and the number of employed caregivers of elderly relatives will increase over the next decades. The purpose of this paper is to examine the extent to which perceived organizational, supervisor, and coworker support for eldercare reduce employed caregivers’ strain and weaken the relationship between eldercare demands and strain.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data were collected from 100 employed caregivers from one organization.

Findings

Results showed that eldercare demands were positively related to strain, and perceived organizational eldercare support (POES) was negatively related to strain. In addition, high POES weakened the relationship between eldercare demands and strain.

Research limitations/implications

The cross-sectional design and use of self-report scales constitute limitations of the study.

Practical implications

POES is a resource for employed caregivers, especially when their eldercare demands are high.

Originality/value

This research highlights the relative importance of different forms of perceived support for reducing employed caregivers’ strain and weakening the relationship between eldercare demands and strain.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 25 December 2020

Gul Afshan and Carolina Serrano-Archimi

Drawing on the self-consistency theory and temporal comparison theory, this study hypothesize that relative perceived supervisor support may positively affect voice…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on the self-consistency theory and temporal comparison theory, this study hypothesize that relative perceived supervisor support may positively affect voice behaviour and negatively affect relationship conflict with a supervisor. This relationship happens through the underlying process of supervisor-based self-esteem acts as an underlying mechanism. But, such a relationship would be constrained by the value of temporal perceived supervisor support with high temporal perceived supervisor support strengthen this relationship as compared to low temporal perceived supervisor support.

Design/methodology/approach

Dyad data from 338 samples of employees nested within 50 supervisor workgroups from non-profit firms operating in three different cities in Sindh Pakistan were taken.

Findings

Data analysis showed that employees with a high perception of relative perceived supervisor support engaged in voice behaviour and restrain themselves from the relationship conflict. The supervisor-based self-esteem derived from supervisor support played the role of mediating this relationship. Moreover, temporal perceived supervisor support not only moderated the path between relative perceived supervisor support and supervisor-based self-esteem also the mediational strength of supervisor-based self-esteem in relative perceived supervisor support and voice behaviour and relationship conflict.

Practical implications

It is crucial to integrate social comparison in organizational support theory to view the supervisor–subordinate relationship beyond dyad. Managers should understand social comparison processes in which employees engage in to know how it affects various work attitudes and behaviours.

Originality/value

Given the importance of supervisor–subordinate relationships, the authors extend and build on the concept of social and temporal organizational support to supervisor support. The study is novel in studying such relationship and contribute to the supervisory support relationship literature beyond dyadic level.

Details

Journal of Economic and Administrative Sciences, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1026-4116

Keywords

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