Search results

1 – 10 of 38
Article
Publication date: 1 February 2011

Matthew Gold and George Otte

This paper sets out to analyze the implementation of an academic social network that connects faculty members, administrators, and graduate students in a multi‐campus university

Abstract

Purpose

This paper sets out to analyze the implementation of an academic social network that connects faculty members, administrators, and graduate students in a multi‐campus university system. Part of a new generation of university‐sponsored virtual spaces that foreground social networking, the CUNY Academic Commons has fostered a growing community of members who use the site to collaborate with colleagues across the system. This paper seeks to describe the processes involved in creating the site and to offer guidance to institutions considering similar projects.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents a case study of the CUNY Academic Commons that is supported by site analytics, usage reports, and public site materials.

Findings

The CUNY Academic Commons has increased awareness of member projects and research interests, built a greater sense of community between discrete campuses, promoted an open culture of sharing, and encouraged collaborative ventures across the system. The site gives members a greater degree of control over the design, presentation, and content of their own web‐based work than is traditionally possible in closed‐source, closely managed university websites.

Originality/value

The paper will be of interest to academic institutions interested in using social‐networking technologies to strengthen their communities.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 August 2007

George Otte

The purpose of this paper is to track trends in online learning and in higher education generally, particularly to see how the former might solve key problems for the latter.

502

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to track trends in online learning and in higher education generally, particularly to see how the former might solve key problems for the latter.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents a case study as a specific solution to a general problem.

Findings

The paper finds that, given the growing ubiquity of online instruction, its primary orientation may have shifted from “distance education” to largely local outreach, specifically as a way of addressing the growing problem of degree completion. The conclusion is that online learning may well be experiencing a generational shift, a turned corner from distance education to local access, and from a satellite operation to an integral part of an institution's function and mission.

Originality/value

The paper provides useful information on trends in online learning and higher education.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 August 2007

Barton Kunstler

The aim of this paper is to provide discursive background to a consideration of higher education's approach to online learning and set out the terms of engagement represented by

143

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to provide discursive background to a consideration of higher education's approach to online learning and set out the terms of engagement represented by the articles in this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is in the form of a narrative surveying the state of the discourse on online learning and providing a brief introduction to each of the articles.

Findings

The paper finds that history of online education has been compressed into a brief period, but it has already undergone several phases: from initial euphoria over the possibilities for expanded enrollments to a realization that online learning posed a new set of knotty pedagogical and institutional issues, to a current maturing phase. In this latter phase there is a pressing need for a public dialog that addresses the institutional challenges inherent in online education, and that provides examples of successful experiences and even specific guidelines for any institution or program involved with – or considering initiation of – an online program. This special issue of On the Horizon is intended as a contribution to this dialog.

Originality/value

The paper establishes a framework for in‐depth consideration of the issues addressed in this issue of On the Horizon.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2001

Tony Tinker is at and Barbara Feknous

The litmus test of asynchronous learning lies not in supporting small groups of elite groups, who are well endowed with computer and communications resources, but in providing for…

Abstract

The litmus test of asynchronous learning lies not in supporting small groups of elite groups, who are well endowed with computer and communications resources, but in providing for oversized classes, whose students are stretched by competing demands of work, family, and academic life, and who have — at best — modest experience and access to computer technology. This case study shows that a hybrid design — of synchronous and asynchronous methods — improves the quality of learning among large classes of undergraduate accounting students. Far from auguring the end of “education‐as‐we‐know‐it” (where a face‐to‐face community is replaced by a server‐in‐a‐box) this mixed strategy provides a useful tool in augmenting traditional learning methods.

Details

Pacific Accounting Review, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0114-0582

Article
Publication date: 21 August 2007

Robert Whittaker

The aim of this paper is to describe the rapid development and effectiveness of online education in an urban college, emphasizing the use of distance education by local students

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to describe the rapid development and effectiveness of online education in an urban college, emphasizing the use of distance education by local students, their academic performance and perspectives for future growth.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper provides a description of the phases of distance education development. It analyzes of survey data on student response to online learning and analysis of grades indicating academic performance online in relation to overall undergraduate performance.

Findings

The paper finds that early unplanned development has brought increased administrative support: plans are being made for programs, major concentrations, and advanced degrees on the undergraduate and graduate level. Student academic success reflects the special demands of online education and indicates the need for special screening processes and support services.

Research implications

The academic success of students reflects the special demands of distance learning and qualifies the popularity of distance education as seen in rapid increases in online enrollment.

Practical implications

The promise of distance education for a local student population (to speed progress to degree completion by increasing the number of courses per semester) should be tested in terms of student academic success.

Originality/value

This account of how distance learning can develop in an urban, commuter college and the possibilities for improving service to existing students while increasing enrollment, suggests strategies for effective integration of online courses into the existing undergraduate and graduate curriculum.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Dean Kruckeberg and Marina Vujnovic

While propaganda was central to U.S. public diplomacy in earlier times, and remains central today, the United States must now practice true public diplomacy, which should rely…

6450

Abstract

While propaganda was central to U.S. public diplomacy in earlier times, and remains central today, the United States must now practice true public diplomacy, which should rely, not only on political theory and the theories of international relations, but also on theories and models of public relations that are based on two‐way symmetrical communication and community‐building. A propaganda model centers the United States at the hub of the global milieu in its relationships with other nations, i.e., a diplomatic worldview in which the ‘spokes’ of America's communication and relationships radiate outward to satellites of stakeholders; in contrast, the United States is not centered so self‐importantly in a community‐building model. Rather, this model recognizes that America is only one part of a global social system. America's public diplomacy must recognize that the United States' global constituents are ‘publics,’ not ‘markets,’ and that an effective public diplomacy model must be one that is not propaganda or market‐oriented advocacy, but one that is based on two‐way symmetrical communication and community‐building.

Details

Journal of Communication Management, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-254X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 February 2021

Elias G. Carayannis, João J.M. Ferreira and Cristina Fernandes

Knowledge and its management and, more recently, strategic knowledge management (SKM) represent major challenges for the organisations of the 21st century. Despite the importance…

Abstract

Purpose

Knowledge and its management and, more recently, strategic knowledge management (SKM) represent major challenges for the organisations of the 21st century. Despite the importance of this knowledge field, and the significant quantity of research that has focussed on this theme, there is a dearth of studies in the literature undertaking a systematic SKM review. This study aims to provide a currently complete and systematic SKM review to stimulate and contribute to furthering this academic field and correspondingly set out an agenda for future research.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper sourced the data from the science citation index expanded (SCI-expanded), the social sciences citation index (SSCI) and the arts and humanities citation index (A&H CI) databases. This research spanned references published in journals belonging to the categories of management, business and economics without any chronological filter. The search returned a total of 99 references with their dates of publication between 1995 (1 reference) and 2018 (7 references).

Findings

The results included the identification of three core approaches to this study field: SKM models and competitive advantage, SKM implementation and the Systematic SKM approach.

Practical implications

This current study seeks to undertake the mapping of the scientific publications, the intellectual structure and research trends in the SKM field to: identify the fundamental contributions to the SKM research field; determine the research pathways establishing its intellectual structure and the scientific journals with the greatest impact on the field and identify the SKM research field geographical distribution and its collaborative structure.

Originality/value

This study defines a roadmap for an informed research agenda that proposes multiple directions: the usage and development of an innovative theory that may open new paths for future research and theoretical construction; a more sophisticated understanding of the concept and its applicability; approaching the shortcomings interrelated with the content across different levels of analysis; and the application of relevant and appropriate methodologies for operationalizing SKM.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 25 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 February 2019

Malin Backman, Hannah Pitt, Terry Marsden, Abid Mehmood and Erik Mathijs

This paper aims to critically reflect the current specialist discourse on experiential approaches to higher education for sustainable development (HESD). Limitations to the…

1253

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to critically reflect the current specialist discourse on experiential approaches to higher education for sustainable development (HESD). Limitations to the current discourse are identified, and as a result, an alternative approach to the study of experiential education (EE) within HESD is suggested.

Design/methodology/approach

Three research questions are addressed by analysing the literature on EE and experiential learning (EL) within HESD in specialist academic journals.

Findings

There is a consensus among authors regarding the appropriateness of experiential approaches to HESD. However, limitations to the current discourse suggest the need for an alternative approach to studying EE within HESD. Therefore, this paper proposes the application of the learning landscape metaphor to take a more student-centred and holistic perspective.

Originality/value

The learning landscape metaphor has previously not been applied to EE within HESD. This alternative conceptualisation foregrounds student perspectives to experiential initiatives within HESD. The holistic approach aims to understand the myriad influences on students learning, while allowing examination of how experiential approaches relate to other educational approaches within HESD.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1988

Carol A. Codori

Concepts and practical applications are used to explore motivation from the perspectives of auditors, managers and psychologists. The premise is that improved communication…

Abstract

Concepts and practical applications are used to explore motivation from the perspectives of auditors, managers and psychologists. The premise is that improved communication positively affects auditor and manager performance. Several theories of motivation are examined, including behaviour types, as explored through the Myers‐Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI). Putting theory into practice, ways are looked at in which audit supervisors can enhance audit staff motivation by more actively involving them in audit planning and report writing. From the manager's perspective, how to use the audit process more effectively to encourage managers to make organisational improvements is addressed.

Details

Managerial Auditing Journal, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-6902

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 October 2013

Louise Cooke and Hazel Hall

This paper aims to review the value of social network analysis (SNA) as a method appropriate to LIS research. SNA is used to investigate the effectiveness of a framework of…

1374

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review the value of social network analysis (SNA) as a method appropriate to LIS research. SNA is used to investigate the effectiveness of a framework of methods adopted by the DREaM project to develop researcher-practitioner networks.

Design/methodology/approach

Following a review of the literature on SNA, the paper reports longitudinal research from a whole population sample of the DREaM cadre of LIS researchers. Data were collected using a questionnaire at the start of the first DREaM project workshop, and at the final workshop. Data were analysed using Ucinet 6 software, and network diagrams were visualised using the Netdraw package.

Findings

Findings demonstrate that the combination of linked workshops and use of social media throughout the DREaM project was successful in increasing the density of the researcher networks, forging new connections among participants. SNA was found to be a useful technique in investigating network development.

Research limitations/implications

There is scope for further longitudinal research to investigate the sustainability and strength of the new network links forged.

Originality/value

The use of SNA in the context of the development of researcher networks is novel in LIS research. The findings from this project indicate the potential of the DREaM methodology as a replicable framework for developing further research networks in other contexts. This paper represents a unique contribution in demonstrating through the use of SNA the extent of the extension of research networks afforded by the DREaM methodology.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 69 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

1 – 10 of 38