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1 – 10 of over 15000
Article
Publication date: 2 October 2020

Robin Bell and Heather Bell

Experiential approaches have become increasingly common in entrepreneurship education in response to calls for different approaches to the traditional didactic…

Abstract

Purpose

Experiential approaches have become increasingly common in entrepreneurship education in response to calls for different approaches to the traditional didactic process-driven approach. Experiential approaches offer the potential to develop the skills and mindset that are required in entrepreneurship. Research has highlighted the critical importance of educator pedagogical competence in the delivery and quality of teaching and learning in further and higher education. Nevertheless, educator narratives and practices are often based on foundations that suggest a lack in the depth of knowledge and understanding of the underlying pedagogic learning theories and practice. This paper brings educational theory and pedagogic practice together in a three-stage framework of the experiential entrepreneurship learning process to support entrepreneurship educators within further and higher education.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reviews and brings together the seminal educational theories and philosophies of constructivism, objectivism, Kolb's (1984) theory of experiential learning, Schön's (1983) reflection-in-action and Mezirow's (1997) theory of transformative learning, to develop a framework which underpins the experiential entrepreneurship learning process.

Findings

This paper develops a three-stage framework which informs the roles of an educator and a learner in experiential entrepreneurship education within further and higher education, based on educational theories and philosophies that inform the learning process.

Practical implications

The developed framework supports the pedagogic competence of educators in the delivery of experiential entrepreneurship education through a deeper understanding of the supporting theory that informs the pedagogic practice. This will provide consolidation to enable educators to maximise the effectiveness of their educational practice (Kaynardağ, 2019) and can increase the legitimacy of entrepreneurship education (Foliard et al., 2018).

Originality/value

This paper meets calls in the literature to provide a closer engagement between educational theory and pedagogic practice to afford guidance as to how educators can navigate some of the different educational theories and philosophies to consolidate the effective delivery of quality experiential entrepreneurship education. Applying seminal educational theories and philosophies to ensure the quality of experiential education can support the legitimacy of experiential entrepreneurship education.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 February 2016

Richard Mandel and Erik Noyes

The purpose of this paper is to analyze experiential entrepreneurship education offerings – programs and courses – among the “Top 25” undergraduate schools of…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze experiential entrepreneurship education offerings – programs and courses – among the “Top 25” undergraduate schools of entrepreneurship in the USA. The motivation is to understand the array and vitality of experiential initiatives across the country. A related aim is to unearth obstacles to offering experiential entrepreneurship and identify affordable, viable options. Surveying undergraduate program deans, chairs and administrators, the authors inventory and analyze experiences offered in top entrepreneurship programs. The target audience for the research is entrepreneurship education researchers and business program leaders.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology is a survey approach. A survey was sent to the entrepreneurship program leaders of the “Top 25” business schools according to recently published rankings. In total, 57 percent of the target population responded to the survey.

Findings

The authors find that credit-yielding experiential entrepreneurship offerings are abundant. Yet an array of challenges constrain the growth this mode of delivery – including finding suitable faculty, mentors and other support resources.

Research limitations/implications

A potential limitation of the study is its focus on “Top 25” undergraduate entrepreneurship programs, as this may not be reflective of activity in the wider sample of entrepreneurship programs.

Practical implications

The first inventory of its kind, this study provides vital knowledge about the array of practices by leading programs. The study may be used to drive benchmarking and further innovation by leaders of entrepreneurship programs.

Originality/value

To the best knowledge of the authors, this is the most comprehensive, recent study of undergraduate, experiential entrepreneurship education.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 58 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 6 April 2021

J. Ben Arbaugh, Alvin Hwang, Jeffrey J. McNally, Charles J. Fornaciari and Lisa A. Burke-Smalley

This paper aims to compare the nature of three different business and management education (BME) research streams (online/blended learning, entrepreneurship education and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to compare the nature of three different business and management education (BME) research streams (online/blended learning, entrepreneurship education and experiential learning), along with their citation sources to draw insights on their support and legitimacy bases, with lessons on improving such support and legitimacy for the streams and the wider BME research field.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors analyze the nature of three BME research streams and their citation sources through tests of differences across streams.

Findings

The three streams differ in research foci and approaches such as the use of managerial samples in experiential learning, quantitative studies in online/blended education and literature reviews in entrepreneurship education. They also differ in sources of legitimacy recognition and avenues for mobilization of support. The underlying literature development pattern of the experiential learning stream indicates a need for BME scholars to identify and build on each other’s work.

Research limitations/implications

Identification of different research bases and key supporting literature in the different streams shows important core articles that are useful to build research in each stream.

Practical implications

Readers will understand the different research bases supporting the three research streams, along with their targeted audience and practice implications.

Social implications

The discovery of different support bases for the three different streams helps identify the network of authors and relationships that have been built in each stream.

Originality/value

According to the authors’ knowledge, this paper is the first to uncover differences in nature and citation sources of the three continuously growing BME research streams with recommendations on ways to improve the support of the three streams.

Details

Organization Management Journal, vol. 18 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN:

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Albertos Azaria, Efthymios Valkanos and Nick Dukakis

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of the Greek recession on the design of adult vocational training through the financial crisis effects on…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of the Greek recession on the design of adult vocational training through the financial crisis effects on entrepreneurship and, in particular, the significance of the conditions of the in-house experiential learning effective implementation in the new macroeconomic circumstances.

Design/methodology/approach

An overall theoretical approach is attempted through the bibliographic review and the analysis of selected scientific forums’ data.

Findings

The results of the literature review yielded 24 important factors-prerequisites that influence the implementation of in-house experiential adult education. The importance of the in-house experiential learning and the role of adult educators are emphasized in the direction of the essential skills acquisition that shall provide employees and enterprises with intellectual and practical assistance, so that they may adjust to the new macroeconomic environment.

Practical implications

This effort has provided a number of useful proposals to each recipient involved in adult education and training in order to reinforce the support of the business world as much as possible, especially during the time period of recession, and to reduce unemployment.

Originality/value

Starting from the fact that the macroeconomic recession itself constitutes an inevitable experience of an entire social, economic and educational system, the present study attempts a realistic approach of the significance of in-house experiential education and training in the direction of successful adjustment of enterprises, employees, adult educators and the State itself against the challenges of our times.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 49 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 February 2019

Malin Backman, Hannah Pitt, Terry Marsden, Abid Mehmood and Erik Mathijs

This paper aims to critically reflect the current specialist discourse on experiential approaches to higher education for sustainable development (HESD). Limitations to…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to critically reflect the current specialist discourse on experiential approaches to higher education for sustainable development (HESD). Limitations to the current discourse are identified, and as a result, an alternative approach to the study of experiential education (EE) within HESD is suggested.

Design/methodology/approach

Three research questions are addressed by analysing the literature on EE and experiential learning (EL) within HESD in specialist academic journals.

Findings

There is a consensus among authors regarding the appropriateness of experiential approaches to HESD. However, limitations to the current discourse suggest the need for an alternative approach to studying EE within HESD. Therefore, this paper proposes the application of the learning landscape metaphor to take a more student-centred and holistic perspective.

Originality/value

The learning landscape metaphor has previously not been applied to EE within HESD. This alternative conceptualisation foregrounds student perspectives to experiential initiatives within HESD. The holistic approach aims to understand the myriad influences on students learning, while allowing examination of how experiential approaches relate to other educational approaches within HESD.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 January 2016

Jonathan M Scott, Andy Penaluna and John L Thompson

The purpose of this paper is to conduct a critical appraisal of how experiential approaches can more effectively enhance the achievement of desired learning outcomes in…

2172

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to conduct a critical appraisal of how experiential approaches can more effectively enhance the achievement of desired learning outcomes in entrepreneurship education. In particular, the authors critique whether actual learning outcomes can be profitably used to measure effectiveness; and consider how student performance can be evaluated through the twin lenses of implementation or innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors undertook a review of both traditional and experiential approaches to entrepreneurship education. In addition to comparing these approaches, the authors critiqued a number of “taken for granted” assumptions regarding the effectiveness of experiential approaches to entrepreneurship education and made recommendations.

Findings

Although there is a large body of research on experiential approaches towards entrepreneurship education, the authors know little about how these approaches contribute towards the effective achievement of desired learning outcomes. Whilst many authors claim that such approaches are effective, such assertions are not supported by sufficient robust evidence. Hence the authors need to establish more effective student performance evaluation metrics. In particular: first, whether actual learning outcomes are appropriate measures of effectiveness; and second, the authors should evaluate student performance through the lenses of the two “Is” – implementation or innovation.

Practical implications

Whether actual learning outcomes are used as a measure of effectiveness at all needs to be critiqued further. Implementation involves doing things that are determined by others and matching against their expectations, whereas innovation comprises producing multiple and varied solutions that respond to change and often surprise.

Originality/value

Through revisiting the discussions on the art and the science of entrepreneurship education, this paper represents an initial critical attempt – as part of an ongoing study – to fill a gap in entrepreneurship education research. The paper, therefore, has significant value for students, entrepreneurship educators and policy-makers.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 58 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 April 2020

Jayson Seaman, Robert MacArthur and Sean Harrington

The article discusses Outward Bound's participation in the human potential movement through its incorporation of T-group practices and the reform language of experiential

Abstract

Purpose

The article discusses Outward Bound's participation in the human potential movement through its incorporation of T-group practices and the reform language of experiential education in the late 1960s and early 1970s.

Design/methodology/approach

The article reports on original research conducted using materials from Dartmouth College and other Outward Bound collections from 1957 to 1976. It follows a case study approach to illustrate themes pertaining to Outward Bound's creation and evolution in the United States, and the establishment of experiential education more broadly.

Findings

Building on prior research (Freeman, 2011; Millikan, 2006), the present article elaborates on the conditions under which Outward Bound abandoned muscular Christianity in favor of humanistic psychology. Experiential education provided both a set of practices and a reform language that helped Outward Bound expand into the educational mainstream, which also helped to extend self-expressive pedagogies into formal and nonformal settings.

Research limitations/implications

The Dartmouth Outward Bound Center's tenure coincided with and reflected broader cultural changes, from the cold war motif of spiritual warfare, frontier masculinity and national service to the rise of self-expression in education. Future scholars can situate specific curricular initiatives in the context of these paradigms, particularly in outdoor education.

Originality/value

The article draws attention to one of the forms that the human potential movement took in educationexperiential education – and the reasons for its adoption. It also reinforces emerging understandings of post-WWII American outdoor education as a product of the cold war and reflective of subsequent changes in the wider culture to a narrower focus on the self.

Details

History of Education Review, vol. 49 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 July 2017

Ralph Nyadu-Addo and Mavis Serwah Benneh Mensah

Entrepreneurship education thrives on the pillars of experiential education. Using the case of the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology in Ghana, the purpose…

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Abstract

Purpose

Entrepreneurship education thrives on the pillars of experiential education. Using the case of the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology in Ghana, the purpose of this paper is to examine the entrepreneurship clinic (EC) as a viable pedagogy for the promotion of experiential education in entrepreneurship.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper relies on insider action research to analyse, within Joplin’s five-step model, the case of the EC at the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST), Ghana.

Findings

The analysis showed that the KNUST clinic comprises five main activities including preparation, orientation, selection and matching, coaching and monitoring and evaluation. In relation to Joplin’s five-step model, the first three stages of the clinic provide focus for the clinic while the remaining two stages – coaching and monitoring and evaluation – entail activities that are geared towards action, support, feedback and debrief. Through the clinic, thousands of tertiary students have been trained in entrepreneurship and new venture creation; some selected participants have been coached while others have had the opportunity to qualify for business incubation.

Research limitations/implications

Although the paper discusses some achievements of the clinic in relation to enrolment and fundraising, it does not assess the impact of the clinic on the entrepreneurial competencies, intentions and initiatives of participants, hence, these issues are recommended for future research.

Practical implications

The paper demonstrates that it is feasible to implement the EC methodology, irrespective of the cost and time implications that are often associated with experiential educational methodologies. However, support from university management, funding raising from internal and external sources and technical support from industry and government agencies are key to the sustainability of clinics.

Originality/value

The paper adds novelty to the entrepreneurship education literature by bringing to the fore how a university in an emerging African economy is implementing and managing the EC pedagogy.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 February 2022

Etinder Pal Singh, Jyoti Doval, Sanjeev Kumar and Malik Muhammad Sheheryar Khan

The gaps between what is taught in the classroom and what is required from the management graduates are evident globally. This research suggests that experiential learning…

Abstract

Purpose

The gaps between what is taught in the classroom and what is required from the management graduates are evident globally. This research suggests that experiential learning has the potential to address this pronounced gap and examines the impact of a long-term experiential learning project in marketing curricula on management graduates in emerging Indian economy. This paper aims to investigate whether experiential learning results in conceptual clarity and application skills, influence positive behavioral change in the students and at the same time make learning an enjoyable and productive experience for management graduates.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper examines the results of a full-term long experiential learning project designed for the graduate students of the introductory marketing course in the emerging economy of India. The assessment of the experiential learning project was undertaken by using a 14-item survey instrument post activity and analyzed results by using quantitative methods.

Findings

The results of the study indicate that incorporation of experiential learning project in marketing curricula offers an excellent opportunity for the educators to ensure a high level of engagement, involvement, motivation, interest and satisfaction among Indian students. The project led to more enjoyment and productivity as compared to regular lecture method and assignments. The project provided an opportunity to apply theoretical concepts and theory in a real-life setting.

Practical implications

This activity is ideal and relevant for marketing educators who are looking for a semester/term long experiential learning activity/group project to be conducted while teaching introduction to marketing course. This activity offers an excellent opportunity for educators to ensure that students are engaged, motivated and are ready to apply the marketing concepts. This activity can be used in both undergraduate- and graduate-level courses.

Originality/value

“Marketing Challenge,” a long duration (full-term) experiential learning project described in this paper, provides the students an opportunity to experience the new product development process from the product conception, development to selling the developed product. The authors perceive that in the coming future, educators will use experiential learning elements in the classrooms to achieve the learning outcomes of various management courses.

Details

Review of International Business and Strategy, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-6014

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 11 July 2014

Yuen-Ping Ho, Pei-Chin Low and Poh-Kam Wong

This paper investigates empirically the link between entrepreneurship education programs and students’ entrepreneurial behavior, with a particular focus on the distinction…

Abstract

This paper investigates empirically the link between entrepreneurship education programs and students’ entrepreneurial behavior, with a particular focus on the distinction between experiential and classroom-based education. We introduce a more refined measure of entrepreneurial engagement that combines entrepreneurship intention and actual steps taken to realize that intention. Using data from a survey of 836 students at the National University of Singapore (NUS), we utilize linear regression models to examine not only the direct effect of entrepreneurship education program participation on entrepreneurial engagement, but also its possible interaction effect with several psychological constructs drawn from the Theory of Planned Behavior. The results show that participation in university entrepreneurship programs, especially experiential-learning programs, has significant positive influence on students’ entrepreneurial engagement. Moreover, the effect of program participation is significantly moderated by the students’ attitudes and perceptions. The findings have important practical implications for universities in designing entrepreneurship programs on campus. The study supports the call to move toward hands-on experiential programs as a more effective way for educational institutions to influence students’ entrepreneurial behavior and encourage venture creation activity on campus. We also contribute to the literature by confirming the impact of entrepreneurship education not only on entrepreneurial intentions but also on the concrete steps taken by students toward venture creation.

Details

Innovative Pathways for University Entrepreneurship in the 21st Century
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-497-8

Keywords

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