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Article
Publication date: 20 September 2013

Lisa Schuster, Judy Drennan and Ian N. Lings

This study aims to employ the Model of Goal-Directed Behaviour (MGB) to examine the consumer acceptance of technology-based self-service (TBSS) for a credence service…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to employ the Model of Goal-Directed Behaviour (MGB) to examine the consumer acceptance of technology-based self-service (TBSS) for a credence service instrumental to a social goal. Credence services are increasingly delivered via self-service technology and in social marketing, the achievement of social goals can be contingent on consumer acceptance of these services. However, little is known about the determinants of acceptance and extant marketing literature fails to account for emotional and goal influences which are likely to be important.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors interviewed 30 young adults with self-reported stress, anxiety or depression as potential users of a self-help mental health service delivered via mobile phone. The data were analysed deductively and inductively with the assistance of NVivo.

Findings

The findings generally support using the MGB to enhance understanding of consumers' acceptance of TBSS. The paper also found evidence of the importance of maintenance self-efficacy, the self-evaluation of the ability to continue using the service, and a previously ignored element of consumer level competition that arises between alternatives that achieve the same goal.

Originality/value

This study is the first to examine factors that influence consumers' acceptance of TBSS for credence services aimed at achieving a social goal. It builds on understanding of consumer decision making in social marketing, particularly the influence of self-efficacy and competition. It also contributes to attitudinal research by providing initial evidence for deepening and broadening the MGB in the context of TBSSs.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 47 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 19 September 2008

Hyunsook Kim, Eun‐Young Rhee and Jaeyeol Yee

The purpose of this paper is to gain a better understanding of the “fashion process” by exploring and comparing fashion‐process networks and friendship networks in small…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to gain a better understanding of the “fashion process” by exploring and comparing fashion‐process networks and friendship networks in small groups of adolescents, and to explore the factors involved in the causation of “clothing leadership” and “popularity” in such groups.

Design/methodology/approach

Fashion‐process networks and friendship networks are investigated by sociometric nomination with respect to “clothing acceptance” and “social acceptance” in three age groups of Korean adolescents. The patterns and structures of the networks are analyzed using UCINET 6.0 and Netminer 2.6. Certain factors contributing to “clothing leadership” and “popularity” are measured using Likert‐type scales; these include “clothing interest,” “fashion interest,” and “perceived clothing acceptance.” Other factors of interest (such as “academic grade,” “facial attractiveness,” and “bodily attractiveness”) are rated by peer informants.

Findings

Fashion‐process networks are found to be more centralized and polarized than friendship networks. Clothing acceptance is related to peer acceptance and is found to occur within and across friendship links. Clothing leaders are not necessarily the most popular subjects. The most significant factor determining “clothing leadership” is found to be “facial attractiveness.”

Research limitations/implications

Social network analysis is exploratory in nature and the results cannot be statistically verified. However, a better understanding of the characteristics of fashion‐process networks in small groups assists in bridging the gap between individual adoption of fashion at the micro‐level and fashion diffusion in society at the macro‐level.

Practical implications

By illuminating the dynamics of the fashion process in small groups, the study is of assistance in developing marketing strategies that target adolescents.

Originality/value

The study is original in that fashion process in small groups of Korean adolescents is investigated by social network analysis of “clothing acceptance,” and then compared to friendship networks.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 26 February 2018

Sureni Weerasinghe and Menaka Chandanie Bandara Hindagolla

The purpose of this paper is to conduct a systematic review of studies that have used the technology acceptance model (TAM) in the context of social network sites (SNS)…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to conduct a systematic review of studies that have used the technology acceptance model (TAM) in the context of social network sites (SNS). It describes various studies undertaken to examine user behaviours and attitudes towards SNS.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper comprehensively reviews the selected literature associated with applications of TAM in the SNS context. Different studies conducted within the SNS context were evaluated for understanding the changes incorporated into the model.

Findings

The findings illustrated that the TAM has been successfully applied via its extension and modification for explaining user adoption and acceptance of SNS.

Originality/value

The study contributes to the theoretical novelty of the body of the existing literature in the domains of TAM and SNS. The study also provides insight on future research directions by helping in identifying gaps in literature in this field.

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Article
Publication date: 27 May 2021

Muhammad Talha Salam, Hamza Imtiaz and Muhammad Burhan

During the COVID-19 crisis, diversified attitudes and behaviors of structural equation modeling (SME) retailers were observed in using social media marketing that could…

Abstract

Purpose

During the COVID-19 crisis, diversified attitudes and behaviors of structural equation modeling (SME) retailers were observed in using social media marketing that could have helped mitigate the adverse effects of this crisis on businesses. This paper aims to present a thorough investigation of these perceptions and limited acceptance of social media marketing among SME retailers in a developing country during a crisis.

Design/methodology/approach

The investigation was designed using a mixed-method design. A qualitative investigation, as the first part, explored SME retailers’ perceptions of the use of social media marketing when they were faced with mandatory lockdown that stifled their business activity. The insights from qualitative study and literature helped devise the second part of the study, a quantitative study using the technology acceptance model (TAM). Analysis of responses from a sample of SME retailers (n = 149) was done using SEM in this study.

Findings

In the qualitative study, SME retailers were found to have a varying outlook toward social media marketing. Some ventured into social media marketing while others were impeded by their limited understanding. The second (quantitative) study showed the general applicability of TAM such that perceived ease of use through perceived usefulness influenced SME retailers’ attitudes toward the usage of social media marketing during the COVID-19 crisis. An important finding in both studies was that business owners’ education level influenced their perceptions of social media marketing.

Research limitations/implications

The investigation, albeit a comprehensive one, was conducted in a particular market and for SME retailers. This opens avenues for conducting similar studies in other segments of entrepreneurs to generate insights based on comparative analysis across segments and scenarios.

Originality/value

Limited or no marketing in the physical marketplace amid lockdown meant almost an existential crisis for entrepreneurs, especially SME retailers, in developing countries during the COVID-19 crisis. While technology acceptance by SME retailers has been discussed in the literature, there are limited discourses on technology acceptance among entrepreneurs and SME retailers during a crisis. These findings from the COVID-19 crisis explicate the possibilities and limitations of technology usage as a means to mitigate challenges faced by entrepreneurs during a crisis.

Details

Journal of Entrepreneurship in Emerging Economies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-4604

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Article
Publication date: 9 January 2017

M. Claudia tom Dieck, Timothy Hyungsoo Jung, Woo Gon Kim and Yunji Moon

This paper aims to propose and test a modified technology acceptance model for the social media networks (SMNs) in the luxury hotel context, integrating satisfaction and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to propose and test a modified technology acceptance model for the social media networks (SMNs) in the luxury hotel context, integrating satisfaction and continued usage intention, using a mixed-method approach. SMNs have revolutionized the way people communicate, search for information and share experiences. The technology acceptance model is the predominant theory for researching technology acceptance; however, there is a gap in identifying and testing context-specific constructs.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses a mixed-method approach. The researchers conducted 16 interviews and 258 questionnaires with luxury hotel guests. Following the collection of data, interviews and questionnaires were analyzed using thematic and partial least square analysis.

Findings

Findings show that accessibility, trust, social influence and perceived benefits influence perceived ease of use and perceived usefulness, which affect attitude and satisfaction and ultimately continued usage intentions. Findings also reveal that enjoyment, although qualitatively proposed, does not influence luxury hotel guests’ SMNs continued usage intention.

Practical implications

This study suggests that hotel managers have to concentrate their marketing efforts in enhancing SMN’s interaction and increasing the number of positive reviews to retain current customers and acquire new ones. Hotels should also develop effective mobile strategies by adopting mobile social network webs and applications, as accessibility becomes more important in today’s marketplace.

Originality/value

Former scholars adopted the approach of proposing external dimensions based on previous research and, thus, did not integrate up-to-date and context-specific variables. Therefore, the present paper uses a new approach by exploring SMN-specific dimensions and testing them in the luxury hotel context.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 29 April 2021

Laura Fuentes-Moraleda, Carmen Lafuente-Ibañez, Natalia Fernandez Alvarez and Teresa Villace-Molinero

The aim of this exploratory study is to identify the factors that influence the acceptance of social robots in museum environments and determine if this influence depends…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this exploratory study is to identify the factors that influence the acceptance of social robots in museum environments and determine if this influence depends on the visitor's profile (age, gender, education and occupation).

Design/methodology/approach

Data collected from an electronic questionnaire include 433 responses from Spanish visitors. The authors subjected the variables proposed by De Kervenoael et al. (2020) adapted to museums. The initial descriptive analysis only showed significant differences by age (under or over 30 years old). Based on these previous results, an exploratory factor analysis was carried out to test the applicability of the questionnaire to museums. After identifying the factors, the authors applied an ANOVA test to determine whether there are age-related differences between the factors related to robot acceptance in museums.

Findings

The authors developed a multidimensional instrument for measuring willingness to accept social robots in museum contexts. Willingness is determined by three factors: museum visitor experience (which is a factor specific to museums), empathy and personal engagement (which are both usually relevant in other tourist sectors as well). The younger individuals (under 30 years old) have a higher degree of acceptance than do visitors over 30.

Originality/value

Social robot use in museums is still very low, so the key factors for their acceptance have yet to be ascertained. The specific skills of social robots could prove to be a major draw for young people and contribute significantly to the future of museums.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Article
Publication date: 23 March 2021

Dongqing Zhu, Zhiying Zhang and Chunzhen Wang

It is generally believed that supervisors would deter employee unethical behavior. However, drawing from social exchange theory and the theory of moral disengagement, we…

Abstract

Purpose

It is generally believed that supervisors would deter employee unethical behavior. However, drawing from social exchange theory and the theory of moral disengagement, we posit that supervisors are more willing to tolerate employee unethical behavior through moral disengagement when the perpetrator is a high performing employee.

Design/methodology/approach

Study 1, which measured employee unethical behavior in a specific group of doctors through a time-lagged survey, and Study 2, which manipulated employee unethical behavior with a diverse sample by a vignette-based experiment, provided convergent support for our hypothesized 1st-stage moderated mediation model. Hierarchical regression, bootstrapping and ANOVA are used to test our hypotheses.

Findings

Although supervisors generally showed a low social acceptance of an employee who engaged in unethical behavior, they were more likely to socially accept the perpetrator through moral disengagement when the employee was a high rather than a low performer.

Practical implications

Given that supervisor's tolerance of employee unethical behavior may be more dangerous than employee unethical behavior itself, organizations should set up an ethics committee to handle top managers' unethical behavior and consider morality equally important with performance in management practice.

Originality/value

The current research extends research on the interpersonal consequences of employee unethical behavior, explains how moral disengagement promotes social acceptance and identifies the moderating effect of job performance in the process.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 36 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 28 September 2012

Seonghee Kim

The purpose of this study is to explore the acceptance and use of social software tools; in particular, the paper focuses on how the features of social software determine its use.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore the acceptance and use of social software tools; in particular, the paper focuses on how the features of social software determine its use.

Design/methodology/approach

This study identifies and uses three independent variables: intrinsic motivation, communication, and information/knowledge sharing. The dependent variables are based on the technology acceptance model (TAM) and include the perceived usefulness of social software and the perceived easiness of using social software. Using an online survey, data were collected from employees in government agencies (n=116) in Korea.

Findings

The results of a regression analysis show that both communication and knowledge sharing have a positive effect on the perceived usefulness of social software. However, the results did not statistically support intrinsic motivation as a crucial factor influencing the usefulness of social software. The findings also indicated that intrinsic motivation and communication are crucial factors in the ease of use of social software, while knowledge sharing is not significant statistically.

Research limitations/implications

There are some limitations in this study that need to be addressed. First, in this study, the subjects in the questionnaire survey were employees in Korean government related agencies. In addition, the survey was conducted by volunteers responding to the questionnaire. Thus, in other circumstances, the findings of this study may not be valid or generalizable due to a different social context and representative sampling.

Originality/value

The study implies that decision makers in software companies should support knowledge sharing activities and a variety of communication channels to transform a government agency into a social software community. In addition, the study shows that social software developers should consider enjoyment as a crucial factor for ease of use. Finally, the study found that the associations between the features of social software and South Korean government employees' characteristics for adopting social software can serve as a starting point for research projects involving government employees in other countries.

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Article
Publication date: 23 August 2011

Anandan Pillai and Jaydeep Mukherjee

The technology acceptance model (TAM) was developed by Davies et al. to understand the utilitarian benefits of web sites. In recent times, scholars have extended TAM as…

Abstract

Purpose

The technology acceptance model (TAM) was developed by Davies et al. to understand the utilitarian benefits of web sites. In recent times, scholars have extended TAM as theoretical underpinning to understand user acceptance of social networking web sites (SNWs) that were hedonic in nature, which seemed inappropriate. The purpose of this paper is to examine the differences in the user acceptance phenomenon of hedonic versus utilitarian SNWs, and highlight that it is essential to provide justice to varying value propositions offered by SNWs.

Design/methodology/approach

As the research study was variance based and followed a positivistic paradigm, the authors used survey methodology and collected data through online and offline questionnaires. In total, 181 usable responses were subjected to mediation analysis using structural equation modeling.

Findings

The perceived usefulness emerged as a significant mediator in the case of utilitarian SNWs and perceived enjoyment emerged as a significant mediator in the case of hedonic SNWs user acceptance phenomenon.

Research limitations/implications

One web site each from hedonic and utilitarian SNWs was considered for the study. Future studies may be conducted by incorporating multiple web sites in each category to further emphasize the findings. Also, future studies might study the user acceptance phenomenon on the theoretical underpinning of the unified theory of acceptance and use of technology, which is much comprehensive than TAM.

Practical implications

There seems to be a notion that SNWs need to be hedonic and offer entertainment value proposition to attract large number of users. However, SNWs with valuable utilitarian value propositions built around appreciable ideas would also be accepted by users as an efficient networking tool.

Originality/value

Research on user acceptance of SNWs has been focused mostly on hedonic SNWs like Facebook and MySpace, while user acceptance of utilitarian SNWs like LinkedIn and Ryze has remained an unexplored domain.

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Article
Publication date: 23 April 2020

Stephen Korutaro Nkundabanyanga, Moses Muhwezi, Doreen Musimenta, Sharon Nuwasiima and Grace Muganga Najjemba

This paper aims to show preliminary evidence of the link between the perceived low vulnerability of vital energy systems (LVRE) and social acceptance of renewable energy…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to show preliminary evidence of the link between the perceived low vulnerability of vital energy systems (LVRE) and social acceptance of renewable energy (SARE) while treating environmental opportunities and threats (EOPT), renewable energy technological innovations (TECH) and business model innovations as possible antecedents.

Design/methodology/approach

The objectives are delivered through a survey of 199 households (potential and actual customers/suppliers of electric power and renewable energy gadgets in Kampala and Wakiso districts of Uganda), and the data obtained were analysed using ordinary least squares (OLS) regression.

Findings

Both LVRE and EOPT, on their own, significantly predict SARE. TECH significantly mediate in the relation between EOPT and SARE. The highest form of SARE is market acceptance. Also, the current state of vulnerability of vital energy systems in the two Ugandan districts seems to espouse energy security as the real value of renewable energy. The study further finds that to deliver high SARE, there is a need to encompass potential user performance expectations of renewable energy technologies.

Research implications/limitation

Because the current results are from only two cities (districts) of Uganda and also based on a non-probability sample, generalizing them can be considered remote. In other words, it appears that more complex models need developing and testing in the future concerning LVRE and SARE. The present preliminary results are offered as a stimulus to such efforts. Well, it is expected, and, consistent with the diffusion of innovations theory (Rogers, 1995), that the population in Kampala and Wakiso districts are potential change agents (i.e. capable of influencing others in rural areas of Uganda).

Originality/value

The study estimates the direct and indirect effects to show how strongly TECH operate. Basing on OLS regression coefficients, the indirect effects are larger. Using the medgraph, we find probably for the first time, the adoption of technological innovation explains a significant part of the link between EOPT and SARE in the current study setting.

Details

International Journal of Energy Sector Management, vol. 14 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6220

Keywords

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