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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2000

Göran Svensson

A conceptual framework for the analysis of vulnerability in supply chains is developed. The conceptual framework is limited to the inbound logistic flow of manufacturers…

Abstract

A conceptual framework for the analysis of vulnerability in supply chains is developed. The conceptual framework is limited to the inbound logistic flow of manufacturers. The study has been performed as a two‐step process. Step one explores the concept of vulnerability from the point of view of an inductive approach. The conceptual framework is generated and based on the empirical findings from a case study of a Swedish car manufacturer in the automotive industry. Step two is deductive in terms of testing in other industries the generated conceptual framework that originates from step one. The conceptual framework consists of two dimensions, namely categories of disturbance and sources of disturbance. Principally, categories of disturbance are divided into quantitative and qualitative disturbances. Sources of disturbance are divided into atomistic (direct) and holistic (indirect) disturbances. In addition, the specific criteria of an inbound logistic flow indicate how vulnerability in supply chains is proposed to be analysed according to the developed conceptual framework of vulnerability.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 30 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2002

Göran Svensson

The reason for this research originates from the time‐ and functional dependencies between firms’ activities and resources in supply chains. These dependencies cause…

Abstract

The reason for this research originates from the time‐ and functional dependencies between firms’ activities and resources in supply chains. These dependencies cause vulnerability. The principal objective of this research is to conceptualize the construct of vulnerability in firms’ inbound and outbound logistics flows. The vulnerability construct of this research consists of two components: disturbance and the negative consequence of disturbance. This research is based upon a two‐phase process utilizing sequential triangulation. It is proposed that the vulnerability in the inbound logistics flows from sub‐contractors, and the vulnerability in the outbound logistics flows to customers, may be measured and evaluated by four principal dimensions, namely: service level, deviation, consequence and trend. In addition, a model of inbound and outbound vulnerability scenarios in supply chains is introduced for teaching and training purposes, as well as to position and compare the outcome of replication studies of vulnerability in firms’ inbound and outbound logistics flows.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 2 May 2017

Lorella Cannavacciuolo, Luca Iandoli, Cristina Ponsiglione and Giuseppe Zollo

The purpose of this paper is to explain the emergence of collaboration networks in entrepreneurial clusters as determined by the way entrepreneurs exchange knowledge and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explain the emergence of collaboration networks in entrepreneurial clusters as determined by the way entrepreneurs exchange knowledge and learn through business transactions needed to implement temporary supply chains in networks of co-located firms.

Design/methodology/approach

A socio-computational approach is adopted to model business transactions and supply chain formation in Marshallian industrial districts (IDs). An agent-based model is presented and used as a virtual lab to test the hypotheses between the firms’ behaviour and the emergence of structural properties at the system level.

Findings

The simulation findings and their validation based on the comparison with a real world cluster show that the topological properties of the emerging network are influenced by the learning strategies and decision-making criteria firms use when choosing partners. With reference to the specific case of Marshallian IDs it is shown that inertial learning based on history and past collaboration represents in the long term a major impediment for the emergence of hubs and of a network topology that is more conducive to innovation and growth.

Research limitations/implications

The paper offers an alternative view of entrepreneurial learning (EL) as opposed to the dominant view in which learning occurs as a result of exceptional circumstances (e.g. failure). The results presented in this work show that adaptive, situated, and day-by-day learning has a profound impact on the performance of entrepreneurial clusters. These results are encouraging to motivate additional research in areas such as in modelling learning or in the application of the proposed approach to the analysis of other types of entrepreneurial ecosystems, such as start-up networks and makers’ communities.

Practical implications

Agent-based model can support policymakers in identifying situated factors that can be leveraged to produce changes at the macro-level through the identification of suitable incentives and social networks re-engineering.

Originality/value

The paper presents a novel perspective on EL and offers evidence that micro-learning strategies adopted and developed in routine business transactions do have an impact on firms’ performances (survival and growth) as well as on systemic performances related to the creation and diffusion of innovation in firms networks.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2002

Göran Svensson

Originates from the time‐ and relationship‐dependencies between companies’ activities and resources in marketing channels which cause vulnerability. The construct of…

Abstract

Originates from the time‐ and relationship‐dependencies between companies’ activities and resources in marketing channels which cause vulnerability. The construct of vulnerability is still fairly unexplored in marketing channel research. Therefore, the principal objective of this research is to conceptualise the construct of vulnerability. Bases the conceptualisation on generic time‐ and relationship‐dependencies between companies’ business activities in marketing channels. This research is based on a mail survey in three different industries in Sweden. Develops and describes a typology of vulnerability scenarios based on a set of generic dimensions of time‐ and relationship‐dependencies between companies’ business activities in these industries. Uses a minor selection of broad items that empirically underpin the introduced typology. Further research has to be carried through in order to explore the validity and reliability of the empirical findings of this research note. Nevertheless, the contribution of this research is a tentative typology of vulnerability scenarios based upon time‐ and relationship‐dependencies between companies’ business activities in marketing channels.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 7 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 12 January 2010

Dave C.A. Butcher and Michael J. Sheehan

Within the UK construction industry, achieving compliance with output key performance indicators (KPIs) no longer represents excellent performance. Rather, such compliance…

Abstract

Purpose

Within the UK construction industry, achieving compliance with output key performance indicators (KPIs) no longer represents excellent performance. Rather, such compliance tends to be viewed as the minimum performance requirement on construction programmes. Within that paradigm shift, what needs to be understand is the customer's perspective of excellent performance. The purpose of this paper is to address these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing from semi‐structured interviews with some of the largest construction customers in the UK, this paper develops an understanding of the customer's perspective of excellent first‐tier contractor performance on a programme of construction projects.

Findings

From the customer's perspective, a number of key behaviours determine excellent contractor performance. These include: being open about their business strengths and weaknesses against their peer group; challenging and improving themselves without the need for prompting; demonstrably adding value; really listening and acting upon the messages being transmitted by the customer; demonstrating desire to learn and share learning as part of a community; delighting the customer's stakeholders and customers; consistency of message from employees at all levels; keeping business promises; aligning with the customer's culture; transferring individual knowledge to the collective; and demonstrating a keen understanding of the customer's business. This behavioural understanding has led to a shift in the way customers are interacting with their first‐tier contractors. Many of the performance facets mentioned are input or “lead” factors; or are about attitude and behaviour rather than pure construction competence. By managing at this level as opposed to the output KPI level, customers are to a varying extent influencing the way in which their contractors develop as businesses.

Practical implications

The findings have implications for contractors and customers undertaking, or procuring, a large programme of construction projects so that expectations are met.

Originality/value

Following the advice of this paper will lead to innovative relationships between customers and contractors.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2001

ADEKUNLE SABITU OYEGOKE

This study provides a framework for comparing construction management contracts in the UK and the US construction practices. It starts by reviewing previous studies on UK…

Abstract

This study provides a framework for comparing construction management contracts in the UK and the US construction practices. It starts by reviewing previous studies on UK and US contracting practices and explores the main delivery methods, inform of comparison with construction management contracting systems. It examines construction management contracting types, processes and procedures and interaction between the construction manager and other stakeholders. This study was based on a literature review and the result shows the similarities and differences between the American and British CM systems within each practice and between both practices; the distribution of responsibilities and risks both in pre‐construction and during the construction stages; and allocation of responsibility in both practices.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 8 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2005

Geoffrey Briscoe and Andrew Dainty

To empirically investigate the problems encountered in trying to integrate supply chains in the UK construction industry and to set these problems in the context of the…

Abstract

Purpose

To empirically investigate the problems encountered in trying to integrate supply chains in the UK construction industry and to set these problems in the context of the extensive literature on supply chain management and partnering.

Design/methodology/approach

A brief review of current supply chain issues in the construction industry is provided. Three case studies of leading construction clients were carried out and these included public and private organisations from different sectors of the economy, public transport, information and communications technology and vehicle manufacturing. A large number of interviews were conducted with the various clients, their main contractors and key subcontractors and suppliers.

Findings

The findings reveal that the large number of supply chain partners and the significant level of fragmentation limit the levels of integration that are achievable. The interplay of environmental and procurement related factors renders the realisation of truly integrated supply chains very problematic and difficult to achieve. Nevertheless the paper identifies some key principles that do need to be followed if the elusive goal of integration is to be eventually realised.

Research limitations/implications

While the present cases were chosen to be representative, they may not necessarily reflect the experiences of all clients and contractors in the construction industry.

Originality/value

This paper adds another dimension to the extensive body of knowledge that already exists on supply chain integration. In particular, it focuses on construction, a large and important sector of the economy but one that does not receive as much research interest as the manufacturing and distribution sectors.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2017

Rachel Griffiths, Wayne Lord and Jeremy Coggins

The purpose of this study is to identify building contractors’ views as to the need for, impact of and barriers to the use of project bank accounts (PBAs) in the UK…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to identify building contractors’ views as to the need for, impact of and barriers to the use of project bank accounts (PBAs) in the UK construction industry.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional research study was carried out by the use of questionnaires to collect quantitative data. The population for the research was of construction professionals working as full-time employees for either main (Tier 1) or specialist contractors (Tiers 2-4).

Findings

Contractors consider PBAs as an effective initiative to encourage fair payment. There is uncertainty, however, as to whether PBAs will result in project cost savings. Head contractor resistance is perceived to be the biggest barrier to the use of PBAs. Adoption of PBAs in private-sector construction projects is likely to be slow.

Research limitations/implications

The relative infancy of PBA usage in the construction industry means that responses are largely based on awareness as opposed to experience. Nevertheless, survey data represent a snapshot of contractors’ perceptions with respect to PBAs, which may be used as a benchmark against which to compare future studies to monitor how contractors’ views and expectations have changed with time.

Originality/value

The survey results will be of particular interest to those international jurisdictions who are considering, or who have already embarked on, the path of trialling and/or using PBAs in the public sector.

Details

Journal of Financial Management of Property and Construction, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-4387

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Article
Publication date: 5 January 2015

Miia Martinsuo and Rami Sariola

The purpose of this paper is to increase understanding on the emergence of mutually beneficial relationships between component suppliers and third parties in projects, and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to increase understanding on the emergence of mutually beneficial relationships between component suppliers and third parties in projects, and their interaction practices in the project and potential new services.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative, exploratory research strategy is employed in the context of construction projects, with construction component manufacturers as the focal component suppliers. In total 22 interviews were conducted with structural engineers and architects as relevant third parties, to discover the specifics of component suppliers’ third-party relationship development in construction projects.

Findings

The results show the crucial role of third parties in the constructor’s and customer’s decision-making process, and various ways for component suppliers to develop the relationship toward the third parties. The results offer important knowledge about the cooperation between construction component suppliers and third parties and means to increase the centrality of component suppliers in the project network.

Research limitations/implications

The research was delimited to structural engineers and architects as third parties in construction projects in one country. Further research is encouraged on third-party cooperation in other kinds of project networks, other kinds of third parties, and the various forms of triadic cooperation in project networks.

Practical implications

The results encourage component suppliers to take a proactive approach in developing relationships with third parties, when strengthening their network position. The paper introduces practical ways in which component suppliers may take action toward generating powerful main contractor-supplier-third-party triads.

Originality/value

Limited research attention has been directed at third parties and triadic cooperation in project networks. This paper offers important knowledge about the relationship between component suppliers and third parties, particularly in terms of third parties’ expectations and practical initiatives to enhance the relationships.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

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Article
Publication date: 3 October 2020

Karen Lorraine Wontner, Helen Walker, Irina Harris and Jane Lynch

This study aims to illuminate the challenges involved in implementing community benefits (CBs), a sustainable public procurement policy that ensures that there are…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to illuminate the challenges involved in implementing community benefits (CBs), a sustainable public procurement policy that ensures that there are positive social and economic outcomes for the local community when public money is spent on goods, works and services.

Design/methodology/approach

Interviews and focus groups were conducted with public sector buyers and suppliers in Wales with experience in implementing CBs. Resource dependence theory was used to examine the extent to which dependence on resources effects CBs implementation.

Findings

Whilst the study confirms that implementation of CBs improves economic and social outcomes, there can also be challenges for public sector organisations and their constituent supply chains. These include tensions between CBs and other policies, differing views between buyers and suppliers, and the unintended consequences of promoting one form of CBs over another.

Research limitations/implications

The research found that Welsh Government influences the buyer-supplier dyad through regulatory and financial power. We elaborate on resource dependency theory by adding four constructs (powerful stakeholders, intra and inter organisational issues, challenges and enablers) to better understand the flows of power and resources in this research context.

Practical implications

Buyer and supplier practitioners and policymakers may find the factors leading to successful CBs implementation useful, such as ensuring closer communication and liaison at early contract stages.

Social implications

Community benefits are aimed at improving socioeconomic issues through public procurement.

Originality/value

This study addresses the need for research into how public sector organisations and suppliers seek to implement socio-economic sustainability measures, and the lack of research on CBs implementation to date. It is also novel in adopting a dyadic approach and a resource dependency perspective.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 40 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

1 – 10 of 228