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Article
Publication date: 3 January 2020

James C. Fowler, Robyn Catherine Price, Kirsty Burger, Alice Jennifer Mattei, Ashley Mary McCarthy, Fiona Lowe and Thuthirna Sathiyaseelan

The use of mental health treatment requirements (MHTRs) has not proven to be successful at meeting the mental health needs of the probation population in the UK, largely through…

Abstract

Purpose

The use of mental health treatment requirements (MHTRs) has not proven to be successful at meeting the mental health needs of the probation population in the UK, largely through underuse of the requirement or lack of available services. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper investigates a method of meeting those needs without the use of MHTRs by embedding third sector services within the probation environment.

Findings

Results indicate a significant impact after a six-month follow-up in symptomology across measures of depression, anxiety, general distress and social functioning; also indicated is a significant result on recidivism, with 74 per cent of participants committing no further offences in the 12 months following treatment.

Originality/value

These results represent the only evaluation of embedded, third sector mental health services in a probation environment in the UK, and highlight a further need to embed specialist mental health services within the probation environment and generalise that practice to other forms of service structure and therapeutic methodology.

Details

Journal of Criminal Psychology, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2009-3829

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 19 October 2020

Sebastian J. Lowe, Lily George and Jennifer Deger

This chapter looks at what it means to set out to do anthropological research with tangata whenua (New Zealanders of Māori descent; literally, ‘people of the land’), from the…

Abstract

This chapter looks at what it means to set out to do anthropological research with tangata whenua (New Zealanders of Māori descent; literally, ‘people of the land’), from the particular perspective of a Pākehā (New Zealander of non-Māori descent – usually European) musical anthropologist with an interest in sound-made worlds. In late 2017, Lowe was awarded funding for a conjoint PhD scholarship in anthropology at James Cook University, Australia, and Aarhus University, Denmark. However, following advice from several colleagues in Aotearoa New Zealand, Lowe decided to assess the viability of the project with his prospective Māori and non-Māori collaborators prior to officially starting his PhD candidature. Throughout this process of pre-ethics (Barrett, 2016), Lowe met with both Māori and non-Māori to discuss the proposed PhD project; a ‘listening in’ to his own socio-historical positioning as a Pākehā anthropologist within contemporary Aotearoa New Zealand. This approach to anthropological research is in response to George (2017), who argues for a new politically and ethnically aware mode of anthropology that aims to (re)establish relationships of true meaning between anthropology and Māori in Aotearoa New Zealand.

Details

Indigenous Research Ethics: Claiming Research Sovereignty Beyond Deficit and the Colonial Legacy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-390-6

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 19 April 2022

Pam Lowe and Sarah-Jane Page

Abstract

Details

Anti-Abortion Activism in the UK
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-399-9

Book part
Publication date: 31 December 2010

The following is an introductory profile of the fastest growing firms over the three-year period of the study listed by corporate reputation ranking order. The business activities…

Abstract

The following is an introductory profile of the fastest growing firms over the three-year period of the study listed by corporate reputation ranking order. The business activities in which the firms are engaged are outlined to provide background information for the reader.

Details

Reputation Building, Website Disclosure and the Case of Intellectual Capital
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-506-9

Article
Publication date: 11 July 2016

Kassia Lowe and Fiona Hynes

The purpose of this paper is to address and understand recruitment difficulties into psychiatry; however, to date there is no published research with respect to forensic…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address and understand recruitment difficulties into psychiatry; however, to date there is no published research with respect to forensic psychiatry. Forensic psychiatry has always been considered to be a popular specialty amongst junior doctors and therefore the recent trend in local unfilled core training (CT) (junior doctor) posts and national reduced competition ratios for higher specialist training has triggered concern. The impact vacant CT posts within the Forensic Service may have on the future workforce must be considered. Further understanding of this trend is required.

Design/methodology/approach

A short statement-style survey addressing attitudes and opinions with respect to the field of forensic psychiatry was devised and distributed to all West Midlands core psychiatry trainees who attended post-graduate teaching (November 2014).

Findings

Response rate was 64 per cent. In total, 52 per cent of participants expressed an interest in the specialty, but only 13 per cent wished to pursue a career in forensic psychiatry. In total, 68 per cent of responses deemed forensic psychiatry to be a demanding speciality, with over 50 per cent perceiving forensic patients as difficult to work with. There were high rates of uncertain responses with respect to specialty work life. In total, 78 per cent of responses considered experience of the specialty to be useful.

Research limitations/implications

The method chosen to distribute the survey maximised response rate, but may have introduced a Hawthorne effect, as well as response bias, with the visual presence of the researcher. Participants were limited to those who attended teaching on the specified day. This could potentially skew results with an absence of opinions of non-attenders. It may be that characteristics and therefore attitudes and opinions of these two groups are different. A further limitation of the study is that opinions explored are limited to statements included within the survey.

Practical implications

The current views may represent stigma, negative media portrayal and misinformed opinions. Action must be taken to increase understanding, interest and experience. Increased exposure to the specialty needs to occur. This could occur as early as high school, using case-study exercises and career sessions. Teaching sessions, summer school placements and elective opportunities should be made available for medical students. At post-graduate level, taster days as well as earlier access to rotations may be a way forward.

Originality/value

Although entry into Forensic Higher Training remains comparatively competitive, the potential impact of vacant junior doctor (CT) posts within the speciality is concerning. This is likely to negatively influence recruitment into higher training, which may ultimately lead to decreased numbers of qualified forensic psychiatrists. Specialised care for such a risky and challenging patient group could thus be significantly compromised in the near future. Hence, it is vital to understand the current trend in order to act pre-emptively and address the underlying problems. To date no such research has been conducted.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 19 October 2020

Lily George, Lindsey Te Ata o Tu Macdonald and Juan Tauri

This chapter provides an overview of the volume, beginning with anecdotes from the editors. These anecdotes demonstrate the range of issues facing Indigenous scholars and…

Abstract

This chapter provides an overview of the volume, beginning with anecdotes from the editors. These anecdotes demonstrate the range of issues facing Indigenous scholars and researchers who choose to work with Indigenous participants and/or communities. Reference is made to Indigenous research sovereignty, honouring the immense work undertaken by previous Indigenous scholars, enabling many today to work effectively with their own people as well as other Indigenous groups. This is considered a courageous act, given the vulnerability this opens Indigenous peoples up to in terms of the change that is engendered and the criticism from external non-Indigenous researchers that has often arisen. The organisation of the volume into three parts is discussed, and this chapter ends with synopses of the following 16 chapters.

Details

Indigenous Research Ethics: Claiming Research Sovereignty Beyond Deficit and the Colonial Legacy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-390-6

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 1999

Debbie Kemmer

This paper examines the domestic division of labour in relation to food preparation in the early months of marriage/cohabitation. A total of 22 heterosexual couples from central…

1726

Abstract

This paper examines the domestic division of labour in relation to food preparation in the early months of marriage/cohabitation. A total of 22 heterosexual couples from central Scotland, all childless and in full‐time employment or education took part in in‐depth interviews shortly after setting up home together. In more than half of the cases, the woman prepared most of the main meals, seven couples took equal part in food preparation and in two cases the man was the main meal preparer. There was evidence of role conflict among those women who prepared most of the meals, and of a trade‐off between the disadvantage of the tasks’ burdens and the advantage of control over food choice. This represents a significant departure from earlier work on food preparation in households with dependent children, in which men rarely cooked main meals, and women showed little evidence of resentment and considerable deference to their partners’ tastes.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 101 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 1 March 2021

Andrew Creed, Ambika Zutshi and Brian L. Connelly

What leadership lessons in sustainability can be learned from historical clan survival stories that include elders' responses to survival events? We provide in this chapter…

Abstract

What leadership lessons in sustainability can be learned from historical clan survival stories that include elders' responses to survival events? We provide in this chapter analysis of stories of survival in which elders as leaders and advisers convey meanings and morals which serve as educative tools for their clans. The findings relate to current leadership style theories and align with principles of social, economic and environmental sustainability. By observations through an original framework and tabulation, the chapter concisely presents distilled wisdom for the management of current and future crisis events which may threaten supply chains and, consequently, short- and long-term sustainability. The findings are useful to several audiences, such as, organizational leaders, volunteers and community managers who are involved in crisis management and addressing its impact on employees and the broader community. The research also opens the pathway for academics to explore some new areas in survival management. Ultimately, we acknowledge the endeavours and achievements of our elders whose descendants we hope will appreciate the reflection of their contributions. It is the spirit of collaboration, sharing diverse experiences, as we all must do in a crisis, which we hope to learn from and share in the solutions moving forward to future events.

Details

Clan and Tribal Perspectives on Social, Economic and Environmental Sustainability
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-366-2

Article
Publication date: 28 December 2021

Claire McDonald, Fiona Seaman-Thornton, Che Ling Michelle Mok, Hanne Jakobsen and Simon Riches

Negative attitudes towards “personality disorder” are common among mental health professionals. This study aims to design a psychoeducational training targeting attitudes to…

Abstract

Purpose

Negative attitudes towards “personality disorder” are common among mental health professionals. This study aims to design a psychoeducational training targeting attitudes to “personality disorder” for staff working in a London psychiatric hospital. Its impact on staff attitudes was evaluated.

Design/methodology/approach

Mental health clinicians were recruited from five acute psychiatric wards. Feasibility of implementing the training was measured. A free-association exercise explored baseline attitudes to “personality disorder” and visual analogue scales assessed staff attitudes pre- and post-training. Content analysis of staff feedback was carried out.

Findings

Psychoeducational training was found to be feasible, well-attended and highly valued by ward staff (N = 47). Baseline results revealed negative perceptions of “personality disorder”. Post-training, significant improvements in understanding, levels of compassion and attitudes to working with service users with a diagnosis of a “personality disorder” were observed. Staff feedback highlighted desire for further training and support.

Research limitations/implications

The sample size was relatively small and there was no control group, so findings should be interpreted with caution.

Practical implications

The findings highlight the need for support for staff working with service users with diagnoses of “personality disorder” on acute psychiatric wards. Providing regular training with interactive components may promote training as a resource for staff well-being. Planning to ensure service users’ and carers’ views are incorporated into the design of future training will be important.

Originality/value

This study is innovative in that it investigates the impact of a brief psychoeducational training on “personality disorder” designed for mental health staff on acute psychiatric wards.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 May 2007

Elizabeth Smith and Fiona M. Ross

Understanding patients' experiences of their interactions with health services is an important step in building quality from within. The purpose of this article is to look at the…

4049

Abstract

Purpose

Understanding patients' experiences of their interactions with health services is an important step in building quality from within. The purpose of this article is to look at the possibilities for involving service users in the development of the National Health Service in England through the structure of integrated care pathways (ICPs).

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic literature review was undertaken to identify how patient experiences have been attained and used in three clinical areas: cataract care, hip replacement and knee arthroscopy. The information was weighted according to methodological criteria and synthesized according to the typical stages of each pathway. Key issues were summarised thematically across each pathway.

Findings

The findings relate to the use of patient views and experiences within organisational structures, service development, methodological research, education and training. The article identifies important issues of practical significance for involving service users in the planning and development of patient focused ICPs: such as the diversity of patients, perspectives of continuity, information and patient support and the need for methodological research.

Research limitations/implications

The review is limited in that the literature across all three pathways tends to report findings of small studies undertaken in one clinical service or setting and most studies are not randomised or controlled.

Originality/value

The literature identified by the review contains important messages for both NHS policy and future research to involve service users in the planned expansion and plurality of NHS care.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

1 – 10 of 38