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Book part
Publication date: 22 November 2019

Alexis T. Franzese, Kaitlin Stober and Amy L. McCurdy

Within the field of medical sociology, there is an extensive body of literature on notable family transitions and stages in the reproductive cycle, such as getting married…

Abstract

Within the field of medical sociology, there is an extensive body of literature on notable family transitions and stages in the reproductive cycle, such as getting married or becoming a parent, as they relate to mental health and well-being. However, the transition to becoming a completed family, that is, the process of determining or recognizing that one’s family is complete, is notably absent. In response to this empirical gap, this chapter presents findings from 114 semi-structured interviews with participants who reported having at least one child and who considered their family to be complete. First, the concept of “family completion” is introduced and conceptualized based on the qualitative considerations of participants and the contextual medical sociology literature. Then, thematic considerations around the process of family completion, related emotional preparations, and factors associated with mental health and well-being are explored. Findings suggest that family completion can be an important transitional period for parents and can be associated with emotional hardship for some individuals. Participants described experiencing conflict with their partner if they disagreed on the completion decision, frustration and sadness related to infertility, and/or feelings of loss or depression when completion was regarded as the end of a personal or familial life phase. This chapter concludes that creating a cultural context in which family completion is a recognized family transition period may spur intentional consideration among parents and promote the design of intervention services for parents experiencing changes in mental health or well-being.

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Reproduction, Health, and Medicine
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-172-4

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Article
Publication date: 15 June 2015

Carmen Orte, Lluís Ballester, Martí X. March, Joan Amer, Marga Vives and Rosario Pozo

The purpose of this paper is to first assess the long-term effects of the adaptation of the American Strengthening Families Programme in Spain (known as the Programa de

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to first assess the long-term effects of the adaptation of the American Strengthening Families Programme in Spain (known as the Programa de Competencia Familiar, translated into English as the Family Competence Programme (FCP)). The second aim is to identify family typologies and family changes regarding family competence over time. The paper’s initial hypothesis is that families have different behaviours and take advantage of the FCP in different ways.

Design/methodology/approach

Monitored applications of the FCP were conducted using a quasi-experimental design consisting of a control group and pre-test, post-test and two-year follow-up assessments. The sample was made up of 136 families who took part in the programme and another 18 who participated in the control groups. Validated instruments were applied to assess the methodological processes and the family assessments. A cluster analysis was undertaken to identify different family typologies and their evolution in relation to the FCP goals.

Findings

The FCP shows effective and consistent results over time for families in a variety of difficult situations, with important result maintenance. The longitudinal analysis (i.e. the two-year follow-up) demonstrates that the majority of changes identified (using the factors under consideration) maintained their relevance for most of the families, producing positive change.

Originality/value

There is little long-term evaluation or longitudinal analysis of family prevention programmes that are evidence-based and include cognitive-emotional content. This paper analyses the long-term evaluation of family prevention programmes and identifies the ways in which families change over time.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

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Book part
Publication date: 28 June 2016

Yuping Zhang

This study explores the impact of parents’ and children’s early expectations on children’s later school persistence and completion of compulsory and secondary education…

Abstract

This study explores the impact of parents’ and children’s early expectations on children’s later school persistence and completion of compulsory and secondary education, paying special attention to the parent-child agreement in early educational expectations. Results from analyzing longitudinal data from the Gansu Survey of Children and Families (GSCF) show that children often carry educational expectations quite different from their parents’. Consistent with previous research, children’s and their parents’ early expectations are strong predictors of children’s later educational attainment. More importantly, the analysis reveals that children benefit greatly when they share with their parents’ high expectations. Those children whose high expectations aligned with their parents fair best in later educational outcomes: They are more likely to complete compulsory education and secondary education. The combined determination of parents and children can help moderate the negative impact of poverty and facilitate children’s continued efforts in fulfilling their expectations. This positive impact holds even for children from the most impoverished families. This study points to the importance to recognize that there are non-material resources that family could provide to advance children’s education.

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Family Environments, School Resources, and Educational Outcomes
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-627-0

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Article
Publication date: 20 June 2016

Tara Flemington and Jennifer Anne Fraser

Nurse home visiting programmes designed to reduce the likelihood of child maltreatment in families at risk have been widely implemented in Australia and overseas. The…

Abstract

Purpose

Nurse home visiting programmes designed to reduce the likelihood of child maltreatment in families at risk have been widely implemented in Australia and overseas. The purpose of this paper is to examine the intensity and duration of maternal involvement in a nurse home visiting programme to prevent child maltreatment.

Design/methodology/approach

A retrospective, longitudinal design was employed. The clinical records of 40 mothers who had received nurse home visits following the birth of a new baby for at least six months, and had provided consent for their details to be accessed for research purposes, were selected for analysis. The influence of antenatal characteristics and well-being on maternal involvement in a nurse home visiting programme was examined using reliability of change indices.

Findings

Mothers with impaired family functioning reporting they experienced violence at home were more likely to leave the programme early and received fewer than the prescribed number of home visits compared to mothers who had been enroled into the programme for other complex psychosocial needs. At the same time, mothers enroled on the basis of impaired psychological functioning and who did not report violence in the home remained, and received more than the prescribed number of home visits over the course of their involvement.

Originality/value

Results showed that domestic violence increased the risk of poor engagement with a targeted nurse home visiting programme. At the same time, home visitors responded to complex individual and family needs by increasing the number of home visits accordingly. This theoretically based pilot research has helped to disentangle antecedents of maternal involvement and the subsequent impact on programme outcomes. Further investigation using a larger study sample is needed.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Saeed Zolfaghari and Erika V. Lopez Roa

To compare the performance of a new hybrid manufacturing system (HMS) with a conventional cellular manufacturing system (CMS). The hybrid system is a combination of the…

Abstract

Purpose

To compare the performance of a new hybrid manufacturing system (HMS) with a conventional cellular manufacturing system (CMS). The hybrid system is a combination of the cellular manufacturing and job shop.

Design/methodology/approach

A hypothetical manufacturing facility with eight machines and 20 parts is used as a case. Simulation models are developed for two manufacturing systems. A multi‐factor comparison is carried out to test the performance of the systems under different scenarios.

Findings

It was found that group scheduling rules (GSR) and the manufacturing system design factors have significant impact on the performance of the system. In particular, the hybrid system shows its best performance when the MSSPT GSR is applied, whereas the cellular system is superior when DDSI is implemented. The results also demonstrate that, by adding non‐family parts to the production schedule of the HMS, significant benefits in the performance measures can be attained.

Research limitations/implications

The conclusion cannot be generalized, as the result is dependent upon the input data and the size of the problem.

Practical implications

The application may be limited to certain industry sectors. Further studies may be needed to identify the appropriate industry.

Originality/value

While the majority of the literature focuses on either a job shop or a pure CMS, this paper has a distinctive approach that allows the combined use of both systems. This could be a useful transitional approach from one system to the other.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 17 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

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Book part
Publication date: 30 January 2013

Gary N. Marks

Since the early 1990s there has been a growing body of research on intergenerational income elasticities and correlations. One of the most prominent findings is that these…

Abstract

Since the early 1990s there has been a growing body of research on intergenerational income elasticities and correlations. One of the most prominent findings is that these associations are much higher in the United States (and the United Kingdom) than in Canada, Australia and many European countries. This finding is often interpreted as America being much less fair than other industrialized societies since the reproduction of economic inequalities is substantially stronger. This chapter questions these conclusions on the following grounds: (i) inconsistencies with other outcomes, such as socio-economic inequalities in student achievement, educational attainment, occupation attainment and the patterning of intergenerational occupational mobility, (ii) family income having weaker effects on educational attainment (which has substantial effects on earnings and income) than other parental characteristics and (iii) methodological issues such as estimates based on the concept of ‘permanent income’ and the use of instrumental variables. Even if the consensus estimate of 0.4 for the intergenerational correlation in the United States is accepted, it may not mean that the United States is unusually unfair due to larger regional differences in labour market returns and/or stronger associations between parents’ and their children's ability, ability and education attainment, and education and earnings.

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Class and Stratification Analysis
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-537-1

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Article
Publication date: 20 March 2017

Kelsey S. Dickson, Sasha M. Zeedyk, Jonathan Martinez and Rachel Haine-Schlagel

Well-documented ethnic disparities exist in the identification and provision of quality services among children receiving community-based mental health services. These…

Abstract

Purpose

Well-documented ethnic disparities exist in the identification and provision of quality services among children receiving community-based mental health services. These disparities extend to parent treatment engagement, an important component of effective mental health services. Currently, little is known about differences in how providers support parents’ participation in treatment and the degree to which parents actively participate in it. The purpose of this paper is to examine potential differences in both provider and parent in-session participation behaviours.

Design/methodology/approach

Participants included 17 providers providing standard community-based mental health treatment for 18 parent-child dyads, with 44 per cent of the dyads self-identifying as Hispanic/Latino. In-session participation was measured with the parent participation engagement in child psychotherapy and therapist alliance, collaboration, and empowerment strategies observational coding systems.

Findings

Overall, results indicate significantly lower levels of parent participation behaviours among Hispanic/Latino families compared to their Non-Hispanic/Non-Latino counterparts. No significant differences were seen in providers’ in-session behaviours to support parent participation across Hispanic/Latino and Non-Hispanic/Non-Latino families.

Research limitations/implications

These findings contribute to the literature on ethnic differences in parent treatment engagement by utilising measures of in-session provider and parent behaviours and suggest that further investigation is warranted to documenting and understanding ethnic disparities in parents’ participation in community-based child mental health treatment.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the evaluation of differences in parent treatment engagement through demonstrating the utility of an in-session observational coding system as a measure of treatment engagement.

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1995

Mohammad Z. Meybodi

Presents a hierarchical production planning (HPP) model thatintegrates aggregate‐type planning, family disaggregate planning,lot‐sizing, job scheduling and evaluation of…

Abstract

Presents a hierarchical production planning (HPP) model that integrates aggregate‐type planning, family disaggregate planning, lot‐sizing, job scheduling and evaluation of the final production plans into a complete planning and scheduling system. In‐corporation of a simple heuristic scheduling algorithm into the HPP model is the primary contribution. The scheduling routine schedules the jobs based on just‐in‐time (JIT) concept and provides detailed shopfloor information such as job tardiness, bottleneck work centres, capacity level, inventory or shortage level and number of set‐ups. This information is critical for effective shopfloor management. Experimental results indicate that the performance of the present model is better than the existing models in general. However, the model is truly superior under tight capacity conditions.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 15 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Book part
Publication date: 18 July 2018

Mengwei Tu

Abstract

Details

Education, Migration and Family Relations between China and the UK: The Transnational One-Child Generation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-673-0

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Article
Publication date: 5 March 2019

Bernard Cova, Per Skålén and Stefano Pace

Project marketing is the specific activity of companies selling projects-to-order. Interpersonal practice is known to be important in this type of marketing. While this…

Abstract

Purpose

Project marketing is the specific activity of companies selling projects-to-order. Interpersonal practice is known to be important in this type of marketing. While this interpersonal practice has been little studied, some previous research suggests that changes in the institutional macro environment have affected it. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to study today’s interpersonal practice in project business and how the institutional environment conditions it.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi-structured interviews were conducted with marketing managers at project-based firms in different business sectors in France and Sweden. Data collection and analysis was informed by grounded theory.

Findings

The paper identifies three types of interpersonal practice in project marketing, referred to as the transactional, the work-based and the socializing. Changes in these are explained in relation to the three institutional logics identified in the data: the market institutional logic of business ethics, the corporate institutional logic of rationalization and the family institutional logic of gender equality.

Research limitations/implications

Future studies can continue and broaden this work as it regards how the institutional conditioning of interpersonal practice varies with context.

Practical implications

By clearly categorizing the three types of interpersonal practice and their relative role today, companies can orient the activities of salespeople, business developers and other project marketers.

Social implications

The paper highlights how business ethics and gender equality have changed interpersonal practices in project marketing.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the current debate on project marketing by identifying three types of interpersonal practice and by illustrating how institutional logics condition and change these. The paper shows that extra-business activities are needed less than previous research has argued with regard to maintaining customer relationships in-between projects.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 34 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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