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Article

Augustina Chiwuzie and Daniel Ibrahim Dabara

Cost of construction of residential properties as well as its subsequent rent trends remain a major challenge to stakeholders in the property rental markets of emerging…

Abstract

Purpose

Cost of construction of residential properties as well as its subsequent rent trends remain a major challenge to stakeholders in the property rental markets of emerging economies. This study examined the relationship between housing construction costs and house rents fluctuations in Osogbo, Nigeria, to provide information for informed investment decisions.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted a survey, where three sets of questionnaires were administered on building contractors; estate surveyors and valuers and private residential property owners. The data required comprise the estimated average construction costs and average market rents for two and three-bedroom bungalows in the study area from 2008 to 2018. These data were respectively sourced from all the 15 firms of building contractors and 25 firms of estate surveyors and valuers in Osogbo, Nigeria. Stratified random sampling was employed to select 180 property owners from three medium-density residential districts of Osogbo. Secondary data on macroeconomic variables were sourced from the Central Bank of Nigeria. Data collected were analysed using descriptive and inferential statistical tools.

Findings

The authors found a significant positive relationship (0.749) between construction costs and house rents trends; both variables maintained ascending trends. Construction costs and house rents inflation rates exhibited random fluctuations with the former having a higher mean inflation rate (10.47%). However, the difference was not statistically significant (p-value = 0.317 > 0.05). Respondents identified consumer price index (CPI) inflation among other macroeconomic variables as the strongest predictor of both construction costs and house rents fluctuations. However, evidence from further analysis of the time series suggested otherwise.

Practical implications

The result confirms construction cost as one of the vital supply factors of the housing market, which is often pass through to house rents. The positive relationship between construction costs and house rents trends should trigger new development which, will, in turn, allow rental housing investments to expand into new areas with prospects for profits that could be earned by domestic and foreign investors.

Originality/value

This study to the best knowledge of the researchers is the first to relate housing construction cost to house rent in Osogbo, Nigeria; thereby adding to the body of knowledge in this field.

Details

Property Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

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Article

Falaq Assad Nazir, David John Edwards, Mark Shelbourn, Igor Martek, Wellington Didibhuku Didibhuku Thwala and Hatem El-Gohary

Housing completions in the UK have fallen to 125,000 annually, while government targets have risen to 300,000. This dramatic shortfall raises concerns as to whether…

Abstract

Purpose

Housing completions in the UK have fallen to 125,000 annually, while government targets have risen to 300,000. This dramatic shortfall raises concerns as to whether current traditional construction approaches remain appropriate. This study aims to compare the traditional approach with modular construction, with a view to assessing whether a shift in construction systems offers the potential to alleviate the UK's domestic housing crisis.

Design/methodology/approach

A comprehensive interpretivist review of the available relevant literature is undertaken on construction methods within the UK; advantages and disadvantages. A bibliometric analysis is conducted to extract trends and findings relevant to the comparison at hand. The database is Web of Science; the analysis software is the VOS viewer.

Findings

The research illustrates that the UK housing market is in a state of crisis. A toxic combination of a rising UK population combined falling rates of housing delivery has resulted in an ever-widening housing supply gap. The construction industry’s capacity to meet this observed dearth in supply is further exacerbated by a number of chronic factors such as: falling participation in the construction sector workforce; lowering skill levels; reducing profitability; time to delivery pressures; and cost blow-outs.

Originality/value

While much information on the various construction methods are available, including comparative material, this study is the first to assemble the various comparative parameters regarding traditional and modular UK residential construction in one place. Thus, this study provides a definitive assessment of the relative advantages and disadvantages of these forms of construction.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

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Article

Tharaka Gunawardena, Tuan Ngo, Priyan Mendis, Lu Aye and Robert Crawford

With many natural disasters such as earthquakes, cyclones, bushfires and tsunamis destroying human habitats around the world, post-disaster housing reconstruction has…

Abstract

With many natural disasters such as earthquakes, cyclones, bushfires and tsunamis destroying human habitats around the world, post-disaster housing reconstruction has become a critical topic. The current practice of post-disaster reconstruction consists of various approaches that carry affected homeowners from temporary shelters to permanent housing. While temporary shelters may be provided within a matter of days as immediate disaster relief, permanent housing can take years to complete. However, time is critical, as affected communities will need to restore their livelihoods as soon as possible. Prefabricated modular construction has the potential to drastically improve the time taken to provide permanent housing. Due to this time-efficiency, which is an inherent characteristic of modular construction, it can be a desirable strategy for post-disaster housing reconstruction. This paper discusses how prefabricated modular structures can provide a more time-efficient solution by analysing several present-day examples taken from published post-disaster housing reconstruction processes that have been carried out in different parts of the world. It also evaluates how other features of modular construction, such as ease of decommissioning and reusability, can add value to post-disaster reconstruction processes and organisations that contribute to the planning, design and construction stages of the reconstruction process. The suitability of modular construction will also be discussed in the context of the guidelines and best practice guides for post-disaster housing reconstruction published by international organisations. Through this analysis and discussion, it is concluded that prefabricated modular structures are a highly desirable time-efficient solution to post-disaster housing reconstruction.

Details

Open House International, vol. 39 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

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Article

Mohammed Arif and Charles Egbu

The purpose of this paper is to establish manufactured construction as a good potential alternative to meet the growing housing needs of China.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to establish manufactured construction as a good potential alternative to meet the growing housing needs of China.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses literature review and case study as research methodologies. Literature review is used to identify the need for housing and establish the manufacturing prowess of China. The case study is used to look at how a similar problem has been tackled in the UK and then the case study findings are used to identify future direction for China.

Findings

Findings suggest that there is an acute shortage of housing in China, and at the same time the manufacturing sector in China is very strong. Therefore, in order to meet the housing demand for the population, manufactured construction offers a very attractive and cost‐efficient alternative.

Practical implications

Manufactured construction is an attractive alternative for China and therefore the government needs to encourage this sector through subsidies and tax benefits. Given that currently China is regarded as a manufacturing powerhouse, it will be relatively easy to establish manufactured construction as an organised and supported sector by the government.

Originality/value

The paper presents manufactured construction as an attractive alternative and strategic direction that China should adopt to meet the growing housing needs of the citizens. This also would appear to be an obvious alternative, given the manufacturing capabilities of China.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 17 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

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Article

Daniel O'Neill and Samantha Organ

The purpose of this paper is to explore academic papers and reports and present a chronology of the evolution of British low-rise prefabricated housing. The paper provides…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore academic papers and reports and present a chronology of the evolution of British low-rise prefabricated housing. The paper provides chronological information for construction and surveying researchers undertaking research in associated areas.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a qualitative literature review, providing an exploration and analysis of academic papers and reports on low-rise prefabricated housing.

Findings

A substantial literature was discovered. However, there are gaps in the available literature. The history of British construction technology is a rich research area but is under-researched. Prefabricated housing has a long history dating back to the eleventh century. Stigmatised from the failures of housing in the twentieth century, it is being increasingly used again in the twenty-first century when considering mass housing supply.

Research limitations/implications

This paper provides researchers with an overview of the history of low-rise prefabricated housing in Britain. It is not a comprehensive in-depth study; such would require numerous larger individual studies.

Originality/value

From reviewing literature it was evident that there was a broad literature, but there was no single journal publication exploring the evolution of British low-rise prefabricated housing. The research provides an overview, exploration and analysis of the literature while providing a chronology. The evolution of prefabricated housing is chronologically presented. Areas for further research are also recommended.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

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Article

Daniel O'Neill, Louis Gunnigan and Peter Clarke

The purpose of this paper is to present information on the construction technology used to build Dublin City Council’s (DCC’s) housing stock, with an emphasis on wall…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present information on the construction technology used to build Dublin City Council’s (DCC’s) housing stock, with an emphasis on wall construction.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology applied was a mix of literature review and archival research. The research was undertaken as part of PhD research exploring the energy upgrade of a housing stock.

Findings

The research uncovered details of the construction technology used in the construction of DCC’s housing stock, especially wall construction. These details disprove perceptions and assumptions made on the evolution of construction technology in Dublin and Ireland.

Research limitations/implications

The research is limited in that it primarily focused on the period between 1887 to the introduction of the 1991 Building Regulations. Further research is required on both DCC’s housing stock and the Irish housing stock to identify the specific changes in construction technology.

Practical implications

It is hoped this research will be a foundation for further research on the evolution of house construction technology, and housing stock asset intelligence in Ireland.

Originality/value

This research provides information for researchers and professionals with an interest in the evolution of Irish house construction technology. This is an area which has not received significant attention in Irish built-environment research.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

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Article

J. McCord, M. McCord, P.T. Davis, M. Haran and W.J. Rodgers

The purpose of this paper is to investigate delay factors within private housing construction in Northern Ireland. Delays are inherent throughout the construction industry…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate delay factors within private housing construction in Northern Ireland. Delays are inherent throughout the construction industry and create major difficulties in terms of project performance and client satisfaction. Whilst a voluminous body of international literature has investigated pertinent delay factors within construction projects, there is a relative paucity of research which offers a more delineated exploration of delay factors affecting private housing development schemes, particularly in the UK context.

Design/methodology/approach

This study applies questionnaire survey research to examine the relative importance of 75 delay attribute factors for housing construction projects in Northern Ireland. The approach applies both a relative rank and principal component analysis to distil the key factors impinging upon the delay process in housing construction.

Findings

The key finding from this research is that delays within the housing construction sector in Northern Ireland can be attributed to deficiencies in site management, ineffective communication strategies and a lack of coordination between key stakeholders involved in the construction process.

Originality/value

The study adds to the existing knowledge base and provides stakeholders with information on factors, which, if properly risk assessed and understood, can improve housing construction performance. The findings are of relevance to construction industry practitioners, policy makers and researchers with lessons learned serving as a basis for future policy development as well as affording an information platform for improving the efficiency and expediency of housing provision internationally.

Details

Journal of Financial Management of Property and Construction, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-4387

Keywords

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Article

Eder Martinez, Carolina K. Reid and Iris D. Tommelein

The purpose of this paper is to explore opportunities and barriers to using lean construction to address issues related to the value, quality and scalability of affordable…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore opportunities and barriers to using lean construction to address issues related to the value, quality and scalability of affordable housing production in Latin America.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents a case study of a housing developer in Ecuador that used lean construction in the design and construction stages of an affordable housing project. The study describes how the developer addressed operational challenges derived from implementing a customization strategy and analyzes qualitative and quantitative data to assess the outcomes of lean initiatives.

Findings

The developer reduced cost and delivery time without sacrificing consumer choice. However, the economic and policy conditions worked against the benefits of lean construction, demonstrating the importance of the regulatory context in facilitating or inhibiting lean initiatives and construction innovation.

Research limitations/implications

This paper focuses on conventional means for new housing construction. Self-help and upgrading are not covered.

Practical implications

The operational challenges described in this study, as well as the innovative ways to deal with them, are beneficial for practitioners seeking to improve the quality and efficiency of affordable housing construction.

Social implications

This paper advances knowledge about how to increase value and quality delivery in the built environment which may benefit low-income families.

Originality/value

This study bridges construction innovation and housing policy, discussing the potential of lean construction within the policy and regulatory environment in which affordable housing takes place.

Details

Construction Innovation , vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

Keywords

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Article

Oliver Bischoff and Wolfgang Maennig

Between 1997 and 2005, the German government provided owner‐occupied subsidies to fund new private housing construction and stock purchases to increase owner‐occupied…

Abstract

Purpose

Between 1997 and 2005, the German government provided owner‐occupied subsidies to fund new private housing construction and stock purchases to increase owner‐occupied housing. The purpose of this paper is to analyse the impact of these subsidies on total housing construction for the 1997‐2007 period using regionalised data. This paper tests for differences between counties and cities and examines whether local participation in housing programs is related to regional migration and fertility. Based on the dynamic results, short‐ and long‐run elasticities with respect to the subsidy program are calculated.

Design/methodology/approach

A balanced panel data set is used that covers approximately 95 percent of all German NUTS‐3 regions (counties and independent cities) for the 1997‐2007 period. To control for serial correlation, possible endogenous relationships and omitted variable bias problems, the System Generalised Methods of Moments estimation technique is applied.

Findings

A significantly positive impact of subsidised construction is detected in counties with an elasticity of approximately 0.2 in the short run and 0.48‐0.58 in the long run. The elasticities in independent cities are significantly lower, at 0.11 and 0.32‐0.37, respectively. No significant effect of migration on construction was found, in contrast to a significantly positive effect of fertility, especially at the county level. The estimates suggest a significantly negative effect of subsidised stock purchases on total construction.

Research limitations/implications

Tests for other countries using regional data on interest rates, construction costs and housing prices could lead to further insights.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that further owner‐occupied subsidy programs should be geared toward families or larger households. It also seems important to provide sufficient building land to enable households to make use of housing construction subsidies.

Originality/value

This is the first regional paper to examine housing construction elasticities with respect to a subsidisation program for housing construction and stock purchases that was designed for virtually all households in a country. It is also the first paper to test for differences in participation in a large‐scale, national housing program related to migration and fertility.

Details

Journal of European Real Estate Research, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-9269

Keywords

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Article

Dimitrios Staikos and Wenjun Xue

With this paper, the authors aim to investigate the drivers behind three of the most important aspects of the Chinese real estate market, housing prices, housing rent and…

Abstract

Purpose

With this paper, the authors aim to investigate the drivers behind three of the most important aspects of the Chinese real estate market, housing prices, housing rent and new construction. At the same time, the authors perform a comprehensive empirical test of the popular 4-quadrant model by Wheaton and DiPasquale.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, the authors utilize panel cointegration estimation methods and data from 35 Chinese metropolitan areas.

Findings

The results indicate that the 4-quadrant model is well suited to explain the determinants of housing prices. However, the same is not true regarding housing rent and new construction suggesting a more complex theoretical framework may be required for a well-rounded explanation of real estate markets.

Originality/value

It is the first time that panel data are used to estimate rent and new construction for China. Also, it is the first time a comprehensive test of the Wheaton and DiPasquale 4-quadrant model is performed using data from China.

Details

International Journal of Housing Markets and Analysis, vol. 10 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8270

Keywords

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