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Article
Publication date: 17 December 2018

Hannah Vivian Osei, Ahmed Agyapong and Kwame Owusu Kwateng

Interest has been generated for a while in unpacking the “black box” and providing a contingency approach to understanding the effects of human resource management (HRM…

Abstract

Purpose

Interest has been generated for a while in unpacking the “black box” and providing a contingency approach to understanding the effects of human resource management (HRM) practices. This study aims to investigate the possibility that the relationship between human capital development and task performance is mediated by work self-efficacy and work engagement – and that this mediation depends on the degree of perceived investment in employees’ development.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a synthesis of theories –systems, social cognitive and social identity theories – a moderated mediation model is tested using data from 220 academic employees and Heads of Departments from multiple Higher Educational Institutions in Ghana. AMOS and Hayes Conditional Process analysis were used to analyze the data.

Findings

The study finds support for a bundle of human capital investments boosting work self-efficacy and motivating work engagement, as well as task performance. Consistent with expectations, the mediation in human capital investments to task performance via work self-efficacy is conditional on the degree of perceived investment in employees’ development.

Originality/value

The study provides the first attempt at studying a conditional process model in human capital development by addressing whether, how and when human capital system functions more or less effectively, and provides knowledge on the “black box” in HRM.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 23 December 2020

Mohamed Asmy Mohd Thas Thaker, Md Fouad Amin, Hassanudin Mohd Thas Thaker, Ahmad Khaliq and Anwar Allah Pitchay

The present paper aims to propose a viable alternative model for human capital development (HCD), termed as the integrated cash waqf micro enterprises investment (ICWME-I…

Abstract

Purpose

The present paper aims to propose a viable alternative model for human capital development (HCD), termed as the integrated cash waqf micro enterprises investment (ICWME-I) model, which is expected to contribute to the development of micro enterprises in Malaysia.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a conceptual paper for the development of the ICWME-I model. It is purely qualitative in nature, using content analysis. It comprehensively reviews the literature related to HCD issues faced by micro enterprises and existing studies related to cash waqf (Islamic endowment) to construct the ICWME-I model.

Findings

The proposed ICWME-I model is specially designed for HCD of micro enterprises. It is an appropriate initiative to upgrade micro enterprises through HCD programmes by ensuring proper utilization of cash waqf funds to build modern training centres at subsidized costs with state-of-the-art facilities. The training centres would subsidize the participation fees of micro enterprises and provide them with facilities to undertake education and training programmes, as well as other kinds of activities for upgrading, improving and enhancing human capital capacity and skills of micro enterprises. The potential challenges of the ICWME-I model are also highlighted in this study.

Research limitations/implications

This paper attempts to construct the ICWME-I model based on an extensive review of literature related to micro enterprises, cash waqf and HCD. Among its major limitations is the fact that the ICWME-I model is not empirically validated and tested in this research. This can be carried out in future studies.

Practical implications

The present study could have an enormous impact on micro entrepreneurs via HCD programmes. The most important impact would be on government budgets, as this ICWME-I model is expected to generate its own funds from cash waqf for micro enterprises’ HCD.

Originality/value

This paper brings forward an original and viable model to develop human capital for micro enterprises development. This model involves the building of training centres using cash waqf raised from donors.

Details

ISRA International Journal of Islamic Finance, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0128-1976

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Article
Publication date: 15 May 2007

Hooi Lai Wan

The aim of this article is to gain insight into some of the human capital development (HCD) policies that enhance employee satisfaction. A salient focus of the study is to…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this article is to gain insight into some of the human capital development (HCD) policies that enhance employee satisfaction. A salient focus of the study is to assess whether employees in globalised foreign‐owned MNCs are likely to be more satisfied with the HCD policies than with the practices employed by locally owned MNCs.

Design/methodology/approach

Specifically, four MNCs in the chemical industry, which were selected based on equity ownership, were analysed to ascertain whether employees in these MNCs in Malaysia are satisfied with the HCD policies by providing an account of the satisfaction level of the employees with the HCD policies in these four Malaysian MNCs.

Findings

A main conclusion from the findings of this research is that respondents in European MNCs are generally more satisfied than respondents in Asian‐owned MNCs with the HCD policies of the company. On the whole, European MNCs place more importance in HCD but it cannot be concluded that foreign‐owned MNCs have better HCD policies and hence higher employee satisfaction with the HCD policies compared with locally owned MNCs.

Research limitations/implications

Similar research could be conducted on a larger sample, incorporating MNCs of different equity ownership, to determine how HCD policies of globalised MNCs affect employee satisfaction. Further research could be extended to different regions and sectors.

Practical implications

It provides an insight of desirable HCD practices that human capital practitioners could develop to create competitive advantage through their human capital assets.

Originality/value

In addition to identifying the relevant HCD practices, commentary is provided of current knowledge in terms of best HCD practices that could be emulated by local organisations as well as other institutions in the Asia Pacific region.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Article
Publication date: 17 May 2021

Stanley Emife Nwani

The purpose of this study is to examine the interactive role of human capital development (HCD) in foreign aid-growth relations in South Asia and sub-Saharan Africa…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the interactive role of human capital development (HCD) in foreign aid-growth relations in South Asia and sub-Saharan Africa countries from 1985–2019.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used panel data that cut across all countries in South Asia and sub-Saharan Africa collected from The World Bank’s Development Indicators. The data were analysed using Bai and Ng panel unit root idiosyncratic cross-sectional tests and the system generalised method of moments (SGMM).

Findings

The study found that foreign aid and HCD have negative impacts on economic growth. Fortunately, the interaction of human capital with foreign aid reduces the extent to which foreign aid impedes economic growth. The presumption is that South Asia and sub-Saharan Africa economies had not reaped the potential growth effect of foreign aid inflows due to high illiteracy rates and weak social capacities. The peculiarity of these regions hinders the absorptive capacity to transform positive externality associated with foreign aid into sizeable economic prosperity.

Practical implications

It is imperative for South Asia and sub-Saharan Africa countries to not depend on foreign aid; instead, the strategic action by policymakers should be to developing sustainable social capacities with HCD as the centre-piece.

Originality/value

The highpoint of this study is its inter-regional approach and the interplay between human capital and foreign aid using the second generation panel unit root estimator and the SGMM approaches.

Details

International Journal of Development Issues, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1446-8956

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 12 February 2021

Norizan Azizan, Faizuniah Pangil and Md. Lazim Mohd. Zin

Malaysia has shifted from a labor-intensive, agriculture-based economy since its independence in 1957 to a knowledge and innovation-based economy. Human capital development

Abstract

Malaysia has shifted from a labor-intensive, agriculture-based economy since its independence in 1957 to a knowledge and innovation-based economy. Human capital development (HCD) is a key enabler for driving and sustaining Malaysia's socioeconomic growth. The education and training system is the main platform for HCD intervention. To sustain and achieve goals, long-term survival, competitive advantage, and sustainability, the workforce is optimized through comprehensive HCD interventions to provide the necessary knowledge, skills, and competencies needed to work effectively in a rapidly changing and complex environment. Numerous efforts have been made by the government to ensure that the education and training system has the capacity to enhance the quality and availability of intellectual and skilled human capital to support the transition toward knowledge-intensive activities, sustain economic growth, and compete in the global market. The country's development plans and policies as well as the economic development which lead toward a knowledge-based economy with a knowledge-based workforce have charted out clear transformation journeys for the development of the human capital ecosystem. This chapter presents an overview of the landscape of HCD in Malaysia. Relevant reports, plans, policies, and strategies to strengthen human capital through education and training is reviewed. Finally, a few issues and challenges that Malaysia experiences are discussed.

Details

Modeling Economic Growth in Contemporary Malaysia
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-806-4

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Article
Publication date: 11 February 2019

Hammed Oluwaseyi Musibau, Agboola Hammed Yusuf and Kafilah Lola Gold

The purpose of this paper is to empirically investigate the relationship between foreign capital inflows, human capital development (HCD) and economic growth in ECOWAS countries.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to empirically investigate the relationship between foreign capital inflows, human capital development (HCD) and economic growth in ECOWAS countries.

Design/methodology/approach

In line with the augmented Solow model, the relationship between foreign capital inflows, human capital development and gross domestic product in the ECOWAS member countries is investigated using the pool mean group method.

Findings

The authors find overwhelming evidence that foreign capital inflows and human development have a significant effect on economic growth in ECOWAS member countries. However, foreign direct investment (FDI), official development assistant, HCD and gross domestic investment are positively related to economic growth in sub-regions economies. Conversely, migrate official remittance, portfolio investments and external debts are negatively related to economic growth.

Research limitations/implications

The authors recommend that sound economic policies should be targeted in encouraging foreign capital accumulation and HCD, especially on FDI, official development assistance that exerts a positive impact on the economic growth of the sub-region. Therefore, training is required to prepare the labor force to work with new technologies and promote efficient enterprise for ECOWAS economies to compete with developed countries and emerging economies.

Social implications

This study argued that the development of human capital is a pathway that may lead countries away from sustained growth. In the context of any economy which lack well-developed capital and education markets, many otherwise qualified citizens may be denied the basic skills they need in order to contribute fully to the nation’s economic development. HCD would encourage foreign investments, resulting in reduction in poverty in ECOWAS countries.

Originality/value

Several studies have been done on foreign capital inflow and economic growth nexus such as Orji et al. (2014), Ajide and Raheem (2016), Musibau et al. (2017), etc.; however, none of the research studies has actually examined the effect of the relationship between foreign capital inflows and HCD on economic growth in ECOWAS countries. This study is designed to fill the vacuum.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 46 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 April 2016

Ogechi Adeola

The purpose of this paper is to identify weaknesses in human capital development (HCD) in the hospitality industry in Nigeria and to find implementable solutions.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify weaknesses in human capital development (HCD) in the hospitality industry in Nigeria and to find implementable solutions.

Design/methodology/approach

The author draws on the literature on HCD and the hospitality industry, as well as her experience working with practitioners to enlighten the discussion.

Findings

Deficiencies in HCD in the Nigerian hospitality industry are the result of a lack of sound and forward-thinking educational development, lack of a supportive environment for the meaningful employment of graduates of the educational system and social bias against vocational education, as well as inadequate hospitality skills of employees, insufficient empowerment or support from the government and hospitality industry participants.

Practical Implications

This paper summarises the key issues in HCD in the hospitality industry in Nigeria and the implementable solutions. The roles of the government, society and the hospitality industry are highlighted to demonstrate that HCD in the industry is a collective responsibility.

Originality/value

HCD has increasingly been a prominent goal of research policy in Nigeria and elsewhere but has not yet engendered much discussion in the hospitality literature.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 April 2016

Belinda Nwosu and Trevor Ward

The purpose of this paper is to review contributions made to the strategic question about human capital development issues in the hotel industry in Nigeria and how they…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review contributions made to the strategic question about human capital development issues in the hotel industry in Nigeria and how they can be addressed.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the strategic question, a critical analysis of each contribution was carried out to identify the key themes, and then the issues, impacts and proposed solutions related to each theme.

Findings

The findings show eight key themes related to the human capital development question in the hotel industry in Nigeria.

Research limitations/implications

The findings create a framework to kick-start a conversation by all stakeholders in the hotel industry in Nigeria. The lack of reliable data in many areas is a limitation in reaching empirically based quantitative conclusions. It would be useful to include a wider range of stakeholders in the conversation.

Originality/value

All ten articles have contributed different perspectives to the conversation; all confirm that an engagement of all industry stakeholders is critical if a sustainable resolution is to be achieved.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 17 May 2018

Laura Barasa, Patrick Vermeulen, Joris Knoben, Bethuel Kinyanjui and Peter Kimuyu

Countries in Africa have a common goal policy of industrialisation that is expected to be driven by investing in innovation that yields efficiency. The purpose of this…

Abstract

Purpose

Countries in Africa have a common goal policy of industrialisation that is expected to be driven by investing in innovation that yields efficiency. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the technical efficiency effects arising from innovation inputs including internal R&D, human capital development (HCD), and foreign technology adoption in manufacturing firms in Africa.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses cross-sectional firm-level survey data from the 2013 World Bank Enterprise Survey and the linked 2013 Innovation Follow-up Survey. A heteroscedastic half-normal stochastic frontier is used for analysing the technical efficiency effects of innovation inputs of 418 firms.

Findings

This study reveals that internal R&D, and foreign technology have negative effects on technical efficiency. Notwithstanding, the combination of foreign technology and internal R&D, and foreign technology and HCD reinforce each other’s effects on technical efficiency.

Practical implications

This study provides evidence that whereas individual innovation inputs may not yield positive efficiency outcomes, the combination of absorptive capacity enhancing inputs comprising internal R&D and HCD with foreign technology is vital for enhancing technical efficiency in manufacturing firms in Africa. This study offers important lessons for managers in manufacturing firms in Africa.

Originality/value

This study is virtually the first to investigate the relationship between innovation inputs and efficiency in Africa. This study demonstrates that investing in foreign technology in isolation from absorptive capacity enhancing innovation inputs diminishes efficiency. HCD and internal R&D are imperative for building absorptive capacity that enhances efficiency outcomes arising from foreign technology.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 April 2016

Christopher Olusegun Adedipe and Bola Olusola Adeleke

This study aims to investigate the structure of human capital development (HCD) in the Nigerian hospitality industry against a backdrop of a turbulent but growing economy.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the structure of human capital development (HCD) in the Nigerian hospitality industry against a backdrop of a turbulent but growing economy.

Design/methodology/approach

Through an in-depth review of the literature and content analysis, the study reviews the major challenges facing the Nigerian hospitality industry.

Findings

The findings show that to develop and improve human capital in the hospitality industry in Nigeria, the input of the private sector, government and other stakeholders is required.

Research limitations/implications

The findings are mainly descriptive. Further research could be enhanced by the inclusion of empirical data.

Originality/value

A comparative review of the HCD strategies and plans of Nigeria’s peers in the African continent presents a different perspective for identifying the gaps in Nigeria’s policies for hospitality industry.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

Keywords

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