Search results

1 – 10 of over 38000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 16 August 2014

Anne-Maria Holma

This study provides a comprehensive framework of adaptation in triadic business relationship settings in the service sector. The framework is based on the industrial…

Abstract

This study provides a comprehensive framework of adaptation in triadic business relationship settings in the service sector. The framework is based on the industrial network approach (see, e.g., Axelsson & Easton, 1992; Håkansson & Snehota, 1995a). The study describes how adaptations initiate, how they progress, and what the outcomes of these adaptations are. Furthermore, the framework takes into account how adaptations spread in triadic relationship settings. The empirical context is corporate travel management, which is a chain of activities where an industrial enterprise, and its preferred travel agency and service supplier partners combine their resources. The scientific philosophy, on which the knowledge creation is based, is realist ontology. Epistemologically, the study relies on constructionist processes and interpretation. Case studies with in-depth interviews are the main source of data.

Details

Deep Knowledge of B2B Relationships within and Across Borders
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-858-7

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 24 June 2019

Sajad Fayezi, Andrew O’Loughlin, Ambika Zutshi, Amrik Sohal and Ajay Das

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of behaviour-based and buffer-based management mechanisms on enterprise agility using the lens of the agency theory.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of behaviour-based and buffer-based management mechanisms on enterprise agility using the lens of the agency theory.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is based on data collected from 185 manufacturing enterprises using a survey instrument. The authors employ structural equation modelling for data analysis.

Findings

The results of this study show that buffer-based mechanisms used for dealing with agency uncertainty of supplier/buyer not only have a positive impact on agility of enterprises, but are also contingent on the behavioural interventions used in the relationship with a supplier/buyer. Behaviour-based mechanisms also positively impact enterprise agility through mitigating the likelihood of supplier/buyer opportunism.

Practical implications

This study demonstrates that buffer- and behaviour-based management mechanisms can be used as complementary approaches against agency uncertainties for enhancing enterprise agility. Therefore, for enterprises to boost their agility, it is vital that their resources and capabilities are fairly distributed across entities responsible for creating buffers through functional flexibility, as well as individuals and teams dealing with stakeholder engagement, in particular, suppliers and buyers.

Originality/value

The authors use the lens of the agency theory to assimilate and model characteristic agency uncertainties and management mechanisms that enhance enterprise agility.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1988

Charles D. Moss

In recent years much attention in the UK has been given to encouraging the establishment and development of viable small firms in order to generate job creation and…

Abstract

In recent years much attention in the UK has been given to encouraging the establishment and development of viable small firms in order to generate job creation and economic growth. Enterprise agencies, set up by local companies, local authorities and others interested in developing the economic life of the community, have taken a major role in advising and guiding individuals who are starting their own small businesses. Enterprise agencies illustrate the growing importance of the concentration of effort within a community based upon local resources, as opposed to more traditional approaches aimed at bringing in jobs from outside the area by attracting inward investment. Reference is made to the type of services rendered by the agencies which small firm managers and directors find most useful when establishing their businesses. Observations are made about how the counselling relationship develops between the agency and the small firm in the critical early months. With over 250 enterprise agencies in existence, the UK is among the most active of EEC countries in taking positive local initiatives which aid the development of small firms.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 88 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1987

Allan A. Gibb and Henry Durowse

The support for local initiatives by large organisations has become substantially institutionalised in the UK through Business in the Community. How much further it will…

Abstract

The support for local initiatives by large organisations has become substantially institutionalised in the UK through Business in the Community. How much further it will go, and how much it will be supported by government, is the subject of debate and conjecture. An overview of how large firms support small and medium enterprise development — the motivations and how they are changing — is provided. The problems in evaluation and a case study of Shell UK Ltd are provided, and future directions, possible shifts and influences are considered.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 1991

Martin Gibson and Maureen Sloan

The work of local enterprise agencies in the UK and the importantrole which an effective training programme can make to their continueddevelopment is assessed. Important…

Abstract

The work of local enterprise agencies in the UK and the important role which an effective training programme can make to their continued development is assessed. Important changes have occurred since their initial formation and future changes can be anticipated. Training is therefore required to ensure that agencies remain capable of providing a professional support service. A study covering all agencies in North‐west England of the training needs identified by agency directors is analysed. It stems from an 18‐month project funded by the Training Agency as a Local Development Project with participation from businesses in the community and the agencies themselves. The difficulties involved in defining training needs are considered, in particular the problem of accurately relating training to agency performance and the problems of delivery in the light of the structure and nature of the agencies.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 February 2008

Pam Seanor and Julia Meaton

The paper aims to present case studies to uncover the reflections of key participants in a social enterprise network in West Yorkshire. It considers how they learn from…

Downloads
3640

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to present case studies to uncover the reflections of key participants in a social enterprise network in West Yorkshire. It considers how they learn from failure and how they make sense of the variety of messages about, and approaches to, social enterprise.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach taken is based upon sense making in organisations. The paper builds upon the concept of ambiguity as well as Sydow's framework of inter‐organisational trust. Participant drawings of these ideas were used to enhance data generated from face to face interviews.

Findings

The paper reviews actors' experiences of failure in projects to explore the relationships of those active in social enterprises and support agencies. From this perspective, uncertainty, ambiguity and unexpected insights into mistrust between organisations were identified as underlying themes.

Research limitations/implications

The concepts of uncertainty, ambiguity, trust and mistrust offer rich ways of perceiving the problems faced by social enterprises. They provide a framework to aid discussions of social enterprise development between academics and practitioners. These concepts may go towards improving understanding in resolving problems and be beneficial in formulating policies and practices that improve service delivery within communities.

Originality/value

Little research looks at lessons learnt from failure and associated issues of ambiguity and trust between social enterprises at a network level. If smaller social enterprises are going to work together in co‐ordinated activity to deliver social projects and to offer economies of scale in contract delivery, trust will be essential. This paper suggests that further research in this area is needed to consider the quality of relationships being nurtured.

Details

Social Enterprise Journal, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-8614

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 16 April 2019

Goodluck Charles

The purpose of this paper is to explore the institutional challenges of coordinating regulatory agencies and the costs associated with compliance requirements in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the institutional challenges of coordinating regulatory agencies and the costs associated with compliance requirements in Tanzania’s tourist industry.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on qualitative research conducted in the northern tourism circuit of Tanzania. Data were generated through semi-structured interviews and focus group discussions with owner-managers of tourism enterprises, heads of regulatory agencies and leaders of business associations (n=60). The findings were analysed through triangulating the data from various sources to establish emerging themes and patterns in accordance with the theoretical underpinnings and research objectives.

Findings

The findings show that tourism enterprises are governed by a multitude of national, sub-national and sectoral institutions mandated to impose several taxes, fees and levies on enterprises. As a result, tourism enterprises are required to obtain duplicate licences and are subjected to uncoordinated inspections. The poor treatment by regulatory agencies, the unclear basis for estimating taxes and levies, inadequate tax education and closure of businesses were also reported as key regulatory challenges. Most challenges emerge from agentification of the public sector and the lack of a legal framework in which to formally facilitate coordination and information sharing amongst government agencies.

Practical implications

The paper proposes streamlining the functions of divergent institutions governing the industry by increasing intergovernmental coordination through delegating some functions, sharing information and enforcing formal inter-ministerial and cross-government consultation structures.

Originality/value

This paper adds value to previous regulatory assessments by empirically analysing the specific sector and showing how the principal–agent relationship for the public sector can be improved through enforcing coordination of the multiple agencies governing the tourist industry.

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Insights, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9792

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 2011

Anne M.J. Smith and Robert A. Paton

Industry, government and funding bodies have long called for the inclusion of entrepreneurship and enterprise within education provision at all levels: engagement with…

Downloads
2393

Abstract

Purpose

Industry, government and funding bodies have long called for the inclusion of entrepreneurship and enterprise within education provision at all levels: engagement with enterprise develops entrepreneurial skills, which in turn will enhance both the employability of the recipient and contribution to the knowledge led economy. This paper seeks to examine an innovative approach to the development, implementation and assessment of enterprise and entrepreneurship.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors were directly engaged with a Scottish Enterprise programme between November 2006 and 2008 inclusive. The observations drawn from this time are part of an ongoing study, which has adopted an action research approach, to assess and deliver transferable skills.

Findings

The programme delivers skills and economic benefits within an international setting. Enterprise agencies, universities and employers have come together to deliver a programme that generates economic benefit while enhancing participant and client capability. It does so by combining and addressing business and technology connectivity, experiential learning and reflective practice.

Practical implications

This paper examines the rationale behind such initiatives and links this to the direct experience of programme development, delivery and assessment; the aim being to “unpack” the programme in such a way as to allow others to access the experience. This should in itself encourage discussion around the academic and pedagogical underpinnings of such enterprise offerings.

Originality/value

The authors hope that this paper helps inform the policy debate (within government, funding and enterprise agencies and representatives of industry and commerce) by addressing the question: how best to engage with practice in a meaningful and enterprise led manner?

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 6 July 2020

Alan Murray and Rosa Palladino

The main objective of this exploratory study is to analyze the range of human capitals necessary for the modern entrepreneur and the nature of the barriers to effectively…

Abstract

Purpose

The main objective of this exploratory study is to analyze the range of human capitals necessary for the modern entrepreneur and the nature of the barriers to effectively support the development of these capitals. Human capital is one of the three dimensions of intellectual capital and this document examines the role of education and training for entrepreneurial success.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on a broad review of the main contributions to research and practice in the field of intellectual capital and entrepreneurship issues, we conducted a qualitative study using semi-structured in-depth interviews on a sample of 10 professionals expert in business support. They represent a cross section of the main corporate agencies in Scotland. In addition, an interview guide was used to ensure that some questions, or “key questions”, were asked to all participants, also allowing for the flexibility to obtain updated information.

Findings

The interviews identified 21 key human capitals needed by today's entrepreneurs. However, the study also identifies the existence of obstacles to providing effective support for the development of human capital in the entrepreneur in terms of attention, process and resources.

Research limitations/implications

Research limitations–The study is based on data collected by a sample of 10 professionals, according to a qualitative approach that focuses on a specific social field and therefore the results cannot be immediately generalized to other fields.

Practical implications

Practical implications–The study identifies the key human capital needed to run a successful company, directing the professional to direct support interventions more effectively in order to increase productivity and improve success rates for its customers.

Social implications

The value the long-term benefits of even a marginal increase in the efficiency of enterprise support to business through targeted entrepreneurial learning cannot be overstated.

Originality/value

There is a lack of empirical data linking the development of human capital and entrepreneurship. This work has resonance for providers of enterprise support seeking to remain relevant to the entrepreneurial development needs of the entrepreneur.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 2 March 2010

John Mawson

The purpose of this paper is to examine the way in which the UK Labour Government “framed” the policy and practice debate on social enterprise, the way in which…

Downloads
1676

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the way in which the UK Labour Government “framed” the policy and practice debate on social enterprise, the way in which “strategic” networks were (or were not) facilitated and the extent to which scale and geography shaped policy choices after 1997.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper examines three phases of development through a series of examples/case studies all of which are based in the West Midlands in the UK. The paper draws upon the author's practice and experience as both a practitioner and researcher during this period. Interviews with other key individuals are undertaken to inform the author's reflections and analysis.

Findings

The paper suggests that there is a risk that experience, knowledge and understanding are at risk as there seems to be poorly developed processes and systems to “capture” informed understanding and that the importance of regional networks to promote practice and to protect innovation are often poorly developed and supported.

Research limitations/implications

The paper is timely given the renewed focus by political parties in the UK on the role of the third sector in providing the “solution” for a number of public sector initiatives.

Practical implications

The paper cuts across both the literature/debate on public policy as well as that on the role of networks and decision making within informal (as well as formal) organisations.

Originality/value

The paper is timely and will add to an awareness of policy choices and the importance of sustaining a “memory” of past (and current) programmes.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 30 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 38000