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Article
Publication date: 6 September 2011

Catherine Gorrell

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680

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Strategy & Leadership, vol. 39 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

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Article
Publication date: 6 September 2011

Brian Leavy

The purpose of this paper is to present an interview by Strategy & Leadership with Professor Vijay Govindarajan, one of the world's foremost experts on innovation

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1420

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present an interview by Strategy & Leadership with Professor Vijay Govindarajan, one of the world's foremost experts on innovation execution and the co‐author of The Other Side of Innovation (2010), which discusses innovating for emerging markets, building the right innovation team, innovation planning as learning, and his newest concept, emotional infrastructure.

Design/methodology/approach

Govindarajan explains how companies use the “forget‐borrow‐learn” framework to drive innovation execution. They “forget” the core business success formula, “borrow” key assets from core business, and “learn” to resolve unknowns.

Findings

The paper finds that to manage innovation a special plan should be created to guide disciplined experiments for quicker learning. Quicker learning leads to better decisions, and better decisions lead to better results. A special innovation initiative team should also be created: a partnership between a dedicated team (using a mix of insiders and outsiders, with new job descriptions) and shared staff, who support the project while sustaining its performance engine responsibilities.

Practical implications

Do not “isolate” new businesses or “spin them off.” This forfeits the advantage of using existing assets, such as brands, manufacturing facilities, relationships with customers, areas of technical expertise and much more.

Originality/value

Today reverse innovation, taking unique business models from poor countries to rich ones, is a winning formula. But new organizational systems are required so that full business capabilities for reverse innovation in emerging markets – including product development, manufacturing, and marketing – are possible.

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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Mark A. Bonn, Meehee Cho, Jun Jae Lee and Joo Hyang Kim

The purpose of this study was conducted to investigate the moderating effects wine destination attributes have upon the negative impacts of travel constraints on…

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1256

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was conducted to investigate the moderating effects wine destination attributes have upon the negative impacts of travel constraints on consumer’s intent to revisit wine regions and also assist wine destinations with the development of marketing strategies designed to offset travel constraints which then could lead to increased intentions to revisit wine regions.

Design/methodology/approach

A sampling frame was designed to collect data from consumers visiting 15 wineries using a list of wineries provided by an industry distributor. Self-administered on-site surveys were distributed to visitors during random days and times at each site. To effectively analyze this study’s data set, hierarchical linear models were developed to test our main research question suggesting the significant cross-level effects wine destination attributes (at the regional level) have upon travel constraints in combination with revisit intention (at the individual level).

Findings

The negative impact of the “structural” constraints’ dimension on revisit intention is weaker when people are emotionally attracted to a specific wine destination and/or when wine-specific attractions appeal strongly to visitors. Additionally, the negative impact of the “intrapersonal” constraints on “revisit intention” is weaker when positive perceptions about “wine-specific attractions” and/or “tourism infrastructure” attributes are strong.

Practical implications

Results provide strategic directions for wine destination marketing organizations to more accurately improve their destination’s reputation by determining and establishing the most attractive wine-specific attributes as perceived by visitors. Findings also assist these destinations to develop and provide appropriate tourism infrastructure.

Originality/value

This study investigated the effects of wine destination attributes and their attractiveness upon an individual’s travel constraints and revisit intention using a multilevel approach incorporating a regional-based perspective.

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International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 28 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2003

Derek H.T. Walker and Derick S. Johannes

Organisations often collaboratively seek ways such as partnerships, alliances and joint venture (JVs), to bridge gaps in their knowledge and capacity to provide goods or…

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1113

Abstract

Organisations often collaboratively seek ways such as partnerships, alliances and joint venture (JVs), to bridge gaps in their knowledge and capacity to provide goods or services. Infrastructure projects in Hong Kong often require clusters of resources, knowledge, skills and capabilities that are difficult to obtain in a single provider – it is often problematic for any single organisation to successfully complete these projects using only in‐house resources and knowledge. Thus, providers frequently form JVs and similar forms of relationships to undertake large‐scale infrastructure projects. While one motivation has been to spread financial and other risks, a strong motivation is to better capture learning, so that this hidden and intangible asset may be later applied to improve JV partners’ competitive advantage. Presents results from a pilot study that investigates the nature of the JV relationship, focusing upon the dimension of organisational learning intentions of JV representatives interviewed.

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The Learning Organization, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

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Book part
Publication date: 3 October 2019

Zhao Alexandre Huang and Rui Wang

Using the theoretical frameworks of public diplomacy and public relations, we mapped how the Chinese government has used panda imagery to build its national brand on…

Abstract

Using the theoretical frameworks of public diplomacy and public relations, we mapped how the Chinese government has used panda imagery to build its national brand on Twitter and how this ‘panda diplomacy’ has facilitated its para-diplomatic actions. Our findings uncover new attempts by the Chinese government to engage in digital diplomacy. Mobilizing panda imagery on Twitter enhanced friendly relations with foreign political leaders and people and established a friendly and peaceful image of China on Twitter.

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Big Ideas in Public Relations Research and Practice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-508-0

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Article
Publication date: 25 September 2019

Thomas A. Hanson, Michael R. Bryant and Katie J. Lyman

The purpose of this paper is to explore relationships among three primary variables: sports spectatorship of intercollegiate football, university brand equity and student…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore relationships among three primary variables: sports spectatorship of intercollegiate football, university brand equity and student satisfaction. The primary purpose is to understand the extent to which athletic programs influence campus culture, sense of community and the satisfaction of undergraduate students. A secondary purpose is to probe the factor structure, reliability and validity of a recently developed sports spectatorship scale.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors collected data through an online survey of 419 undergraduate students enrolled at three separate Midwestern universities, using previously developed and validated survey scales.

Findings

Relationships between brand equity and student satisfaction suggest that athletic programs provide a benefit to universities by improving students’ psychological sense of community and emotional connection to the institution. Furthermore, correlations between sports spectatorship and brand equity measures suggest an internal advertising effect.

Originality/value

The results contribute to the understanding of the role of intercollegiate athletic programs, in this case from the perspective of enrolled undergraduate students. Additionally, the findings recommend ways that universities might maximize some of the benefits by emphasizing the emotional connection of the student body to the teams. The paper also contributes to the validation of the sports spectatorship scale as a tool for further research.

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International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

A. Elçin Gören Summak

Educational futurology has a unique place in the overall futuristic efforts that schools must be places where future is foreseen, cast and shaped. To achieve this end, we…

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431

Abstract

Educational futurology has a unique place in the overall futuristic efforts that schools must be places where future is foreseen, cast and shaped. To achieve this end, we educators should have a clear idea of what future looks like in the eye of young school children and the emotional atmosphere they experience at school. Type of school curricula, gender difference, socio‐economic status of the family, mother’s and father’s educational background and occupation seem to have great impact on the way youngsters perceive mid‐range futures, on a triple basis. Samples of the study were 839 high school students selected randomly among the 9th, 10th and 11th grades from 12 high schools of six different programmes, enrolled in the high schools in 1998‐1999 in Gaziantep province, Turkey. The preliminary form of the data collection tool was administered to 1,010 subjects to assure validity and reliability. Throughout the study, the sample’s future perceptions were assessed on five sub‐scales, namely personal future, national future, global future, peaceful future and future wars. Findings revealed that type of school curricula and gender differences seemed to have an impact on the students’ future perceptions by the year 2020. Another noteworthy finding was that subjects also failed to see the intersections between their personal future and national and global futures, which would have cross impact on their lives, in one way or another. In this particular paper the first three futures will be submitted and discussed, with respect to curricular differences.

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Foresight, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6689

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Article
Publication date: 8 August 2016

Vartika Dutta and Sangeeta Sahney

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of teacher job satisfaction and school climate in mediating the relative effects of principals’ instructional and…

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5259

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of teacher job satisfaction and school climate in mediating the relative effects of principals’ instructional and transformational leadership practices on student outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

Guided by strong evidence from theories on school leadership and work psychology, the authors hypothesized relations among dimensions of principals’ instructional and transformational leadership behaviors, teachers’ perception of the school climate (social and affective, and physical environment), their job satisfaction and student achievement. The benefits of the principal’s leadership behaviors for student achievement are primarily hypothesized as indirect, with either a weak or statistically non-significant direct positive effect on student outcomes. Path modeling was applied to validate a mediated-effects model using cross-sectional survey data (306 principals, 1,539 teachers) obtained from 306 secondary schools in the two Indian metropolitan cities of New Delhi and Kolkata.

Findings

Principal leadership behaviors were not associated directly with either teacher job satisfaction or school-aggregated student achievement. Rather, the transformational leader behavior showed an indirect effect, through the social and affective component of the school climate, on teacher job satisfaction. The physical climate, however, appeared to play a dominating role in mediating the instructional leadership effects on teacher job satisfaction. Comparing the relative indirect effect sizes of the instructional and transformational leadership behaviors on student achievement, principals appear to favor the former approach.

Originality/value

This study provides further empirical evidence that instructional leadership better captures the impact of school leadership on student outcomes, when compared to its transformational counterpart. By identifying the relative effects of different leadership practices, school leaders and educational practitioners can focus more on altering the distribution and frequency of those practices that work best for ameliorating student achievement levels.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 30 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Book part
Publication date: 11 December 2006

Alfons Cortés and Salvatore Rizzello

All through last century, the Austrian School of Economics introduced a series of original and interesting ideas into social sciences, which are still fruitful for…

Abstract

All through last century, the Austrian School of Economics introduced a series of original and interesting ideas into social sciences, which are still fruitful for contemporary research. We are not referring only to the ideas that are particularly relevant in economics, such as marginal utility, competition, market, entrepreneur, time irreversibility, information, risk, uncertainty, economic cycle, money, theory of capital, public choice, to mention only the most relevant ones. What we have in mind is ideas relevant for all social sciences: methodological subjectivism, apriorism, human knowledge, human action, decision making, praxeology, human freedom, evolution, nature and role of institutions. The ideas expressed by the authors belonging to this school are often so heterogeneous, that they are rather a composite collection of ideas than a single consistent corpus. Nevertheless, a few common aspects characterize the school as a whole.

Details

Cognition and Economics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-465-2

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Article
Publication date: 2 February 2021

Alex Cockain

This article documents accounts of the tactics parents and siblings of autistic persons in Hong Kong deploy to manage social encounters. This article aims to consider the…

Abstract

Purpose

This article documents accounts of the tactics parents and siblings of autistic persons in Hong Kong deploy to manage social encounters. This article aims to consider the impact of such tactics and their enmeshment with factors that combine to limit satisfactory outcomes and outlines a project intent upon contriving dialogue between persons.

Design/methodology/approach

This qualitative project elicited stories and accounts (or narratives) produced by persons involved in encounters involving autistic persons. This project also intervened in these encounters.

Findings

Persons involved in social encounters are de-fused, in the sense of being disconnected. The emotions persons experience through these encounters (e.g. and especially anxiety) remain hidden. Dialogue has the capacity to re-fuse, not only reconnecting but also rejecting unsatisfactory arrangements.

Originality/value

The dialogue produced in the article may extend beyond the specific circumstances and persons considered, potentially reducing the barriers and distances between autistic persons and others.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Keywords

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