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Mitsuru Kodama

As a company that has continuously achieved business innovation, Apple in the United States has successfully applied strategic knowledge creation to produce a series of…

Abstract

As a company that has continuously achieved business innovation, Apple in the United States has successfully applied strategic knowledge creation to produce a series of products that integrate various digital devices as well as diverse contents and applications, such as the iPod, iPhone, and iPad, based on a corporate vision of a digital hub concept. At the same time, the redefining of corporate boundaries that expanded Apple’s business in a horizontal direction from the Macintosh PC business to the delivery of music, smartphones, and tablets is also an indication of the evolution of a corporate vision involving Apple’s strategic transformation. This chapter presents the strategic and creative processes that enabled practitioners, including the late Steve Jobs, to demonstrate “strategic innovation capability” by “holistic leadership” at every level of management at Apple and successfully achieve a business ecosystem strategy through “creative collaboration” across diverse boundaries within and outside the company.

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Book part

Abderisak Adam and Göran Lindahl

The purpose of this paper is to examine the Company Dynamic Response Map (CDRM) risk management model that uses the dynamic capabilities concept. The study examines risks…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the Company Dynamic Response Map (CDRM) risk management model that uses the dynamic capabilities concept. The study examines risks associated with strategic decision-making in construction projects and evaluates proposed methods that connect the dynamic capabilities of project-based organisations with risk management.

Design/Methodology/Approach

This preliminary study examines risks associated with strategic decision-making in construction projects and evaluates a proposed model that connects the dynamic capabilities of project-based organisations with risk management. Specifically, the CDRM model is evaluated, a risk management model developed by Arena et al. (2013) to better respond to risks and opportunities based on the concept of dynamic capabilities.

Findings

We argue that although the CDRM presents a promising development in that it uses dynamic capabilities prospectively in a risk management model to produce tangible results, there are, nonetheless, impediments to the CDRM being used by construction clients. The primary impediment relates to the issue of categorisation, the difficulty in assigning a specific identified risk to a particular category of dynamic capabilities.

Research Limitations/Implications

A conceptual argument is made and not an empirical one.

Practical Implications

The CDRM model was developed to be used in practice and this paper evaluates that model.

Originality/Value

Contributes to both the dynamic capabilities literature as well as risk management literature. The paper ends with a discussion on the possible merits of the CDRM, and an evaluation on potential impediments to its use by construction clients.

Details

10th Nordic Conference on Construction Economics and Organization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-051-1

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Article

Kevin C. Desouza and Yukika Awazu

To draw management and scholarly attention to two missing capabilities in a knowledge management program: segmentation capability and destruction capability.

Abstract

Purpose

To draw management and scholarly attention to two missing capabilities in a knowledge management program: segmentation capability and destruction capability.

Design/methodology/approach

An opinion paper based on consulting and research experiences of the authors.

Findings

Organizations that consider the two missing capabilities have witnessed significantly improved knowledge management programs compared with when the capabilities were missing from their agenda. In addition to the two missing capabilities, the third capability – protection capability – may need due attention.

Research limitations/implications

The two missing capabilities can be further investigated as important constructs. The two capabilities complement and augment their peer capabilities (creation, transfer, storing, retrieving and applying). The intricacies of the missing capabilities and the known capabilities need to be further studied.

Practical implications

If an organization neglects the two capabilities, the benefits of their knowledge management program will be limited. Organizations can cultivate the two missing capabilities effectively and efficiently by following the suggestions of the paper.

Originality/value

This is the first paper that discusses the two missing knowledge management capabilities exclusively and connects their role and importance to known capabilities.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

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Article

Dalila Brown, Pantea Foroudi and Khalid Hafeez

This paper aims to explore the relationship between corporate cultural/intangible assets and marketing capabilities by examining managers’ and entrepreneurs’ perceptions…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the relationship between corporate cultural/intangible assets and marketing capabilities by examining managers’ and entrepreneurs’ perceptions in a retail setting.

Design/methodology/approach

Nineteen face-to-face interviews were conducted with UK small and medium sized enterprise (SMEs) managers and entrepreneurs to identify six sub-capabilities that form marketing capability. The authors further validated the relationship between marketing sub-capabilities and its antecedent tangible and intangible assets. The qualitative approach used provided a deeper insight into the motivations, perceptions and associations of the stakeholders behind these intangible concepts, and their relationships with their customers.

Findings

The research identified that there is a strong relationship between tangible and intangible assets, their components and the following capabilities: corporate/brand identity management, market sensing, customer relationship, social media/communication, design/innovation management and performance management. In addition, companies need to understand clearly what tangible and intangible assets comprise these capabilities. Where performance management is one of the key internal capabilities, companies must highlight the importance of strong cultural assets that substantially contribute to a company’s performance.

Originality/value

Previous work on dynamic capability analysis is too generic, predominantly relating to the manufacturing sector, and/or focussing on using a single case study example. This study extends the concept of marketing capability in a retail setting by identifying six sub-capabilities and describing the relationship of each with tangible and intangible assets. Through extensive qualitative analysis, the authors provide evidence that by fully exploiting their embedded culture and other intangible components, companies can more favourably engage with their customers to attain a sustainable competitive advantage.

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Article

Lucia Garcés-Galdeano, Carmen García-Olaverri and Emilio Huerta

The purpose of this paper is to explore the possible causes of the heterogeneous productivity observed in Spanish firms, finding evidence of a link between managerial…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the possible causes of the heterogeneous productivity observed in Spanish firms, finding evidence of a link between managerial capability and higher productivity in the context of family firms. Also, innovative human resource policies are much more frequently found in companies where there is a high level of management capability.

Design/methodology/approach

Productivity differences in Spanish family firms are, for the first time, analysed from a managerial view, and using multiple correspondence analysis (MCA).

Findings

This paper proposes a way to measure managerial capability. Innovative human resource policies are much more frequently found in companies with high levels of management capability. The authors show that sustained competitive advantage is not just a function of single or isolated components, but rather a combination of human capital elements. Besides, a clear association between high managerial capability and performance in family firms is established. Thus, better management skills enable Spanish family firms to design the necessary strategies and internal structures to facilitate their adjustment to the business environment, and, thereby, achieve operational performance gains.

Originality/value

This paper proposes a way to measure managerial capability and its association with productivity in Spanish family firms using MCA. The authors also show a clear positive association between high managerial capability and performance in family firms. Thus, better management skills enable Spanish family firms to achieve operational performance gains.

Objetivo

Este artículo explora las posibles causas de la heterogeneidad observada en la productividad de las empresas españolas, buscando un vínculo entre la capacidad de gestión y la productividad en el contexto de las empresas familiares. Además, se muestra cómo las políticas innovadoras de recursos humanos se encuentran con mayor frecuencia en las empresas donde hay una mejor capacidad de gestión.

Diseño/metodología/enfoque

Por primera vez, se analizan las diferencias de productividad en las empresas familiares españolas desde el punto de vista de la gestión empresarial, utilizando análisis de correspondencias múltiples (MCA).

Conclusiones

Este trabajo mide la capacidad de gestión de una forma innovadora. Las políticas de recursos humanos se encuentran con mayor frecuencia en las empresas donde hay una alta capacidad de gestión. Se muestra que la ventaja competitiva de la empresa no es la suma individual de cada elemento, sino más bien una combinación de elementos de capital humano. Además, se establece una clara asociación entre la capacidad de gestión y los resultados en las empresas familiares. Por lo tanto, la mejora de las habilidades de la gestión empresarial permite a las empresas familiares españolas diseñar las estrategias y estructuras internas necesarias para facilitar su adaptación al entorno empresarial, y de ese modo, lograr mejoras en los resultados.

Originalidad/valor

Este artículo muestra la asociación entre la capacidad de gestión y la productividad de una forma original, a través de análisis de correspondencias múltiples (MCA). Establece una clara asociación positiva entre la capacidad de gestión y los resultados en las empresas familiares. Por lo tanto, la mejora de las habilidades de gestión permite a las empresas familiares españolas lograr mejoras en los resultados.

Details

Academia Revista Latinoamericana de Administración, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1012-8255

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Article

Antonia M. Gil‐Padilla and Tomás F. Espino‐Rodríguez

An improvement in the management of information system (IS) based resources and capabilities of hotels must affect competitive advantage. Based on that premise, this work…

Abstract

Purpose

An improvement in the management of information system (IS) based resources and capabilities of hotels must affect competitive advantage. Based on that premise, this work has two aims. The first is to determine how the strategic value of the IS area affects the organizational performance of three‐, four‐ and five‐star hotels. The second is to check how it influences the resources and capabilities used in the IS area of hotel companies in a determined tourist destination, and their relationship with organizational performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was conducted on a representative sample of hotels in Gran Canaria, Spain. It takes the framework of Bharadwaj as a reference to help companies tackle the management of the IS area and to develop a superior capability in that activity.

Findings

The results of the study indicate that the more valuable, non‐substitutable and inimitable the IS area is, the better the non‐financial performance is. The results also show that the resources and capabilities that most affect hotel performance are the internal and external technical resources and the capabilities of the IS area to influence and strengthen relations with users and with different areas of the hotel. The work also finds that organizational capabilities have a particular influence on non‐financial performance, especially that related to organizational quality.

Research limitations/implications

This study helps to establish a new framework of analysis in the literature on IS management by introducing a perspective of analysis for the study of the strategic deployment of IS attributes that is based on the resource based view of the firm.

Practical implications

This paper constitutes a suitable framework to begin the diagnosis of the situation of each hotel regarding its available IS resources and capabilities and to identify and select the IS resources and capabilities that make greater contributions to hotel profitability and quality.

Originality/value

This work serves to help identify which IS resources and capabilities are most important in the development of distinctive hotel competences.

Details

Tourism Review, vol. 63 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1660-5373

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Article

Rolf Brühl, Nils Horch and Mathias Osann

The purpose of this paper is to gain a deeper understanding of how companies integrate their innovation and operations processes. Referring to the dynamic capability

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to gain a deeper understanding of how companies integrate their innovation and operations processes. Referring to the dynamic capability approach, the authors derive an “integration capability” construct from a set of qualitative data. The authors expand this concept stressing the specific role of management control as a crucial part of an integration capability to align the different processes.

Design/methodology/approach

Case studies in eight German industrial and service companies were conducted and qualitative material was analysed guided by a grounded theory approach.

Findings

The paper aims at exploring a specific dynamic capability in order to integrate innovation and operations processes. Based on a qualitative study of eight cases, three distinctive categories are derived describing the construct of an integration capability: organization, communication, and management control. Furthermore, influencing factors which lead to different levels of intensity of integration are described.

Research limitations/implications

Comparing the findings with existing research on integration capabilities fosters and expands knowledge on the construct “integration capability”. Effective coordination and communication based on efficient and structured processes seem to be crucial elements of integration capabilities. The paper expands the literature on the role of technology in integration capability which plays a major role in organizing effective coordination and communication.

Practical implications

Management control culture contributes to the present design of control systems of every company studied. Starting point for the design of control systems in research departments is the standard of management control in operations management. Therefore, it is assumed that higher control intensities in operational units will lead to higher control intensities in R&D departments.

Originality/value

In turbulent market environments, companies need to set up organizational processes which effectively coordinate and deploy internal and external resources. These dynamic capabilities are crucial to gain a sustainable competitive advantage. Until now, research on integration capabilities has lacked an analysis of the role of management control; with the empirical findings, this paper shows how management control improves integration capability.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

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Article

Denise Jarratt

The purpose of this paper is to test a theoretically derived representation of a relationship management capability. The relationship management capability architecture…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test a theoretically derived representation of a relationship management capability. The relationship management capability architecture developed from the literature integrated theory on dynamic capabilities, the resource‐advantage theory of competition, and prior capability research in innovation and information technology management.

Design/methodology/approach

The second‐order constructs of relationship infrastructure, relationship learning and relationship behaviour argues to represent a relationship management capability (RMC) was assigned measures adapted from the literature, and pilot tested with industry consultants. The final questionnaire was sent to senior executives responsible for customer relationship management in manufacturing and business service firms in the UK. The structural model representing the RMC was shown to be robust with a comparative fit index of 0.91.

Findings

Although the low response rate and the subjectiveness of respondents encourage caution in interpreting the research findings, the results suggest that relationship management systems, implemented through collaborative and flexible behaviours, and renewed through adaptive and generative knowledge derived from experience and challenging current relationship management assumptions, are key dimensions of a RMC.

Originality/value

This framework advances and tests a new theoretical perspective of a relationship management capability that incorporates a capacity for renewal. In addition, it provides managers with a tool to evaluate their organisation's relationship management capability at key stakeholder interfaces on attributes that define relationship infrastructure, relationship learning and relationship behaviour, as this capability is renewed over time.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 42 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article

Marika Arena, Giovanni Azzone, Enrico Cagno, Amerigo Silvestri and Paolo Trucco

This paper aims to propose a model, to operationalize the idea of enterprise risk management (ERM), relying on the concept of capabilities. The proposed model, labelled…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to propose a model, to operationalize the idea of enterprise risk management (ERM), relying on the concept of capabilities. The proposed model, labelled “Spring model”, is specifically tailored to the characteristics of project-based organisations, where risk is to be managed transversally to different organizational levels (enterprise, project portfolio, functions, projects).

Design/methodology/approach

A case study methodology is used to exemplify the functioning of the proposed model and display the suitability of the concept of capabilities, as means whereby companies can manage their risk. Data were collected from different sources over a time frame of three years: semi-structured interviews, official documents and presentations, archives, direct observation and internal document usually not available to the public.

Findings

The “Spring model” explains how risk can impact different organizational levels (enterprise, project portfolio, functions, projects), and how risk can be effectively managed, at different organizational levels, through the organization's capabilities.

Practical implications

The paper gives concrete guidance on the operational elements that project-based organisations should consider for managing risks in a comprehensive and integrated way and discusses potential analysis/insights that could be derived embracing the capability perspective. The empirical testing, performed in a leading oil and gas company, provides an example of its functioning.

Originality/value

The paper represents an attempt to apply ERM concepts and tools to operations, making a connection between research in corporate governance and finance, where the ERM concept originated, and research in project management, where attention of researchers tended to concentrate on specific types of risk management practices.

Details

International Journal of Energy Sector Management, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6220

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Article

J. Kiarash Sadeghi, Elisabeth Struckell, Divesh Ojha and David Nowicki

Service organization supply chains provide a context that amplifies the complexity of interorganizational interdependencies and the need to build unique capabilities and…

Abstract

Purpose

Service organization supply chains provide a context that amplifies the complexity of interorganizational interdependencies and the need to build unique capabilities and innovative solutions, especially when confronted with man-made or natural disasters. Using the lens of complex adaptive systems (CAS), this study aims to investigate the role of absorptive capacity (AC), change management capability and information quality in improving a firm’s ability to cope with disasters – disaster immunity (DI). The study uniquely parses absorptive capacity into a three-variable, second-order construct (absorptive human resource management, absorptive complementary knowledge and absorptive infrastructure).

Design/methodology/approach

Using data collected from 264 US service firms in a supply chain context, this paper evaluates the research model using the structural equation modeling approach.

Findings

The second-order, three-dimensional framework for AC has far superior psychometric properties as compared to the previous unidimensional conceptualizations. Results show that AC influences a firm’s DI through change management capability and information quality – two DI enhancing resources.

Originality/value

The paper builds on previous conceptual discussions of absorptive capacity as a multidimensional construct by operationalizing AC as a latent variable with three dimensions (above). Moreover, this paper shows that AC, change management capability, information quality and DI are interrelated parts of a CAS.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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