Search results

1 – 10 of over 9000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 27 August 2019

Hui Quan, Yi Chai, Rennian Li, Guo-Yi Peng and Ying Guo

Having read previous literature about vortex pump, we noticed that mechanisms of circulating flow and its relationship with energy transition remain unclear yet. However…

Abstract

Purpose

Having read previous literature about vortex pump, we noticed that mechanisms of circulating flow and its relationship with energy transition remain unclear yet. However, this mechanism, which should be clarified, significantly influences the pump’s efficiency. To comply with the aim of investigating it, the 150WX-200-20 type pump is selected as study object in our present work.

Design/methodology/approach

Numerical simulation is conducted to formulate interactions between flow rate and geometric parameters of circulating flow with certain types of blade while experiments on inner flow are served as a witness to provide experimental confirmation of numerical results. Based on these, we coupled some parameters with the pump’s external performance to study their internal connections.

Findings

It is concluded that separatrix between circulating flow and other turbulent forms is not that clear under low flow rate. With flow increases, hydraulic losses coming of it will be dominant within the front chamber. Besides, we analogized circulating flow to vortices so as to make a quantitative analysis on its progressive evolution with changing flow, and vortices speaking for circulating flow can be divided into two groups. One is called main circulating flow vortex (hereinafter referred to as MCFV), which occurs all the time while subsidiary circulating flow vortices (hereinafter referred to as SCFV) appear in certain conditions. This context discusses the primary phase of our work with intent to follow up further with circulating flow characterized by vortices (hereinafter referred to as CFV). We confirmed that MCFV Vortex 1 (Vor1) directly influences the efficiency while SCFVs only play helping. As the flow goes to the given working condition, fluids in this pump tend to be steady with the size of CFVs getting larger and their shape being regular. Meanwhile, for MCFV Vor2 and Vor4, their geometric parameters are the key factors for efficiency. When CFVs become steady, they absorb other vortices nearby, as they have higher viscosity with the efficiency reaching its maximum.

Originality/value

The research results explore a new way to measure the circulating flow and help work out the causation of this flow pattern, which may be used to improve the vortex pump’s efficiency.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 27 July 2017

Anandajit Goswami, Kaushik Ranjan Bandyopadhyay and Atul Kumar

The purpose of this paper is to explore the nature of rural energy transition in cooking options in India. Although India is aiming to achieve a double-digit economic…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the nature of rural energy transition in cooking options in India. Although India is aiming to achieve a double-digit economic growth, a large share of rural households still rely on firewood for cooking which not only has serious repercussions of increasing indoor pollution but also has a concomitant adverse effect on women and child morbidity and mortality. However, transition to clean energy options like improved cookstoves for these households may not be necessarily linear. It is often driven or resisted by latent factors such as caste, trust, social capital, information flow, social positioning of clusters that are deeply embedded in the social and cultural norms and values specific to local rural contexts. This has been shown in the present case study that pertains to eight villages in the remote and deprived Purnea district of Bihar and the need for internalizing them in the macro energy policymaking has been established in the paper.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper applies a macro foundation research that is complemented by micro foundation tools of fuzzy cognitive mapping-based mental model framework to achieve the purpose of the study. Focused-group discussions and interviews are also conducted to establish the narrative of the paper.

Findings

Caste, socio-political position, asset structure, remoteness, culture and technology access affect rural households’ decision making capability that is related to shifting from using the traditionalmeans of firewood and biomass based traditional cookstoves for cooking to adopting improved clean cooking stoves which will enable the transition toward the use of clean rural energy in the eight villages in Bihar chosen for this study.

Research limitations/implications

The findings of the paper have larger implications for the broader macro energy policymaking in the country by taking into account the non-linear, latent factors of village contexts.

Practical implications

The research will help energy policymakers in decision-making and will guide the implementation process of national- and state-level policies on rural energy transition in India.

Social implications

The findings of the paper will help the smoother implementation of national- and state-level rural energy transition policies for cooking, creating developmental dividends for rural Indian households.

Originality/value

The research is new with regard to the application of non-deterministic fuzzy cognitive mapping-based mental model approach to contribute to the country’s national- and state-level rural energy transition policies.

Details

International Journal of Energy Sector Management, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6220

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 5 September 2016

Emma Sofia Hakala and Ilija Batas Bjelic

This paper aims to look at the dilemma of promoting sustainable energy transition in post-socialist countries while containing social and economic implications, focusing…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to look at the dilemma of promoting sustainable energy transition in post-socialist countries while containing social and economic implications, focusing on the case of Serbia. The aim is to analyse Serbian energy status taking into account historical factors, to analyse barriers that are hindering transition and to identify leapfrogging potential for the sustainable energy development of the country.

Design/methodology/approach

Energy transition and leapfrogging potential have been qualified and quantified by indicators, the own calculations and policy analysis to identify barriers to sustainable energy.

Findings

The country has vast potential for leapfrogging in energy transition, yet continues the gradualist approach based on several policy barriers to the process. The analysis shows six barriers related to low energy price, high energy intensity, prioritization of energy security, inadequacy of utilization of renewable sources, lack of policy coherence and dependency on external funding. However, these barriers could be overcome with an energy policy emphasizing leapfrogging potential. As is pointed out in the conclusion, this should be based on the difference between EU-28 average indicators, discrepancy between use and availability of renewable energy, potential for regional cooperation in the energy sector and under-used skills and participation.

Originality/value

The paper discusses energy transition in its historical context, arguing that it has to be considered as comprehensively with societal implications and effects, thus creating useful knowledge for other post-socialist countries in current and future transitions.

Details

International Journal of Energy Sector Management, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6220

Keywords

Abstract

Details

SDG7 – Ensure Access to Affordable, Reliable, Sustainable and Modern Energy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-802-5

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 7 September 2012

Joy P. Vazhayil and R. Balasubramanian

Optimization of energy planning for growth and sustainable development has become very important in the context of climate change mitigation imperatives in developing…

Abstract

Purpose

Optimization of energy planning for growth and sustainable development has become very important in the context of climate change mitigation imperatives in developing countries. Existing models do not capture developing country realities adequately. The purpose of this paper is to conceptualizes a framework for energy strategy optimization of the Indian energy sector, which can be applied in all emerging economies.

Design/methodology/approach

Hierarchical multi‐objective policy optimization methodology adopts a policy‐centric approach and groups the energy strategies into multi‐level portfolios based on convergence of objectives appropriate to each level. This arrangement facilitates application of the optimality principle of dynamic programming. Synchronised optimization of strategies with respect to the common objectives at each level results in optimal policy portfolios.

Findings

The reductionist policy‐centric approach to complex energy economy modelling, facilitated by the dynamic programming methodology, is most suitable for policy optimization in the context of a developing country. Barriers to project implementation and cost risks are critical features of developing countries which are captured in the framework in the form of a comprehensive risk barrier index. Genetic algorithms are suitable for optimization of the first level objectives, while the efficiency approach, using restricted weight stochastic data envelopment analysis, is appropriate for higher levels of the objective hierarchy.

Research limitations/implications

The methodology has been designed for application to the energy sector planning for India's 12th Five Year Plan for which the objectives of faster growth, better inclusion, energy security and sustainability have been identified. The conceptual framework combines, within the policy domain, the bottom‐up and top‐down processes to form a hybrid modelling approach yielding optimal outcomes, transparent and convincing to the policy makers. The research findings have substantial implications for transition management to a sustainable energy framework.

Originality/value

The methodology is general in nature and can be employed in all sectors of the economy. It is especially suited to policy design in developing countries with the ground realities factored into the model as project barriers. It offers modularity and flexibility in implementation and can accommodate all the key strategies from diverse sectors along with multiple objectives in the policy optimization process. It enables adoption of an evidence‐based and transparent approach to policy making. The research findings have substantial value for transition management to a sustainable energy framework in developing countries.

Details

International Journal of Energy Sector Management, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6220

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Expert briefing
Publication date: 18 April 2018

Carbon reduction strategies.

Abstract

Details

SDG7 – Ensure Access to Affordable, Reliable, Sustainable and Modern Energy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-802-5

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 29 November 2018

Roger Andre Søraa, Håkon Fyhn and Jøran Solli

This paper aims to investigate the role of a particular energy calculator in enhancing the energy efficiency of existing homes by asking how this calculator was developed…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the role of a particular energy calculator in enhancing the energy efficiency of existing homes by asking how this calculator was developed and how it is domesticated by craftspeople working as energy consultants.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on qualitative interviews with users and producers of the energy calculator (n = 22), as well as participation in energy consultation training.

Findings

The paper finds that, in the energy calculator, there is a striking lack of connection between the domestication and script because of lack of energy consultants’ involvement in the design and implementation process.

Practical implications

The enrolment of energy consultants as energy calculator users earlier in and throughout the design process could be valuable in making the transition to an energy-efficient and environmentally friendly building sector.

Social implications

The paper argues for recognition of the role of energy consultants, especially craftspeople, as participants in the design process for tools of governance. This is a call to acknowledge the value of particular skills and experiences possessed by craftspeople doing home consultation.

Originality/value

By understanding the intricate developer–user synchronicity in tools developed for upgrading the building sector, energy mitigation can be made more effective.

Details

Facilities, vol. 37 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 18 January 2013

Árni Halldórsson and Martin Svanberg

The aim of this research paper is to explain how principles of supply chain management (SCM) provide important conditions for the production, accessibility and use of

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this research paper is to explain how principles of supply chain management (SCM) provide important conditions for the production, accessibility and use of energy, from the point of origin to the point of consumption.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper identifies three distinct trajectories in which the interplay between energy and SCM can release potential for research and practice.

Findings

Energy resources are vital to power industrial processes in manufacturing and logistics, while their use is also a major contributor to carbon emissions. The integrative nature of SCM provides conditions for improvement in use and accessibility of energy, and can facilitate the transition in which fossil fuels are replaced with a system of supply and conversion of renewable energy. These opportunities are highlighted by developing a set of three trajectories, which range from a true supply chain perspective on the energy sector, to an up‐stream and down‐stream perspective, respectively.

Research limitations/implications

The impact of energy resources on carbon emissions makes them important units of analysis in further SCM research. Future research must acknowledge the variety in the nature of energy resources, and provide frameworks that are able to address the particular features of these.

Practical implications

Supply chain strategists must assess how energy use, efficiency, dependency and accessibility influence operations, both internally and externally in the supply chain. Logistics flows are powered by energy. As a considerable portion of carbon emissions created by supply chain operations is energy related, energy must be seen as a means towards achievement of environmental sustainability.

Social implications

Understanding the relationship between energy and SCM will help managers to address environmental sustainability.

Originality/value

This is a timely topic of a cross‐disciplinary nature that has only been addressed to a limited extent by SCM so far. The topic is relevant to a large group of problem owners: supply chain strategists of companies where energy use, efficiency, dependency and security is an issue, and where operations processes have an impact on carbon emissions; for the energy sector, that needs to sustain a steady supply of energy, and increase accessibility to renewable energy sources that can replace fossil fuel; for policy makers, where energy dependency and security at a national level is an issue.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 13 February 2019

Arian Mahzouni

This paper aims to discuss the nexus between two societal (sub) systems of housing and energy supply to shed new light on the key institutional barriers to socio-technical…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to discuss the nexus between two societal (sub) systems of housing and energy supply to shed new light on the key institutional barriers to socio-technical energy transition in the built environment. The key research question is to explore if and how key patterns of institutional elements associated with energy retrofit and energy supply are combined, co-evolved and played out in the housing system, leading to an alternative energy transition pathway in the built environment.

Design/methodology/approach

A comparative case study of residential buildings in the Swiss cities of Basel and Sion is conducted to map retrofitting policies and practices in a wide range of buildings (e.g. multi-family and single family) that each requires a particular constellation of institutions, actors and artefacts.

Findings

The key finding is that the regulative institutions support energy transition in each urban form/housing type. However, the co-evolution with normative and cultural-cognitive institutions does not play out very clearly in the housing system. One reason is that the norms and cultures are deeply rooted in the practices exercised by business community and households and therefore they need a longer time frame to adapt to a new regulation.

Research limitations/implications

The policies and actions to increase the rate of housing retrofit are discussed in the specific socio-political context of Switzerland. Therefore, the results of this study might not be applied in other contexts with different conditions, limiting the possibility for analytical generalization. The case study can generate only context-specific knowledge, which might be valuable only to cities with similar conditions. This paper addresses theoretical, methodological and policy challenges in scaling-up retrofit projects by taking a holistic and integrated approach to the systems of housing and energy supply.

Practical implications

It would have been necessary to find out how the introduction and enforcement of new energy policies and regulations (regulative institutions) have changed the norms and building practices (normative institutions) used by actors from housing industry and the attitudes and energy consumption behaviour of the households (cultural-cognitive institutions). Nevertheless, information about normative and cultural-cognitive institutions require more primary data in the form of interviews with organizations and households, respectively, which goes beyond the scope and resources of this study.

Originality/value

Insights from different strands of literature (institutions and sustainability transition) are combined to understand if and how retrofitting practices go along with other elements of urban sustainability including architectural, technical, socio-cultural and economic factors.

1 – 10 of over 9000