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1 – 10 of 10
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2001

Ed B. Peile and Wendy Briner

New ways of working predicate new ways of learning. Reports on a workshop which examined facilitated case history discussions as a means whereby a team could share and extend…

1122

Abstract

New ways of working predicate new ways of learning. Reports on a workshop which examined facilitated case history discussions as a means whereby a team could share and extend their learning around the common focus of interest – the patient. Discussion in the workshop focused on “how‐to” aspects of small group facilitation. A question stimulated subsequent enquiry about “privileging voices”. Examines how the facilitation enabled interactive, inter‐professional education through an informal form of discourse analysis on the transcripts of the case discussions. The concept of “privileging voices” is demonstrable in the way the authors worked to facilitate the case history discussions.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 6 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 July 2016

Rebecca Lea French and Kirsty Williamson

The purpose of this paper is to explore the nature of information practices of welfare workers and how they fit into daily work of welfare work within a small community sector…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the nature of information practices of welfare workers and how they fit into daily work of welfare work within a small community sector organisation in Victoria, Australia.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was constructivist (interpretivist) in its underpinning philosophy, drawing on both personal constructivist and social constructionist theories. The research methods used, with a sample of 14 welfare workers and two clients, were organisational ethnography and grounded theory. Data collection techniques were interview and participant observation, along with limited document analysis. Data analytic techniques, drawn from grounded theory method, provided a thorough way of coding and analysing data, and also allowed for the development of theory.

Findings

Key findings centre on the role of information in welfare work. Welfare workers mostly used resources to hand, “making do” with resources they already had rather than seeking new ones. They also recombined or re-purposed existing resources to make new resources or to suit new circumstances. Their information practices were found to be fluid, consultative and collaborative. The findings of the research have led to a deep exploration of bricolage as a way to describe both the use of resources and the processes inherent in welfare worker information practices.

Originality/value

The fact that there is a paucity of research focused on information practices of welfare workers in Australia makes the research significant. The bricolage theoretical framework is an original contribution which has implications for exploring other groups of workers and for the design of information systems and technology.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 72 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 February 2007

Valérie‐Inés de La Ville

This paper seeks to conceptualize the field of child and teen consumption as a system of social practices at the cross roads of six strongly intermingled subsystems covering…

1096

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to conceptualize the field of child and teen consumption as a system of social practices at the cross roads of six strongly intermingled subsystems covering social, institutional, technological, narrative, economic, and political stakes. Children's and teens' consumption is shaped and transformed by a mix of managerial action, public policy, cycles of technological change, the evolution of related institutions like parenthood and schooling, changing cultural references, values, modes of socialization as well as by the actions of children and teens themselves.

Design/methodology/approach

Within such a framework, child and teen consumption appears as a complex arena of competing moral and ideological perspectives. In such a volatile context, forms of resistance to ideologies of unending consumption emerge, continuously calling into question the responsibility of business for unwanted long‐term effects.

Findings

The five papers included in this special issue shed light on the complexities of marketing to children by successively exploring the contradictions within the individual, managerial, professional, corporate, and institutional levels. As a direct consequence, the notions of “corporate social responsibility” and “corporate social responsiveness” towards childhood are also constantly evolving concepts which are quite difficult to grasp.

Originality/value

The paper attempts to design a transformative research agenda to promote socially responsible marketing practices and ethically embedded theoretical frameworks. It also stands as an invitation to deepen the indispensable dialogue – albeit often demanding for both sides – between marketing practitioners and social scientists aimed at constantly redefining the moving outline of corporate social responsibility in contemporary children‐oriented markets.

Details

Society and Business Review, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5680

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Torsten J. Gerpott, Sebastian May and Gokhan Nas

In the field of mobile communications services (MCS), it is of importance to segment MCS users to support operators in better tailoring their offers to the needs of specific…

Abstract

Purpose

In the field of mobile communications services (MCS), it is of importance to segment MCS users to support operators in better tailoring their offers to the needs of specific customer groups. This paper analyzes the suitability of national origin of MCS subscribers to segment residential customers into groups with significantly diverging usage behaviors in a sample living in one of the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) member states with a large share of expatriates in its population, particularly from South Asian countries. If MCS use patterns vary considerably between nationals, South Asian migrants and other foreign nationalities, it makes much sense to segment customers at least into these three groups.

Design/methodology/approach

The investigation applies discriminant and regression analysis on a sample of 4,892 residential postpaid MCS customers in a GCC country. The sample comprises individual usage data of 2,446 national citizens and an equal number of non-nationals between July 2014 and July 2015, living in the focal country. The data set was extracted from the billing and customer management systems of a collaborating mobile network operator (MNO).

Findings

The results imply that national origin is a highly significant predictor of individual MCS usage. Nationals and all expatriates primarily differ in international voice and SMS usage but not in established national MCS and mobile internet use intensity. Among expatriates, South Asians consume more national and international voice minutes than migrants originating from other foreign nations.

Research limitations

The analysis is based on objective MCS usage data retrieved from an MNO’s data warehouse. It lacks information on customer perceptions of the utility of various MNO service categories and on other individual characteristics, such as the customers’ level of education or language proficiency. To overcome this limitation, empirical research is needed that incorporates additional objective customer descriptors as well as subjective perceptual constructs.

Practical implications

MNOs are well advised to develop service bundles and tariff portfolios specifically designed for nationals and for different groups of expatriates.

Originality/value

The paper extends the literature on MCS usage behavior in Arab states in general and on customer MCS usage segmentation based on individuals’ national citizenship in particular.

Details

Digital Policy, Regulation and Governance, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5038

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 September 2015

Rana Muhammad Ayyub

There is a growing demand of Halal products and services in a number of non-Muslim countries. Although Muslim consumers have been studied in several research studies but there is…

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Abstract

Purpose

There is a growing demand of Halal products and services in a number of non-Muslim countries. Although Muslim consumers have been studied in several research studies but there is dearth of empirical studies about the perceptions of non-Muslims towards Halal. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the perceptions of non-Muslims towards Halal products and services.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were collected from non-Muslims of UK through snowball sampling technique. In total, 29 interviews were conducted. The consumer perceptions were explored about Halal foods. The qualitative data were analysed for thematic analysis by adopting Spiggle’s steps for data analysis.

Findings

It was found out that majority of the non-Muslims have positive perceptions regarding the Halal products and services as far as quality is concerned. The themes which emerged from these interviews were quality, knowledge about Halal, acculturation and animal welfare issues.

Research limitations/implications

This study will guide the Halal marketers about how to market the Halal products and services from the non-Muslim customers.

Originality/value

This is probably among the rare studies on non-Muslims regarding their perceptions towards Halal.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 117 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 December 2020

Rana Muhammad Ayyub, Saira Naeem, Shehzad Ahmed and Chanaka Jayawardhena

The main purpose of this paper is to study the changing consumer behavior toward broiler meat and apprise its consequences toward food insecurity.

Abstract

Purpose

The main purpose of this paper is to study the changing consumer behavior toward broiler meat and apprise its consequences toward food insecurity.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a sequential exploratory mixed-method study in which qualitative data were collected through semi-structured interviews (n = 38) by snowball sampling. The quantitative data were collected through a questionnaire survey (n = 975) by convenience sampling. The qualitative data were analyzed through NVivo 10 software by using thematic analysis, i.e. the qualitative content analysis (QCA). The theory of consumer alienation provides the theoretical underpinning for a quantitative study. The established scales were adopted and adapted. The quantitative data was analyzed through AMOS 24 software by using structural equation modeling (SEM).

Findings

It was found that people have many reservations regarding broiler meat. Thus, consumer alienation negatively (ß = −0.10) and the subjective norm positively (ß = 0.82) affects the intention to buy broiler meat.

Research limitations/implications

The ongoing consumer alienation toward broiler will force them to avoid using this cheapest protein and ultimately will lead to food insecurity in developing countries. It is recommended that people must be adequately educated about the real broiler business and its operations to counter their ongoing misperceptions.

Originality/value

It is the original empirical Research Work.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 123 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 March 2008

Enrico Scarso and Ettore Bolisani

The aim of the paper is to discuss the critical issues concerning the design and implementation of communities of practice (CoPs), that are increasingly being developed in global…

2292

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of the paper is to discuss the critical issues concerning the design and implementation of communities of practice (CoPs), that are increasingly being developed in global networked corporations to connect dispersed and (semi)autonomous units, departments, and working teams.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper explores, summarises, and discusses the current literature and the reported experience of internal CoPs as a starting‐point to develop a comprehensive and systematic framework of the functioning of such structures.

Findings

An explanatory framework is proposed, which identifies and integrates the main dimensions shaping the creation and management of CoPs.

Research limitations/implications

The proposed speculation is based on a survey of more than 200 studies specifically focusing on CoPs in business environments. Owing to space constraints, only part of this is reported in the reference list, but further details can be requested from the authors. This study can also provide a consistent model for future empirical validations through case‐study analysis or action research.

Practical implications

The suggested framework, identifying the critical dimensions and issues, can be of use for the design and management of CoPs intentionally created by firms.

Originality/value

The study attempts to draw a comprehensive and coherent picture of elements that are generally treated disjointedly, both in academic studies and in practice.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 August 2007

Ong Thian Song, Andrew Teoh Beng Jin and Tee Connie

This paper aims to address some of the practical and security problems when using fingerhash to secure biometric key for protecting digital contents.

2025

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to address some of the practical and security problems when using fingerhash to secure biometric key for protecting digital contents.

Design/methodology/approach

Study the two existing directions of biometric‐based key generation approach based on the usability, security and accuracy aspects. Discuss the requisite unresolved issues related to this approach.

Findings

The proposed Fingerhashing approach transforms fingerprint into a binary discretized representation called Fingerhash. The Reed Solomon error correction method is used to stabilize the fluctuation in Fingerhash. The stabilized Fingerhash is then XORed with a biometric key. The key can only be released upon the XOR process with another Fingerhash derived from an authentic fingerprint. The proposed method could regenerate an error‐free biometric key based on an authentic fingerprint with up to 99.83 percent success rate, leading to promising result of FAR = 0 percent and FRR = 0.17 percent. Besides, the proposed method can produce biometric keys (1,150 bit length) which are longer in size than the other prevailing biometric key generation schemes to offer higher security protection to safeguard digital contents.

Originality/value

Outlines a novel solution to address the issues of usability, security and accuracy of biometric based key generation scheme.

Details

Information Management & Computer Security, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-5227

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 July 2015

Riya Elizabeth George, Nisha Dogra and Bill Fulford

The purpose of this paper is to review the challenges of teaching values and ethics in mental-health, explore the differing perspectives of the key stakeholders and stimulate…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review the challenges of teaching values and ethics in mental-health, explore the differing perspectives of the key stakeholders and stimulate further questions for debate in this area; leading to a proposal of an alternative approach to educating mental-health professionals on values and ethics.

Originality/value

In current mental-health care settings, very few professionals work with homogeneous populations. It is imperative that mental-health education and training ensures health professionals are competent to practice in diverse settings; where ethics and values are bound to differ. Establishing professional practice not only involves considering concepts such as values and ethics, but also equality, diversity and culture. Incorporating values-based practice and cultural diversity training holds promise to education and training, that is truly reflective of the complexity of clinical decision making in mental-health. Further research is needed as to how these two frameworks can be unified and taught.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 November 2010

Sue Kilminster, Miriam Zukas, Naomi Quinton and Trudie Roberts

The aims of this paper are to understand the links between work transitions and doctors' performance and to identify the implications for policy, regulation, practice and research.

910

Abstract

Purpose

The aims of this paper are to understand the links between work transitions and doctors' performance and to identify the implications for policy, regulation, practice and research.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper explains transitions in terms of the inseparability of learning, practice and performance and introduces the concept of the transition as a critically intensive learning period to draw attention to this phenomenon. It also identifies implications for practice, research and regulation

Findings

Drawing on empirical data in relation to prescribing and case management, the paper will show that, in contrast to current assumptions of, understanding about and practice in doctors' transitions, doctors can never be fully prepared in advance for aspects of their work.

Originality/value

Transitions are explained in terms of the inseparability of learning, practice and performance and we introduce the concept of the transition as a critically intensive learning period to draw attention to this phenomenon. Also identified are implications for practice, research and regulation.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 24 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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