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Article
Publication date: 10 May 2021

Syed Abidur Rahman, Mirza Mohammad Didarul Alam, Golam Mostafa Khan and Rowan Elodie Kennedy

This paper examines the predictive role of personality traits on the entrepreneurial bricolage behaviour of female entrepreneurs in a resource-constrained setting.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper examines the predictive role of personality traits on the entrepreneurial bricolage behaviour of female entrepreneurs in a resource-constrained setting.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected using a structured survey questionnaire from female entrepreneurs owning and operating micro-small firms. The analysis and hypotheses testing were performed adopting SEM-PLS3.0 software.

Findings

The results showed that all dimensions of the Big Five personality traits significantly influence entrepreneurial bricolage. In addition, agreeableness, conscientiousness, and intellect were found to be the most important traits in female entrepreneurs for bricolage behaviour.

Practical implications

The results can help provide a better understanding of the linkages between entrepreneurial traits and bricolage. Development agencies may take up this result to ensure the appropriate social inclusion by supporting female entrepreneurs.

Originality/value

To the authors' best knowledge, this paper is the first empirical study that has investigated the relationship between personality traits and entrepreneurial bricolage.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

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Book part
Publication date: 27 August 2013

Ted Baker, Timothy G. Pollock and Harry J. Sapienza

In this study we examine how resource-constrained organizations can maneuver for competitive advantage in highly institutionalized fields. Unlike studies of institutional…

Abstract

In this study we examine how resource-constrained organizations can maneuver for competitive advantage in highly institutionalized fields. Unlike studies of institutional entrepreneurship, we investigate competitive maneuvering by an organization that is unable to alter either the regulative or normative institutions that characterize its field. Using the “Moneyball” phenomenon and recent changes in Major League Baseball as the basis for an intensive case study of entrepreneurial actions taken by the Oakland A’s, we found that the A’s were able to maneuver for advantage by using bricolage and refusing to enact baseball’s cognitive institutions, and that they continued succeeding despite ongoing resource constraints and rapid copying of their actions by other teams. These results contribute to our understanding of competitive maneuvering and change in institutionalized fields. Our findings expand the positioning of bricolage beyond its prior characterization as a tool used primarily by peripheral organizations in less institutionalized fields; our study suggests that bricolage may aid resource constrained participants (including the majority of entrepreneurial firms) to survive in a wider range of circumstances than previously believed.

Details

Entrepreneurial Resourcefulness: Competing With Constraints
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-018-5

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 24 June 2021

Melissa Intindola and Laurel Ofstein

The purpose of this paper is to explore bricolage as the missing link in understanding how cross-sector social partnerships form and operate in response to grand…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore bricolage as the missing link in understanding how cross-sector social partnerships form and operate in response to grand challenges. It is proposed that the weaving together of resources employed by members of cross-sector social partnerships (CSSPs) is bricolage in action and can be linked to Gray's (1985) facilitating conditions for collaboration. While existing research examines bricolage primarily at the individual level, this research studies collective bricolage, as implemented by a cross-sector social partnership in its process to address a grand challenge.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors follow the evolution of a Midwestern initiative aimed at the grand challenge of generational poverty. The deductive case study approach identifies the mechanisms of bricolage being employed in the initiative's evolution and ties these to Gray's (1985) seminal paper on interorganizational collaboration.

Findings

This case study has implications for academics conceptually struggling to understand grand challenges and the role of entrepreneurial initiatives in the public and nonprofit sectors, as well as practitioners currently involved in collaborative efforts to address said challenges.

Originality/value

This study enriches the discussion and enhances the link between the CSSP literature and new notions of social entrepreneurship that embrace the collective as their unit of analysis. This is the first work of its kind to link bricolage to a nascent CSSP and demonstrate how the entrepreneurial concept of bricolage is an inherent part of CSSP formation and operation.

Details

New England Journal of Entrepreneurship, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2574-8904

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Book part
Publication date: 22 July 2011

Lisa K. Gundry, Jill R. Kickul, Mark D. Griffiths and Sophie C. Bacq

Social entrepreneurship is primarily concerned with the development of innovative solutions to society's most challenging problems. Since social entrepreneurship…

Abstract

Social entrepreneurship is primarily concerned with the development of innovative solutions to society's most challenging problems. Since social entrepreneurship flourishes in resource-constrained environments, social innovation may depend on the extent to which social entrepreneurs can combine and apply the resources at hand in creative and useful ways to solve problems – “bricolage.” Moreover, innovating for social impact relies on a set of institutional and structural supports – “innovation ecology,' which can facilitate or impede innovation. Our research empirically examines these variables as drivers of systemic social change through scaling and replication – “catalytic innovation” (i.e., the development of products and services targeted to unserved markets). Results of a survey conducted with 113 social entrepreneurs indicate that, while innovation ecology is associated with the degree of catalytic innovation, it is mediated by the role and degree of bricolage that social entrepreneurs bring to solving problems. These findings reinforce the role of entrepreneurs as the indispensable agents of social change.

Details

Social and Sustainable Entrepreneurship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-073-5

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Book part
Publication date: 14 August 2014

Mikko Rönkkö, Juhana Peltonen and Pia Arenius

Entrepreneurial bricolage has been proposed as a method of alleviating resource constraints of entrepreneurial firms. However, the outcomes of bricolage for a firm may…

Abstract

Entrepreneurial bricolage has been proposed as a method of alleviating resource constraints of entrepreneurial firms. However, the outcomes of bricolage for a firm may vary greatly. One of the most pressing issues is to clarify how bricolage may enhance firm growth. Based on case studies, Baker and Nelson (2005) propose that applying bricolage in limited areas (“selective bricolage”) may enable firms to grow, whereas excessive (“parallel”) bricolage may lead to the opposite outcome. However, the process of testing the generalizability of this relationship using quantitative methods has just begun. In this chapter, we describe our efforts to develop a scale that measures bricolage manifestation in firms by using the “environmental domains” of Baker and Nelson (2005) to facilitate quantitative testing of the bricolage–growth relationship.

Details

Entrepreneurial Resourcefulness: Competing With Constraints
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-018-5

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Article
Publication date: 8 July 2021

Zhenkuo Ding, Guangyu Ye, Sheng Huang and Man Hu

Despite extensive research into the effect of organizational learning processes on firm performance, it remains unclear how and when learning orientation influences the…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite extensive research into the effect of organizational learning processes on firm performance, it remains unclear how and when learning orientation influences the international performance of international new ventures (INVs). Accordingly, the purpose of this paper is to investigate how learning orientation drives the international performance of INVs.

Design/methodology/approach

Structural equation modeling is used to test the research model with questionnaire data from mainland Chinese INVs.

Findings

Results show that: learning orientation positively influences entrepreneurial bricolage; entrepreneurial bricolage positively influences the international performance of INVs; entrepreneurial bricolage plays a mediating role between learning orientation and international performance; degree of internationalization (DOI) weakens the effect of entrepreneurial bricolage on international performance.

Originality/value

This study makes a useful supplement to the INV literature by revealing that entrepreneurial bricolage plays a mediating role in the relationship between learning orientation and the international performance of INVs. It also contributes to the entrepreneurial bricolage literature by introducing entrepreneurial bricolage into the empirical research of INVs and identifying the learning orientation antecedents and performance consequences of entrepreneurial bricolage. In addition, this paper enriches the understanding of the boundary conditions for how entrepreneurial bricolage affects international performance showing that DOI has a negative moderating effect on the relationship between entrepreneurial bricolage and international performance.

Details

Multinational Business Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1525-383X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 10 June 2021

Saeed Mohammadi

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between individual entrepreneurial orientation (IEO) and bricolage behavior, considering the two emerging…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between individual entrepreneurial orientation (IEO) and bricolage behavior, considering the two emerging dimensions of IEO measurement: passion and perseverance.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 187 postgraduate students who have recently started a new business were selected as the research sample. This study aimed to explore the multidimensional perspective of the new IEO construct. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis was applied to examine the hypotheses.

Findings

The results show that along with the enactment of traditional dimensions of IEO, examining the newly introduced dimensions illustrates a distinguished explanation of IEO in resource-scarce environments and leads to a development in entrepreneurial bricolage.

Originality/value

This study examined the IEO construct with two emerging dimensions of IEO measurement: passion and perseverance. This IEO construct is primarily associated with individual behavior and declares bricolage behavior more effectively.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Innovation and Entrepreneurship, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2071-1395

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Article
Publication date: 31 December 2020

Leandro Lima Santos, Felipe Mendes Borini, Moacir de Miranda Oliveira, Dennys Eduardo Rossetto and Roberto Carlos Bernardes

This research aims to answer the following question: Could bricolage become a capability for companies in emerging markets to develop frugal innovations in times of…

Abstract

Purpose

This research aims to answer the following question: Could bricolage become a capability for companies in emerging markets to develop frugal innovations in times of crisis? Therefore, in this paper the main aim is to identify whether in times of crisis the development of frugal innovation in emerging markets depends on the bricolage capability.

Design/methodology/approach

The hypotheses were statistically tested using the structural equation modeling technique, with data collected through the survey method applied to 215 companies in Brazil.

Findings

The results allowed support for the hypothesis that bricolage capability has a positive impact on the development of frugal innovation. Therefore, a mediating test was verified, allowing confirmation that to develop frugal innovation in emerging markets, bricolage becomes a required capability for companies in times of crisis.

Research limitations/implications

The limitation of this study lies in considering the effect of bricolage on frugal innovation only in the context of Brazil, while in developed countries this effect may be similar, as they also suffer from resource constraints caused by crises.

Practical implications

This research provides insights to guide managers by highlighting bricolage as a key managerial capability for the development of frugal innovation. A set of managerial recommendations are provided based on bricolage skills.

Originality/value

The study has contributed to the literature on bricolage and frugal innovation by addressing bricolage as an antecedent of frugal innovation in emerging markets, especially when those markets are affected by resource scarcity.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

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Article
Publication date: 22 February 2021

Haifen Lin and Tingchen Qu

This paper aims to address how an organization's multiple-dominant-logic system evolves as it grows and how does this evolution affect the way managers choose to balance…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to address how an organization's multiple-dominant-logic system evolves as it grows and how does this evolution affect the way managers choose to balance ambidextrous innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper adopts an interpretive and exploratory case study on the mechanism of how the multiple-dominant-logic system influences the decision of balanced ambidextrous innovation. Considering that the multiple-dominant-logic system will change with the development of a firm, this paper focuses on exploring how the evolution of multiple-dominant-logic system affects the way managers choose to balance ambidextrous innovation. The authors spent almost two years collecting data from M-grass Ecology and following the evolution and innovation through semi-structured interviews, archival data and observation. Then they set up a framework showing the influence mechanism by analyzing the data through a four-step process.

Findings

This research points out that an organization's multiple-dominant-logic system may change for several times in its growth. It provides a model for the evolution of a multiple-dominant-logic system. It confirms that firms' multiple-dominant-logic system is not immutable, but evolves with the change of the firm's internal resources and external environment. Also, it finds that under the influence of different multiple-dominant-logic architectures, mangers choose different ways to balance ambidextrous innovation. In this process, appropriate entrepreneurial bricolage plays a significant role in balancing ambidextrous innovation.

Originality/value

The findings offer some valuable insights for further research on dominant logics and ambidextrous innovation and hold important implications for managers making a decision.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 34 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article
Publication date: 17 April 2020

Zhen Liu, Yingzhao Xiao, Shiyao Jiang and Shuang Hu

This study proposes personal network of social entrepreneurs as a key antecedent factor of their resource bricolage to understand the mechanisms underlying social…

Abstract

Purpose

This study proposes personal network of social entrepreneurs as a key antecedent factor of their resource bricolage to understand the mechanisms underlying social entrepreneurial practices before the founding of social enterprises.

Design/methodology/approach

An empirical study is used to collect and analyze data. The questionnaire data are drawn from in-depth semistructured interviews with Chinese social entrepreneurs. This study develops a theoretical framework that draws upon two dimensions of social capital, namely, “ownership” and “use,” to explore relationships among personal network, resource bricolage and relation strength.

Findings

With data from 227 social enterprises in China, empirical results suggest that personal network of social entrepreneurs, that is, the “owned” social capital, shall be transformed by the intermediate role of resource bricolage into relation strength, that is, the “used” social capital. The relationship between resource bricolage and relation strength is positively moderated by the marketization degree and social class of social entrepreneurs.

Research limitations/implications

This study introduces resource bricolage into the front-end course of social entrepreneurship. The results show that similar personal network can lead to different behavioral outcomes in the context of social entrepreneurship. Then the integration of resources and opportunities at the beginning of the social entrepreneurial process opens new avenues for future research. However, this study only investigates the transformation from network to resources implemented by social entrepreneurs before organization establishment. It does not explore potential outcomes of such a transformation for the development of social enterprises.

Practical implications

Social entrepreneurs at the prefounding stage shall make use of the values of available resources, fully use potential interpersonal relations in the personal network, and transform these relations into a close, steady relationship to realize potential values of available resources. Social entrepreneurs can start from excavation and foundation laying of strong relation networks, to avoid problems in legality, social awareness and failure risks generated from blind integration of external resources.

Originality/value

This study finds that social entrepreneurship exists between the motivation of the social entrepreneur and the establishment of the organization after the development over time. Creating first a phased result through the resource bricolage is necessary. This result establishes a complete process chain of social entrepreneurship from motivation to behavior, next to organization establishment and subsequent development. This study is an empirical test based on the theoretical interpretation to make a positive effect on the social entrepreneurship research in the theoretical construction and testing of the deficiencies.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 59 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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