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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1993

C. Edwards and J.W. Peppard

Develops a classification of executive information systems. (EIS).EIS implementations cluster into four distinct groups, called the 4 Cs:Conglomerate; control and…

Abstract

Develops a classification of executive information systems. (EIS). EIS implementations cluster into four distinct groups, called the 4 Cs: Conglomerate; control and monitoring; competitive and intelligence; communication and efficiency. Explores the characteristics of the classes within this taxonomy. Argues, among other things, that the objective use of EIS can be considered as a strategic management aid to top management teams.

Details

Information Management & Computer Security, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-5227

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2000

Hongyi Sun, Ip Kee Hui, Agnes Y.K. Tam and Jan Frick

This paper records the research on the investigation of the empirical relationship between employee involvement (EI) and quality management. It is based on data from a…

8490

Abstract

This paper records the research on the investigation of the empirical relationship between employee involvement (EI) and quality management. It is based on data from a survey of 180 manufacturing companies. The main findings are: EI is positively correlated with total quality management (TQM) enablers; EI is positively correlated with improvements in business performance; EI positively influences the contribution of TQM to the improvement of business performance; EI is marginally related to ISO registration; and EI has no effect on the contribution of ISO 9000 registration. The conclusion is that EI should be incorporated into TQM and ISO 9000 registration. Implications for practice and future research are also discussed.

Details

The TQM Magazine, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-478X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 August 2014

Diane Klare, Melissa Behney and Barbara Ferrer Kenney

The purpose of this article is to review the five emotional intelligence (EI) competencies as originally outlined by Daniel Goleman but within the context of academic…

1788

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to review the five emotional intelligence (EI) competencies as originally outlined by Daniel Goleman but within the context of academic libraries. EI skills can be more important to have than intellectual ability in creating effective organizations. Academic librarians, particularly those in leadership positions, need to be mindful of EI competencies to avoid miscommunication when working with colleagues. Used skillfully, EI has the ability to build more cohesive and stronger collaborations inside and outside the library. EI is just as important for early career librarians as it is for those in senior management positions.

Design/methodology/approach

This article reviews the five EI competencies as originally outlined by Daniel Goleman but within the context of academic libraries. It focuses on empathy to demonstrate how its application in libraries can facilitate teamwork, engender better cooperation and strengthen an organization’s culture.

Findings

Most library literature focuses on EI skills as related to senior-level positions. There is a need for researchers to explore the understanding of EI skills throughout the entire library structure, including how to screen for EI during the hiring process and develop EI skills among existing staff.

Practical implications

Librarians will learn how hiring for EI competencies at all levels will benefit the work environment within academic libraries, as well as how to develop and improve their own EI skills using complementary techniques.

Originality/value

Readers will increase their awareness of how EI can benefit them and their colleagues regardless of whether they have structural (formal) or informal leadership roles in academic libraries, as well as how it leads to professional and personal growth.

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 31 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1992

John J. Regazzi

Growth in the primary engineering literature has been accompanied by a boom in electronic secondary information‐retrieval products and services which can access…

Abstract

Growth in the primary engineering literature has been accompanied by a boom in electronic secondary information‐retrieval products and services which can access information that is increasingly current, specific, and inclusive. While these services provide more options and solutions for researchers, the perception of an overwhelming array of hard‐to‐use electronic searching alternatives has been confusing. Users want an electronic searching system simple enough for library patrons to use, while at the same time sophisticated enough to meet the demands of the professional researcher. Adding to this challenge are the economic realities of the marketplace. Diverse corporate and academic research centers around the world have different levels of budgetary constraints. Recognizing these disparities, Engineering Information Inc. (Ei) has fashioned a range of research tools that can be used individually or in combination to offer maximum budgetary flexibility to its global constituency. Customers wanted from these various tools the opportunity to easily access the most cost‐efficient method dictated by the needs of a particular search.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Article
Publication date: 19 September 2022

Ankita Mishra and Parwinder Singh

Entrepreneurship is one of the significant drivers of economic growth, development and job generation in several countries worldwide. Realizing its significant…

Abstract

Purpose

Entrepreneurship is one of the significant drivers of economic growth, development and job generation in several countries worldwide. Realizing its significant contribution to the nation’s development, policymakers and educators have also drawn attention to fostering entrepreneurship among the youth. Researchers attempted to comprehend the dynamics and investigate the factors influencing entrepreneurial intention (EI). As is true for other abilities and response tendencies, individual differences exist for EI also. This study aims to explore the relationship of emotional intelligence (EIn) and cognitive flexibility (CF) with EI and mediating effect of entrepreneurial self-efficacy (ESE) in the relationship between CF, EIn and EI.

Design/methodology/approach

The cross-sectional survey was conducted to gather responses from 635 individuals aged 17–26 years (M = 19.2, SD = 1.49). The hypotheses were tested using correlation, regression and mediation analysis.

Findings

The findings indicated that EIn and CF were significantly and positively related to EI. Furthermore, ESE was found to be a partial mediator between EIn and EI and a full mediator between CF and EI.

Research limitations/implications

Results reflected the critical significance of ESE and implied that EI might be strengthened by intervening in ESE through various sources.

Originality/value

This study adds to the existing literature by incorporating less studied individual factors (EIn and CF) to better understand EI by explaining the mediation mechanism through ESE.

Details

Journal of Entrepreneurship in Emerging Economies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-4604

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 September 2022

Dan Li and Michael Patterson

This paper aims to determine whether performing an emotional intelligence (EI) intervention improves employees’ self-perceived emotional–social competencies (ESC) to…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to determine whether performing an emotional intelligence (EI) intervention improves employees’ self-perceived emotional–social competencies (ESC) to achieve relational outcomes in firms based in China.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a qualitative, interpretive approach through purposive sampling, this paper explored the impacts the Strengths Deployment Inventory (SDI) 2.0 intervention might have upon Chinese employees regarding ESC and relational outcomes. Data was collected from 18 semi-structured interviews with Chinese executives and individual contributors.

Findings

The findings suggested that ESC could be developed and improved in Chinese employees. The SDI 2.0 intervention may effectively bring about positive EI shifts and relevant attitudinal and behavioral changes related to work relationships.

Practical implications

The developed ESC and relational outcomes provide practitioners with insight to better understand the role training plays in organizational effectiveness, as well as to implement the SDI 2.0 program in human resource practices of Chinese organizations to develop personnel and promote high-quality work relationships.

Originality/value

This study gains significance by highlighting the effectiveness of the SDI 2.0 intervention in enhancing respondents’ ESC with relational outcomes from the perspectives of Chinese firms. Thus, supporting the effectiveness of EI training in the Chinese workplace and introducing the EI training literature the SDI 2.0 tool.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 August 2022

Ambreen Khursheed, Faisal Mustafa, Maham Fatima and Marriam Rao

This study proposes a new comprehensive model of entrepreneurial intentions (EIs) that enhances the understanding of the crucial entrepreneurial personality traits. This…

Abstract

Purpose

This study proposes a new comprehensive model of entrepreneurial intentions (EIs) that enhances the understanding of the crucial entrepreneurial personality traits. This study also examines how entrepreneurial family history, gender and discipline moderate the relationship between the key entrepreneurial personality traits and EIs of university students.

Design/methodology/approach

The study introduces a new combination of important entrepreneurial personality traits, theoretically following the theory of planned behaviour (TPB). The data are collected using an entrepreneurial intention questionnaire and analysed with structural equation modelling (SEM) over a sample of 297 university students from Pakistan.

Findings

The findings highlight that one of the notable contributions to assessing EI is the negative impact of foreseeable challenges (FCs), resulting in negative EIs among university students of our sample. The authors also found significant moderating roles of gender, discipline and entrepreneurial family history in strengthening the relationship between entrepreneurial traits and EIs.

Originality/value

The study contributes both to the existing empirical and theoretical literature by examining a key set of entrepreneurial personality traits leading to enhance EIs. The results may also assist academicians to discover new ways for developing entrepreneurial traits among university students.

Details

Journal of Economic and Administrative Sciences, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1026-4116

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 7 July 2015

Dirk Lindebaum

The processes that underlie ability emotional intelligence (EI) are barely understood, despite decades of management research. Furthermore, the outcomes of these processes…

Abstract

The processes that underlie ability emotional intelligence (EI) are barely understood, despite decades of management research. Furthermore, the outcomes of these processes have been narrowly and prescriptively defined. To address this deficiency, I conducted a phenomenological study (n = 26). Findings from a public sector sample suggest that the underlying emotional processes of meaningful life events are – at least for now – better defined through the construct of emotion regulation. While it is part of the ability EI model, the emotional processing that occurs prior to emotion regulation being initiated is likely to be less consistent with current EI theory. Likewise, these processes lead to outcomes considerably more nuanced than currently appreciated in the EI literature. Consequently, what started as a gap-filling approach to research eventually turned into a problematization of what scholars seem to know about EI. I outline the theoretical and practical implications of this study for management, and offer suggestions for future research.

Details

New Ways of Studying Emotions in Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-220-7

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Entrepreneurship and Emotions: Insights on Venture Performance
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-354-4

Book part
Publication date: 1 July 2013

George S. Benson, Michael Kimmel and Edward E. Lawler

Employee involvement (EI) is a major part of high-performance work systems (HPWS) that have successfully transformed a large number of organizations and have become…

Abstract

Employee involvement (EI) is a major part of high-performance work systems (HPWS) that have successfully transformed a large number of organizations and have become standard practice in many new organizations. Despite the proven benefits of EI, however, it is still not as widely utilized as it could be even when accounting for industry and organization differences in its applicability. We suggest that EI implementation is limited in part by the change management challenges it presents. We review the recent research on EI and HPWS, and suggest ways in which change research and theory can inform our understanding of why EI practices have fallen short of their potential and how they can be effectively implemented.

Details

Research in Organizational Change and Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-891-4

1 – 10 of over 6000