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Article
Publication date: 27 March 2009

Hanbing Yan

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to introduce the overall situation of online teacher training in China, and then to analyze some typical state level e‐training

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to introduce the overall situation of online teacher training in China, and then to analyze some typical state level e‐training projects; second, to describe the problems that most teacher training agencies (TTAs) have. Also, this article presents the background, process and achievement of a practical model – e‐Training Community (eTC) – which integrates the advantages of professional organizations and TTAs.

Design/methodology/approach

This article reviews literature related to Ministry of Education (MOE) policies and general reviews or reports about China's teacher e‐training. The case study approach is applied in this study. The e‐Training Community is a particular cooperative model developed by the Distance Education College of East China Normal University. A survey and interview are applied to gain deep understanding of this model.

Findings

E‐learning is an effective way for teacher education in China to meet the challenge of massive and routine training. The recent projects initiated by MOE show that the trend of e‐training is on the right track. However, China's teacher e‐training still has a long way to go because most TTAs still do not have the ability to implement e‐training by themselves. The eTC model presented in this article shows its strength in solving this problem.

Practical implications

The development of distance education needs professional guidance. How to integrate professional strength of universities and practical strength of local agencies is key to improving the overall quality of teacher e‐training.

Originality/value

This article introduces and analyzes the eTC model, which is a creative model in the field of distance education in China. This model is a good example for professional organizations to push the e‐learning practice.

Details

Campus-Wide Information Systems, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-0741

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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2015

Bello Zainab, Muhammad Awais Bhatti, Faizuniah Bt Pangil and Mohamed Mohamed Battour

– The purpose of this paper is to highlight the factors that aid e-training adoption in the Nigerian civil service.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the factors that aid e-training adoption in the Nigerian civil service.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on a review of past literature from databases, reports, newspapers, magazines, etc. The literature recognised the role of perceived cost, computer self-efficacy, availability of resources and perceived support in e-training adoption. Using technology acceptance model (TAM), this paper explained the importance of these variables in e-training adoption in developing country context.

Findings

The authors found that the combined role of perceived cost, computer self-efficacy, technological infrastructure, Internet facilities, power supply, organisational support, technical support and government support is critical for e-training adoption in developing countries, particularly in Nigeria. Thus, the authors proposed the combination of these variables which would encourage future research on the use of TAM in technology adoption.

Research limitations/implications

This paper gives an elaboration of the role of computer self-efficacy, perceived cost, availability of resources and perceived support with TAM as base of the framework. This provides researchers the opportunity to test the proposed framework empirically and further suggest other variables that can aid e-training adoption in the context of developing country.

Practical implications

The result of this paper can serve as a guide to managers and policymakers to have a better understanding of the requirements for e-training adoption, especially in developing countries. This will go a long way towards designing good policies that could maximise e-training results.

Originality/value

This paper adds to the existing literature on e-training and TAM with the suggestion of proposed variables.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 39 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

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Article
Publication date: 7 July 2014

Hilary R. Mosher and Marcie Desrochers

The purpose of this paper was to evaluate the effectiveness of sustainability information and strategies to change pro-environmental (pro-e) behavior with introductory…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper was to evaluate the effectiveness of sustainability information and strategies to change pro-environmental (pro-e) behavior with introductory environmental science laboratory students.

Design/methodology/approach

A one-group pretest posttest study was used to evaluate a two-hour workshop in which 30 participants were instructed in sustainability education and behavior change strategies. Participants implemented self-management strategies and tracked their energy use every week for two weeks following the pro-e training.

Findings

A significant difference between participants’ baseline and Week 2 energy use assessments was found. The results suggest that the pro-e training increased participants’ energy conservation behavior for their targeted device. Moreover, participants decreased their energy usage for other measured electronic devices, suggesting generalization of treatment effects.

Research limitations/implications

A sizable savings in energy was realized across all participants and devices (approximately 300 hours). However, there was no control group in this one-group pretest posttest study and the effect of reactivity cannot be discounted.

Practical implications

This research suggests that behavior change strategies may be effective at improving pro-e behaviors. The relative ease and low cost of delivering the instruction, and minimal effort on the part of the participant to make behavior changes, provides a solid foundation from which to disseminate sustainability education.

Originality/value

This paper describes a preliminary evaluation of a behavior change approach to teach students about how to change their pro-e behaviors. Limited prior research has examined self-management to alter pro-e behavior.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2003

Abstract

Details

Work Study, vol. 52 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

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Article
Publication date: 3 July 2020

Mumtaz Ali Memon, Rohani Salleh, Muhammad Zeeshan Mirza, Jun-Hwa Cheah, Hiram Ting, Muhammad Shakil Ahmad and Adeel Tariq

This study aims to examine the impact of employees' satisfaction with human resource management (HRM) practices (i.e. training satisfaction, performance appraisal…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the impact of employees' satisfaction with human resource management (HRM) practices (i.e. training satisfaction, performance appraisal satisfaction and pay satisfaction) on work engagement and subsequently employee turnover intentions. The mediating role of work engagement between employee satisfaction with HRM practices and turnover intentions is also assessed.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from Malaysian oil and gas (O&G) professionals. A total of 442 useable questionnaires were obtained for the final data analysis. Partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) was performed to test the hypothesised relationships.

Findings

The findings indicate that training satisfaction and performance appraisal satisfaction are the key drivers of employee engagement at work. Work engagement in turn has a negative impact on employee turnover intentions. Furthermore, work engagement mediates the relationship between employees' satisfaction with HRM practices (i.e. training satisfaction and performance appraisal satisfaction) and turnover intentions. Nevertheless, it did not have any mediating effect on pay satisfaction and turnover intention.

Practical implications

Training plans should be designed to make the relevant jobs more attractive and fulfilling, thus increasing employees' level of work engagement. Besides, ensuring that the appraisal system is fair is pivotal to work engagement. Work engagement will cultivate a strong sense of emotional attachment between employees and employers, thus reducing the turnover intention of Malaysian O&G professionals.

Originality/value

To date, little has been done on employees' satisfaction with HRM practices with respect to their attitudinal and behavioural outcomes. The present study enhances our understanding of the importance of employees' satisfaction with HRM practices and its relation to employees' work engagement and turnover intentions.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 42 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2005

Consuelo L. Waight and Barbara L. Stewart

To investigate how the adult learner is valued in e‐learning corporate settings.

Abstract

Purpose

To investigate how the adult learner is valued in e‐learning corporate settings.

Design/methodology/approach

Case study methodology was used for this research. Four Fortune 500 companies that had active e‐learning initiatives for a minimum of four years were selected. Data for the development of the four cases were collected via semi‐structured telephone interviews. The questions that guided data collection and case development are: what is the e‐learning context in your organization?; How is the adult learner valued in the e‐learning environment?; What considerations must be addressed when valuing the adult learner in e‐learning environments within corporate settings?

Findings

Four case studies emerged from data collection and revealed that adult learners are being valued and supported in corporate e‐learning settings. A comparative analysis of the case studies with the Waight and Stewart conceptual model showed that the e‐learning teams are complying with all factors for the exception of transfer and return on investment.

Research limitations/implications

A primary limitation inherent in this study is its inclusion of only four large corporations. Future investigation can extend understanding of how the adult learner is valued by researching more companies and their e‐learning teams.

Practical implications

These cases provide evidence that adult learners are being valued. They can serve as models for e‐learning teams in their efforts to value the adult learner in e‐learning within corporate settings.

Originality/value

Although a body of literature related to valuing adults in academic settings exists, little investigation has been done in corporate contexts. This study confirms that adult learners are valued in e‐learning in corporate settings.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 17 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2002

Kostas Metaxiotis, John Psarras and Stefanos Papastefanatos

Knowledge management has recently received considerable attention in the computer information systems community and is continuously gaining interest from industry…

Abstract

Knowledge management has recently received considerable attention in the computer information systems community and is continuously gaining interest from industry, enterprises and government. As we move towards building knowledge organizations, knowledge management in combination with information management will play a fundamental role towards the success of transforming individual knowledge into organizational knowledge. In this framework, this paper discusses the key concepts of human‐computer interaction in knowledge management, identifies new challenges of knowledge management for Web‐based business and proposes a “user agent architecture” for knowledge management in e‐learning environments. User agents use artificial neural network technology and can be used in various e‐learning or e‐training environments, in order to provide them with means of managing information stored, filtering content and enabling better knowledge adoption on behalf of their users.

Details

Information Management & Computer Security, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-5227

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1989

John Hayes and Tony Dunn

A common approach towards enhancing managerial effectiveness is tofocus attention on improving the knowledge and skill of the manager,i.e. training. This approach assumes…

Abstract

A common approach towards enhancing managerial effectiveness is to focus attention on improving the knowledge and skill of the manager, i.e. training. This approach assumes that the main barrier to effectiveness is some deficiency in the individual. A quick and simple approach to diagnosing problems associated with the manager′s role which arise from the way it has been defined and structured is presented that relies heavily on Mintzberg′s description of a manager in terms of a set of roles.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 19 June 2007

Lars Unneberg

The aim of this paper is to discuss the key issues of deployment for large enterprises keen to adopt new web‐based learning techniques.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to discuss the key issues of deployment for large enterprises keen to adopt new web‐based learning techniques.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper complements the writer's own expertise with external research and reference to large enterprise scale e‐training deployments recently implemented for global companies, including PepsiCo.

Findings

The paper finds that big business is waking up to the efficiency and cost benefits of wide‐scale e‐learning deployment.

Originality/value

This paper launches the debate for enterprise wide e‐learning architectures in large companies.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 39 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 31 May 2013

Yong Han, Jing‐jing Zhang and Sheng‐tao Huang

The purpose of this paper is to describe how public‐sector organizations in the Chinese autonomous region of Guangxi Zhuang are applying e‐HRM practices.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe how public‐sector organizations in the Chinese autonomous region of Guangxi Zhuang are applying e‐HRM practices.

Design

Concentrates on the operation of e‐recruitment, e‐training, e‐compensation, e‐benefits and e‐appraisal.

Findings

Reports that blended conventional and electronic HRM practices exist and are likely to continue for a little while into the future.

Practical implications

Reveals that, where e‐HRM is being used, its prime benefit is in reducing the amount of repetitive paperwork that HR specialists have to carry out.

Social implications

Explains that there is still a tendency for people to work too hard in the Chinese civil service, partly because it is seen as the decent thing to do and partly for employees to earn a lot of money. But there are signs, too, that increasing numbers of employees are seeking a decent work‐life balance.

Originality/value

Reveals how e‐HRM operates in the context of the Chinese public sector.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

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