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Article

Tung-Hsuan Wan, Yun-Shu Hsu, Jehn-Yih Wong and Shin-Hao Liu

Human capital is the most important determinant of the Hospitality industry’s success. Executive chefs should be skilled in both management and culinary arts, in addition…

Abstract

Purpose

Human capital is the most important determinant of the Hospitality industry’s success. Executive chefs should be skilled in both management and culinary arts, in addition to ensuring the success of the entire hospitality division. The study aims to understand the competencies of executive chefs in international tourist hotels in Taiwan.

Design/methodology/approach

Literature review and behavioral event interviews were conducted with ten executive chefs and executive sous chefs. The modified Delphi method verified the results using 15 experts.

Findings

A competency framework was created, with four quadrants – managerial, operational, behaviors and skills – to classify executive chefs’ competencies. Each competency was further divided into sub-competencies – culinary research, emotional control, negotiation skills, job guidance and proactive thinking ability – for 25 items. Quadrants I and II are hard competencies that can be improved through education and training, whereas the third and fourth are soft competencies that require more time for development in workers.

Practical implications

The two-step study developed a competency framework with a practical reference value. The study results could be utilized by human resources managers during their companies’ training, recruitment, selection and promotion.

Originality/value

Besides the Delphi method, a deep behavioral event interview that enabled determining critical competencies was also used to collect data. The results obtained could be used to structure schools’ curricula. Collaborations between the hospitality industry and schools could help develop better curricula and training plans to maximize the availability of educational resources.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 29 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article

Dorothy Griffiths

The problem of how to weight technical expertise is familiar to anyone concerned with the design and implementation of company job evaluation schemes, and nowhere is this…

Abstract

The problem of how to weight technical expertise is familiar to anyone concerned with the design and implementation of company job evaluation schemes, and nowhere is this problem more acute than in Research and Development (R & D) departments. Here, typically, there are large numbers of highly qualified technical specialists who both deserve and demand promotion on the basis of their technical contribution. Yet, because technical staff have relatively few of the kind of responsibilities which carry high weighting on most job evaluation schemes, they rarely warrant higher grading on conventional criteria. And where they are promoted, their excellence as scientists wins them promotion into research management. In a recent study conducted by the author, concerning the reasons why R&D staff in a large UK company sought posts elsewhere in the organisation, the belief that promotion was easier to get outside R&D was one of the most important factors. A dual ladder system may offer a partial solution to this problem. By a dual ladder is meant the establishment of two parallel hierarchies within R & D: a management ladder and a ladder for technical specialists. The two ladders carry different responsibilities but equivalent rewards and status. In theory, at least, a distinction is made between responsibility for resources, located on the management ladder, and responsibility for technical merit, located on the technical ladder.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article

Steven J. Cesare and Coleen Thornton

Illustrates the key differences between two distinct sub‐populationsemployed by most organizations: specialistsand generalists. Specialists are defined as…

Abstract

Illustrates the key differences between two distinct sub‐populations employed by most organizations: specialists and generalists. Specialists are defined as those professionals who are trained in a singular discipline, are concerned with increasing and perfecting their skills, and value recognition from their specialist peers. In direct contrast, generalists possess a macro orientation characterized more by breadth of knowledge than depth, are more loyal to their employing organization than a professional group, and aspire to climb the corporate hierarchy as it exists. Clearly, these two groups represent divergent interests, goals and needs. Consequently, they impose serious demands on the organization in general and on its human resources department to provide an appropriate set of programmes, along with a facilitating environment, in order to optimize their performance. Organizes these issues into four human resource management areas: recruitment, development, motivation and retention. Provides applied documentation substantiating effectiveness in each area.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

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Book part

Berat Cicek

In this study, the concept of career, which is one of the most significant functions of human resources, is examined. Toward the end of the twentieth century, restricted…

Abstract

In this study, the concept of career, which is one of the most significant functions of human resources, is examined. Toward the end of the twentieth century, restricted models, in which individuals work in a workplace in a classical manner, have been replaced by more flexible models. Due to certain reasons such as changing environmental conditions, increasing education levels, and the impact of employee’s values on his/her work life, individuals’ work life have been dramatically changed. Therefore, some career approaches oriented for these changing conditions and current requirements have been proposed by both academicians and professionals. These approaches mostly include removing workplace limits, offering the opportunity to work from anywhere, using various skills at different departments without any limitations. Basing on the aforementioned changes in theory and practice, this study investigates up-to-date career approaches in a holistic manner. In this context, the background and practicability of these theoretically framed approaches are also discussed in the present study

Details

Contemporary Global Issues in Human Resource Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-393-9

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Article

Flora Maria Diaz‐Perez

Reports a study of a Canary Island “internal labourmarket” (a transnational cigarette manufacturer) analysing itspromotion ladders and ports of entry. Results reflect the…

Abstract

Reports a study of a Canary Island “internal labour market” (a transnational cigarette manufacturer) analysing its promotion ladders and ports of entry. Results reflect the importance an employee attaches to years of service in a firm and describes the general characteristics of the internal components of the internal labour market.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

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Article

Zmira Laufer

One of the known sources of anxiety in the professional workplace today is professional obsolescence, which has been defined as the “loss of once‐held knowledge and the…

Abstract

One of the known sources of anxiety in the professional workplace today is professional obsolescence, which has been defined as the “loss of once‐held knowledge and the failure to become familiar and knowledgeable about new knowledge in one's professional field”. However, the researchers who have dealt with this problem have come mainly from the technological professions, and have therefore tended to concentrate on the role of the professional within an industrial organisation. These investigators contend that obsolescence can have considerable influence on behaviour, such as causing professionals to leave their chosen field, or bringing about a drop in the level of their productivity and personal performance, or altering the course of their career.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article

Thomas N. Garavan and Michael Coolahan

Reviews the literature on career mobility and considers its implications for career development practices within organizations. Focuses on individualistic and…

Abstract

Reviews the literature on career mobility and considers its implications for career development practices within organizations. Focuses on individualistic and organizational perspectives and identifies a range of factors which facilitate or inhibit the mobility process. Identifies a range of career development implications including changing notions about what constitutes a career, the need to take into account business issues and the move towards joint career planning.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Article

Lucas van Wees and Paul Jansen

The system of two career ladders, one for managers, the other for(top‐level) specialists or professionals, has worked satisfactorily upto a certain level. There are…

Abstract

The system of two career ladders, one for managers, the other for (top‐level) specialists or professionals, has worked satisfactorily up to a certain level. There are, however, indications that there will be a change in the “natural” career progression in the near future. Responsible for this are rising educational level of the workforce, onset of lean, knowledge‐driven companies which are competence‐based, and doubts about the effectiveness of the classical manager. Studies the concept of a “career”, and current changes in career motivations and opportunities of managers and professionals. To illustrate, describes how three large Dutch companies recruit their future top‐level managers and professionals. In particular, the career aspirations and opportunities of an important group of professionals, viz. engineers will be investigated. Finally, suggests how to align career path and motives with organizational requirements, both for managers and for professionals. Compares HRM policy with the way in which Japanese companies manage careers and transitions between managers and professionals.

Details

International Journal of Career Management, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6214

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Article

In the last four years, since Volume I of this Bibliography first appeared, there has been an explosion of literature in all the main functional areas of business. This…

Abstract

In the last four years, since Volume I of this Bibliography first appeared, there has been an explosion of literature in all the main functional areas of business. This wealth of material poses problems for the researcher in management studies — and, of course, for the librarian: uncovering what has been written in any one area is not an easy task. This volume aims to help the librarian and the researcher overcome some of the immediate problems of identification of material. It is an annotated bibliography of management, drawing on the wide variety of literature produced by MCB University Press. Over the last four years, MCB University Press has produced an extensive range of books and serial publications covering most of the established and many of the developing areas of management. This volume, in conjunction with Volume I, provides a guide to all the material published so far.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article

D.N. Ashton and M.J. Maguire

In recent years a considerable amount of work has been done in Britain and America utilising dual labour market theory. In America, the ideas of Doeringer and Piore have…

Abstract

In recent years a considerable amount of work has been done in Britain and America utilising dual labour market theory. In America, the ideas of Doeringer and Piore have been taken up by radical economists such as Edwards and Bluestone, while in Britain a group of Cambridge economists have also been seeking to develop the theory. These studies have all retained the basic duality incorporated in the theory by Doeringer and Piore. Moreover, the work of Barron and Norris, Bosanquet and Doeringer and Blackburn and Mann has provided some qualified empirical support to the notion of two separate labour markets.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 11 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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