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Article

Danai Thienphut, Suriya Jiamprachanarakorn, jirusth sirasirirusth and Rachen Boonloisong

This paper aims to study the key success factors (KSFs) that determine the direction and context of a new university, Suan Dusit Rajabhat University (SDU), to formulate…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to study the key success factors (KSFs) that determine the direction and context of a new university, Suan Dusit Rajabhat University (SDU), to formulate strategic human capital management (SHCM) for the university, and also to recommend a proposal for the human resources (HR) structure and systems that supports SHCM for a new university.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used mixed methods. There were four steps, including documentary research to develop a draft of SHCM prototype, in-depth interview and knowledge-sharing technique with 17 key informants to develop the underlying final SHCM prototype, collecting the quantitative data from a questionnaire to develop a prototype of SHCM, and validation and confirmation of the suitability and feasibility of SHCM for a new university by using a focus group and knowledge-sharing technique with 14 HR experts and re-confirm for practical implementation with SDU’s executive team.

Findings

The four KSFs were university positioning, talent capability, harmonization, and transformation. The SHCM formulation was categorized into two sections: components including strategy on thinking and planning, implementation and measurement; and procedures including HR policy committee, strategic and operational HR management. The HR proposal for implementation was emerging.

Originality/value

The tacit knowledge in SHCM, including human capital-centric driving for KSFs and innovative HR in university transformation comprising of the strategic and operational levels, was revealed.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Book part

Russell Coff, Andy El-Zayaty, Martin Ganco and John K. Mawdsley

Firm-specific human capital (FSHC) has been an integral part of the vocabulary in the strategy field. Many scholars argue that FSHC inhibits employee mobility and drives…

Abstract

Firm-specific human capital (FSHC) has been an integral part of the vocabulary in the strategy field. Many scholars argue that FSHC inhibits employee mobility and drives employee retention at a discount, value appropriation, and firms' competitive advantage. FSHC also plays a central role in the resource-based view of the firm. In recent years, however, a significant debate has emerged on the validity and usefulness of the construct. The purpose of the chapter is to revisit this debate and discuss both challenges and opportunities related to FSHC. In a form of conversation, we take aim at FSHC from different angles and discuss its role as a mobility friction, in value appropriation of established firms, in the context of transitions between paid employment and entrepreneurship, and in the views of practitioners. While we agree that our understanding of the concept of FSHC must evolve, we continue to see its value in our theoretical toolbox.

Details

Employee Inter- and Intra-Firm Mobility
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-550-5

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Article

Min-Shi Liu and Nien-Chi Liu

According to human capital theory, companies derive economic value from the knowledge, skills and abilities (KSAs) of their employees. Research conducted by strategic human

Abstract

Purpose

According to human capital theory, companies derive economic value from the knowledge, skills and abilities (KSAs) of their employees. Research conducted by strategic human resource management has focused on how investment in human capital can create a competitive advantage for an organization. The purpose of the paper is, therefore, to investigate how the choice of different human capital acquisition strategies – “make or buy” – can influence employee attitudes and behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

This study explores the relationship between internal and external human capital strategies and employee’s attitudes and behavior in Taiwan's IC (integrated circuit) design industry. The cross-sectional dataset derives from a sample of 49 human resource departments and 497 employees from 25 different IC design companies.

Findings

The findings indicate that the decisions made on human capital strategies have an important influence on employee’s attitude and behavior. The results also show that a climate of trust and perceived organizational support is a cross-level mechanism for both human capital strategy and employees' attitudes and behavior.

Originality/value

There has been little research on the cross-level analysis of human capital acquisition strategies that can influence employee’s attitudes and behavior. This study verified that internal and external human capital strategies do affect employees' individual perceptions of organizational support via the organizational-level climate of trust, which in turn influences employees' attitudes and behavior. This cross-level mechanism indeed will facilitate new insights into the nature of strategic human resource management.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Case study

Erika Hayes James and Tom Cross

There are two key principles in human capital strategy. One is that people are assets whose value can be enhanced through investment. The other is that an organization's…

Abstract

There are two key principles in human capital strategy. One is that people are assets whose value can be enhanced through investment. The other is that an organization's human capital policies must be aligned to support the organization's shared vision. Excerpts from two GAO reports provide an excellent summary of the topic.

Details

Darden Business Publishing Cases, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2474-7890
Published by: University of Virginia Darden School Foundation

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Article

Nagwan Abdulwahab AlQershi, Sany Sanuri Mohd Mokhtar and Zakaria Bin Abas

This paper examines the interaction of human capital and CRM on the performance of SMEs in Yemen.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper examines the interaction of human capital and CRM on the performance of SMEs in Yemen.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used a quantitative approach in investigating the interacting effect of human capital on the relationship between CRM and SMEs' performance in Yemen. The PLS-SEM analysis was performed to test the hypotheses.

Findings

It was observed that key customer focus, technology-based CRM and CRM knowledge management were effective drivers of SME performance, but not CRM organization tools. It was also ascertained that human capital has no moderating effect on the key customer focus and knowledge management relationships with performance, although it does moderate the relationships between performance and CRM organization and technology-based CRM respectively.

Research limitations/implications

Because this study is limited to manufacturing SMEs in Yemen, the results cannot be generalized to other types of industry such as services, whose structure and vision differ from those of manufacturing SMEs. While the current results may be appropriate for SMEs in other developing countries, the researcher believes they are unsuitable for SMEs in advanced economies with different financial structures and employee and management cultures.

Practical implications

The empirical insights of this study are valuable for the owners, managers and professionals in the SMEs manufacturing sector in developing countries, to enrich their organizational performance through CRM adoption, while considering the moderating effect of human capital.

Originality/value

This is the first empirical work to confirm way the main drivers of human capital, including in the analysis the impact of CRM dimensions and SME performance, in the context of the manufacturing sector. In support of an original conceptual model, the insights contribute to the literature on CRM, SMEs in the manufacturing sector, human capital and emerging economies.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

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Book part

John P. Koeplin and Pascal Lélé

Integrating interdisciplinary studies with Human Capital Management Accounting (HCMA) refers to the dynamics of organized interdisciplinary action that are transversal or…

Abstract

Integrating interdisciplinary studies with Human Capital Management Accounting (HCMA) refers to the dynamics of organized interdisciplinary action that are transversal or cross-cutting. This approach requires the mastery of a certain number of technical skills and disciplines, as well as the capacity to use them in a process to solve problems of financial performance. This is accomplished through the specific interaction tasks that are performed by each management function and operational unit, which act in real time with others, in the same direction as an organizational team, using a selected risk appetite threshold base.

Putting business fields side by side, (i.e., business disciplines silos, as is normally the case in MBA programs), is not enough to create the transversal interaction dynamic needed for firms to achieve expected financial performance goals. As a result, few graduates today have the cross-cutting or vertical skills required to act, in real time, from their workstation in accordance with the pyramid shape of the organization chart in order to create value.

This chapter presents the results of the interface established by a faculty member in the Accounting Department of the University of San Francisco with a “seasoned leader in the FinTech industry.” It proposes a single portal for employers and HRMs to which the continuing education services of professional training associations, executive education departments of colleges, and MBA schools and universities, can connect to issue the HCMA certificate supplementing their training offerings focused on “Leadership Development”.

Details

Recent Developments in Asian Economics International Symposia in Economic Theory and Econometrics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-359-8

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Article

Francesco Baldi and Lenos Trigeorgis

There has been a long controversy in the literature on assessing the value of human capital – a long-sought but elusive and challenging task. The ability to quantify…

Abstract

Purpose

There has been a long controversy in the literature on assessing the value of human capital – a long-sought but elusive and challenging task. The ability to quantify flexible human capital (FHC) has been a shortcoming in extant literature. We make a meaningful contribution by showing how real options (RO) methodology can be used to quantify FHC and we provide complementary case study evidence from Fortune 500 “best companies to work for” that the value of employee career development is higher in more volatile sectors in line with real options theory (ROT).

Design/methodology/approach

This article provides a prescriptive RO methodology for adopting a more flexible, staged SHRM organizational perspective suitable for uncertain environments, and explores its theoretical and empirical implications through the dual use of RO methodological modelling and multi-case study data involving ten Fortune 500 companies. The case study approach is aimed at creating managerially relevant knowledge. The relevance of our approach to managerial practice is shown through guidelines on how a company like Google might use the RO methodology to estimate the career development option value so as to inform its internal development program for employees to create and capture value.

Findings

Our focus is on the staging flexibility in HR as exemplified by the internal career development process. This process can be viewed as a multi-stage (compound) option involving various types of HC uncertainty, HC options, and HR practices. We model staging HR deployment via the option to promote staff employees to middle-level management, itself embedding the option to rise to the top management. To empirically validate our valuation approach, we present case study research that enables quantifying the option value of a career development program and allows assessing how much a mismatch exists in a sample of ten public U.S. companies.

Research limitations/implications

The overall staging quantification idea is important as it offers guidance as to how to value HR as a sequential investment process under uncertain demand or skill conditions. The analysis is limited to the extent that staged career development might interact with other types of human capital (e.g. switch and learning) options and HR practices (e.g. training). Human resources may also interact with other organizational intangibles, such as brand equity. Our analysis also does not account for psychological considerations from the employees' perspective, such organizational commitment facilitating trust to enable reciprocal commitments, which remains a fruitful subject for future extensions.

Practical implications

ROT can provide useful guidance and tools for HR scholars and managers. By keeping tabs on HR-based flexibility value and focusing on the key input variables driving HR flexibility, HR managers can determine the flexibility value unleashed from staging the deployment of HC resources in the face of unanticipated demand and skills shifts.

Originality/value

This is the first paper that attempts to quantify the value of staged career development flexibility using the RO methodology. This article will be cited for its innovativeness in being the first to quantify the value of human capital's contribution to corporate value creation and provide objective evaluation in the context of organizational career-development programs. Besides providing useful insights to scholars, the article also demonstrates how the RO methodology can apply to actual companies and inform managerial practice offering guidelines of relevance to HR practitioners on how to quantify the value of staged HC development in an uncertain environment.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

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Article

Artie W. Ng, Jay Chatzkel, K.F. Lau and Douglas Macbeth

China's emerging multinationals (CEMs) have gained attention for their increasing activities in mergers and acquisitions (M&As) within the global arena. Harnessing…

Abstract

Purpose

China's emerging multinationals (CEMs) have gained attention for their increasing activities in mergers and acquisitions (M&As) within the global arena. Harnessing previous studies about the significance of their cultural baggage and an underlying strategic intent in reverse technology transfer through cross‐border M&As, the purpose of this paper is to explore the dynamics of CEMs in their process of cross‐border M&As through the perspectives of intellectual capital.

Design/methodology/approach

Building on an interdisciplinary literature review, a theoretical framework is devised to exemplify such dynamics within a CEM during the course of reverse technology transfer and swift transformation into a global enterprise for technological innovation through M&As. A longitudinal case study is adopted to examine how two technology‐based CEMs continue to modify and reconfigure their respective committed intellectual capital resources while undergoing cross‐border M&A transactions.

Findings

The study suggests the relevance of a conceptual framework and unveils a causal development of dynamic capabilities that is evidenced by resource reconfiguration and post‐merger performance. It further reveals a reinforced dynamic capability development process that would enhance reverse technology transfer for domestic rather than overseas market development while pursuing equilibrium of knowledge.

Originality/value

This is an original paper that explores the cultural dynamics of CEMs and what influences their intellectual capital development during their cross‐border M&As. This paper articulates that CEMs need to create their own unique intellectual capital that contributes constructively to their international operations throughout their post‐merger integrations.

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Article

Lorenzo Ardito, Viviana D'Angelo, Antonio Messeni Petruzzelli and Enzo Peruffo

This paper adopts an intellectual capital perspective to investigate the role of owners who are ethnic minorities in the foreign market expansion performance of SMEs, and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper adopts an intellectual capital perspective to investigate the role of owners who are ethnic minorities in the foreign market expansion performance of SMEs, and in particular considers the human capital dimension of intellectual capital.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the empirical investigation of a sample of 10,326 small- and medium-sized US high-tech manufacturing enterprises, the authors’ results reveal a positive relationship between the number of foreign markets where these SMEs operate and their financial performance, and that this effect is reinforced by the presence of ethnic minority owners, as ethnic minorities constitute a valuable source of intellectual capital which bring value to firms.

Findings

The authors’ findings reveal the importance of intellectual capital in an SME’s leadership position, specifically in terms of having individuals from normally disadvantaged groups as owners. In this sense, policymakers are crucial in supporting the inclusion of ethnic minorities in SME ownership, through advantageous treatment in firms, for example.

Practical implications

The study presents practical implications for managers seeking foreign market expansion. In addition, when defining ownership structure (e.g., in the start-up phase), the role of human capital, in the form of ethnic minorities, should not be neglected, especially if an SME intends to operate or is already operating in different national contexts.

Originality/value

The authors’ results provide important insights into the positive effect of human capital on SME foreign market performance. The idea of a moderating role played by owners from ethnic minorities suggested here contributes to the literature on human capital and is one of the first attempts to consider this moderating factor in this relationship, especially in the SME context.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 22 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

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Article

Laurie Bassi and Daniel McMurrer

The article describes the constraints of the current system for accounting for the value and importance of an organization’s human capital. It describes the Human Capital

Abstract

The article describes the constraints of the current system for accounting for the value and importance of an organization’s human capital. It describes the Human Capital Capability Scorecard (HCCS), which allows for better valuation of human capital, and examines the implementation of that HCCS system inside diverse organizations, and analyzes the relationship between human capital indices and organizational outcomes. The article describes the composition of five human capital indices, and examines their relationship to key organizational outcomes in a manufacturing firm, public school district, and consortium of banks and finds that human capital indices are positively related to a variety of organizational outcomes, including sales office effectiveness, student achievement test scores, and summary financial measures such as net income per employee. Future research should focus on the application of standard measures of human capital across additional organizations, and seek to more fully explore the effects of specific human capital items. The article suggests that organizations should devote significantly more attention to measuring their human capital in a way that recognizes its value, and that reporting such information publicly will help publicly traded organizations to avoid the too‐common short‐term focus on quarterly earnings. New quantitative evidence is provided to executives about the importance of human capital and methods for human capital and people‐related factors to be more appropriately measured, valued, and reported by organizations are suggeted.

Details

Handbook of Business Strategy, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1077-5730

Keywords

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