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Article
Publication date: 15 December 2021

Lise Johns, Stacey Weightman, Pippa Blackburn and Donna McAuliffe

The purpose of this study is to explore the psychosocial aspects of palliative care provision for incarcerated persons drawing on a human rights perspective.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore the psychosocial aspects of palliative care provision for incarcerated persons drawing on a human rights perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

Seven databases were searched to identify empirical studies published from 2010 to 2020. Articles included were qualitative, quantitative, mixed methods, written in English and with westernised health/prison settings, with a key focus on the psychosocial aspects of palliative care provision and human rights. The quality of the articles was appraised using the Mixed Methods Assessment Tool (2018).

Findings

The results from 26 articles revealed multiple models of care, with the US prison hospice program depicted as optimal, because of the use of trained incarcerated caregivers, working as aides to the interprofessional team. The bereavement needs of caregivers were highlighted. The barriers to adequate psychosocial care were negative public discourse, prison processes and resources, provider attitudes and the incarcerated person’s level of knowledge and trust. Identified facilitators were related to incarcerated persons’ caregiving programs, a sense of purpose and visitation leniency. Human rights principles were identified in studies that featured compassionate release and advance care planning.

Research limitations/implications

There is inconsistency in the literature regarding what constitutes psychosocial care, which meant that the authors needed to draw on multiple literature sources to formulate a definition. Additionally, the review only included studies written in English, meaning some high-quality studies could have been missed. The articles that conducted interviews with incarcerated individuals were undertaken in male prisons only and not female prisons.

Practical implications

Understanding the importance of psychosocial care for incarcerated persons with a life-limiting illness requires a shift in negative public discourse and the need for a stronger human rights focus. Some countries, such as the USA and UK, are achieving effective outcomes; however, countries such as Australia are yet to contribute to this knowledge base.

Originality/value

If palliative care is a human right, then its philosophy should be considered in its entirety, with the inclusion of psychosocial care.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 September 2011

Margaret McAllister, Shirley Morrissey, Donna McAuliffe, Graham Davidson, Harry McConnell and Prasuna Reddy

It is now common place for mental health services to operate using multidisciplinary teams (MDTs) where several health professionals simultaneously maintain their…

722

Abstract

Purpose

It is now common place for mental health services to operate using multidisciplinary teams (MDTs) where several health professionals simultaneously maintain their disciplinary distinctiveness and assume complementary professional roles. This requires awareness of other team members' disciplines and good team‐work skills. Yet in Australia, the preparation of health professionals continues to occur primarily in single‐discipline programs, where interaction with other disciplines often only occurs in an ad hoc, time‐limited way during clinical placement. This paper seeks to provide serious reflection on preparing students for the multidisciplinary practice within the mental health system.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors introduce a student placement preparation learning package that was developed and trialled with a range of health professional students at two Australian universities. Transformative learning principles underpinned the development of the education materials and related activities, which were designed to sensitise students to the potential problems that arise within MDTs and to equip them with communication strategies for use in their university placement experiences, as well as in their future professional practice.

Findings

The very large majority of student placement preparation workshop participants rated the workshop activities as extremely helpful. After participating in the activities, the very large majority of participants strongly endorsed the workshop learning objectives of understanding the different roles of MDTs members, skills required for working in MDTs, principles of collaborative team‐work and respectful, positive attitudes to MDTs members.

Originality/value

The transformative learning approaches to education of health professionals which are described in this paper help students to examine ways to think more critically and constructively about MDTs.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 16 September 2011

Di Bailey

328

Abstract

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1990

Anne E. Zald and Cathy Seitz Whitaker

Despite the title of this bibliography, there was not a truly underground press in the United States during the 1960s and 1970s. The phrase is amisnomer, reputedly coined…

Abstract

Despite the title of this bibliography, there was not a truly underground press in the United States during the 1960s and 1970s. The phrase is amisnomer, reputedly coined on the spur of the moment in 1966 by Thomas Forcade when asked to describe the newly established news service, Underground Press Syndicate, of which he was an active member. The papers mentioned in this bibliography, except for the publications of the Weather Underground, were not published by secretive, covert organizations. Freedom of the press and of expression is protected by the First Amendment to the Constitution, although often only symbolically as the experience of the undergrounds will show, and most of the publications that fall into the “underground” described herein maintained public offices, contracted with commercial printers, and often used the U.S. Postal Service to distribute their publications.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Article
Publication date: 13 November 2017

Hamid Rizal and Hanudin Amin

The purpose of this study is to develop a conceptual model explicating Muslims intention towards charitable giving of cash waqf. Drawing from altruism theoretical…

1399

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to develop a conceptual model explicating Muslims intention towards charitable giving of cash waqf. Drawing from altruism theoretical paradigm, the present study investigates the role of perceived ihsan, Islamic egalitarian and Islamic religiosity on cash waqf contribution.

Design/methodology/approach

The survey method using Islamic banking respondents were exploited for data collection. A total sample of 264 completed questionnaires were analysed.

Findings

The results of exploratory factor analysis indicate strong constructs nomological validity. The structural equation modelling using path analysis was also performed to estimate the proposed research framework. The result of model testing shows significant relationship between perceived ihsan, Islamic egalitarian and Islamic religiosity on cash waqf contribution.

Practical implications

The results suggest that perception of ihsan and notion of equality significantly influences Muslims’ sense of religiosity, which subsequently encourages the generosity giving behaviour of waqf. Implications of the findings and suggestions for future research are also discussed.

Originality/value

The study introduces two new dimensions of perceived ihsan and Islamic egalitarian. Specifically, the present study offers fresh new insights of charitable giving of cash waqf behaviours from Islamic perspective.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Drawing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-325-3

Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2000

Donna B. Barnes, Audrey Alforque and Khalil Carter

HIV and AIDS case surveillance continues to reflect the disproportionate impact of the epidemic on racial/ethnic minority populations, especially women, youth and…

Abstract

HIV and AIDS case surveillance continues to reflect the disproportionate impact of the epidemic on racial/ethnic minority populations, especially women, youth and children. The HIV antibody test is the standard method for identifying people with HIV and the primary prevention model to promote treatment and the reduction of HIV transmission. Given the incidence of HIV in women, it is important to understand the conditions under which women receive and interpret the results of their positive HIV antibody tests, in order to promote access to and continued health care. Our study demonstrates that how individuals are told the results of their HIV antibody test and what pre- and post-counseling is given, if any, can influence individuals' medical care and prevention of transmission of HIV to others. The important issue, it seems, for post-test counseling and accessing HIV health care is to address women's multiple social issues of poverty, drug rehabilitation, if needed, shame, and stigmatization of women with HIV, especially HIV positive mothers. Most women lack HIV education; they need referrals and assistance accessing and continuing health care, unless they have stable health care relationships. Analysis suggests, though the sample is too small to conclude, that issues of class, perhaps more than race/ethnicity and gender, though these are analyzed as interconnected, influence how women are told their results and their subsequent reactions and actions. Our study suggests that there may be little relationship between mandated state policies and counseling and testing practices. Policy sets standards. But how policies are implemented can be dependent on multiple conditions including counselors' training, resources of time, HIV knowledge, social support, knowledge of gender, race/ethnicity and social class, and women's social, cultural, emotional and physical health needs.

Details

Health, Illness, and use of Care: The Impact of Social Factors
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-084-5

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