Search results

1 – 10 of over 1000
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Frances Gordon and Claire Walsh

Modernised health and social care services require that qualifying practitioners have the necessary skills for them to practise collaboratively. The nature of…

Abstract

Modernised health and social care services require that qualifying practitioners have the necessary skills for them to practise collaboratively. The nature of interprofessional working is, however, poorly understood. This article describes the development of learning outcomes regarding interprofessional working that are relevant to all professions.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 April 2021

Melissa Jane Carey and Melissa Taylor

The purpose of this review was to explore the literature for evidence of the impact of interprofessional practice models on health service inequity, particularly within…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this review was to explore the literature for evidence of the impact of interprofessional practice models on health service inequity, particularly within community care settings for diverse ageing populations.

Design/methodology/approach

An integrative systematic literature review was conducted following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) framework combined with the EndNote reference management system. Following the collection and comprehensive screening process completion, a thematic analysis of the included articles occurred utilising within NVivo 12 software.

Findings

The review found that there was a paucity of evidence related to the relationship between interprofessional practice models (IPM) and health service equity for ageing populations. There is a need to improve collaborative practices between social care, public health care and health service providers to more clearly define team member roles. Key aspirations included the need for future innovations in health service delivery to place health service equity as a goal for interprofessional practice. There is a need to find ways to measure and articulate the impact for vulnerable populations and communities.

Research limitations/implications

The review offers insight into the need for health care delivery models to place health service equity at the centre of the model design. In practice settings, this includes setting interprofessional team goals around achieving equitable care outcomes for, and with, vulnerable populations. Implications for practice relate to improving how interprofessional teams work with communities to achieve health care equity.

Originality/value

There is a consensus across the literature that there continues to be health service inequity, yet IPE and interprofessional collaborative practice (IPC) have been growing in momentum for some time. Despite many statements that there is a link between interprofessional practice and improved health service equity and health outcomes, evidence for this is yet to be fully realised. This review highlights the urgent need to review the link between education and practice, and innovative health models of care that enable heath care professionals and social care providers to work together towards achieving health equity for ageing populations. It is clear that more evidence is required to establish evidence for best practice in interprofessional care that has the mitigation of health care inequity as a central objective.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 35 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 15 March 2018

Tony Smith, Sally Fowler-Davis, Susan Nancarrow, Steven Mark Brian Ariss and Pam Enderby

The purpose of this study is to review evidence on the nature of effective leadership in interprofessional health and social care teams.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to review evidence on the nature of effective leadership in interprofessional health and social care teams.

Design/methodology/approach

A critical review and thematic synthesis of research literature conducted using systematic methods to identify and construct a framework to explain the available evidence about leadership in interprofessional health and social care teams.

Findings

Twenty-eight papers were reviewed and contributed to the framework for interprofessional leadership. Twelve themes emerged from the literature, the themes were: facilitate shared leadership; transformation and change; personal qualities; goal alignment; creativity and innovation; communication; team-building; leadership clarity; direction setting; external liaison; skill mix and diversity; clinical and contextual expertise. The discussion includes some comparative analysis with theories and themes in team management and team leadership.

Originality/value

This research identifies some of the characteristics of effective leadership of interprofessional health and social care teams. By capturing and synthesising the literature, it is clear that effective interprofessional health and social care team leadership requires a unique blend of knowledge and skills that support innovation and improvement. Further research is required to deepen the understanding of the degree to which team leadership results in better outcomes for both patients and teams.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 April 2015

Catherine Mangan, Robin Miller and Carol Ward

The purpose of this paper is to report on the findings of the first stage of a project seeking to improve interprofessional working between general practice and adult…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on the findings of the first stage of a project seeking to improve interprofessional working between general practice and adult social care teams. It develops the current evidence base through findings from focus groups and reflects on the implications of the findings for interprofessional collaboration.

Design/methodology/approach

The project involved running seven focus groups with general practice staff and adult social work teams to explore their perceptions and understanding of each other.

Findings

The focus groups highlighted that the negative aspects of interprofessional working outweighed the positives. Negatives included perceptions of different value bases, a lack of knowledge about each others’ roles and responsibilities which resulted in resorting to stereotypes, poor interprofessional communication and a sense of an unspoken professional hierarchy with general practitioners (GPs) at the top leading preventing a culture of appropriate challenge.

Research limitations/implications

The research has only been conducted with four GP practices and three social work teams that had expressed an interest in improving their interprofessional working. Therefore the findings may not be generalisable.

Practical implications

The case study suggests that there is a lack of effective interprofessional working between social care teams and general practice. With the current health and social care agenda focused on integration, this suggests there should be a greater focus on this area.

Originality/value

This paper illustrates that despite many years of policy makers promoting better integration, the quality of the interprofessional collaboration between social care teams and general practice remains poor.

Article
Publication date: 18 November 2013

Monica Nandan and Manuel London

The purpose of this paper is to provide a rationale for developing interprofessional competencies among graduates from professional and graduate programs, so that they are…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a rationale for developing interprofessional competencies among graduates from professional and graduate programs, so that they are well prepared to participate in local, national and global social change strategies.

Design/methodology/approach

After reviewing the literature on strategic social change initiatives the authors briefly describe two such initiatives: corporate social responsibility initiatives and social entrepreneurial ventures. After reviewing the interprofessional literature from various disciplines and professions, the authors categorized them into “competencies,” “rationale,” “conceptual framework,” “principles” and “challenges.” An examination of exemplar pedagogy from this body of literature suggests ways to prepare students to lead and actively participate in innovative, collaborative social change initiatives.

Findings

Interdisciplinary competencies include teamwork, communication, contextual understanding, negotiation, critical thinking, leadership, openness and adaptability. Interprofessional educational models are difficult to implement, however, ethical responsibility of educators to prepare students for complex realities trumps the challenges.

Practical implications

Interprofessional educational experiences can enable students to engage in generative and transformational learning which can later facilitate in creation of innovative solutions for society's recalcitrant physical, social and environmental issues.

Originality/value

Based on the system's perspective, the paper provides guidelines and strategies for implementing interprofessional pedagogical initiative.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 55 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 January 2020

Christian Beech and Fiona Verity

The purpose of this paper is to explore interprofessional and multidisciplinary working between health and social care practitioners providing services to older people…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore interprofessional and multidisciplinary working between health and social care practitioners providing services to older people through the prism of how risk is assessed and managed. It proposes that whilst interprofessional and multidisciplinary working is a broad and commonly researched topic, there is a relative paucity of evidence specifically regarding how health and social care practitioners work together across structural, cultural and ideological divides. The study aims to expand the domain of integrated health and social care by including perceptions, understanding and use of the concept of risk by professionals from different disciplines.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based upon an exploratory study using an interpretivist phenomenological perspective, including 23 semi-structured individual interviews with health and social care practitioners and 2 non-participant observations of multidisciplinary team meetings.

Findings

The paper provides empirical insights around the complex dynamics of interprofessional and multidisciplinary working between health and social care practitioners, in particular the saliency of the interconnectedness of individual practitioner Personalities with the Process of interprofessional and multidisciplinary working under the auspices of relevant Policy drivers.

Research limitations/implications

The research was conducted in Wales and, due to the increasingly divergent policy context within the UK, the research results may lack generalisability from a wider UK or international perspective. Therefore, researchers are encouraged to test the propositions of this research further.

Practical implications

The paper includes implications for both interprofessional and multidisciplinary policy and practice with older people. With new models of integrated care being sought, the findings of this study may offer a timely and valuable contribution, particularly from the inclusion of a social care perspective and in better understanding the interconnectedness of practitioner personalities with process and policy.

Originality/value

This paper fulfils an identified need to study the complex dynamics and interconnectedness between health and social care practitioners who work together to provide services to older people.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Frances Gordon and Katie Ward

This article discusses the practice‐based teaching strategies required to assist students to develop interprofessional working capability. A role‐play session is presented…

Abstract

This article discusses the practice‐based teaching strategies required to assist students to develop interprofessional working capability. A role‐play session is presented as an exemplar, but the teaching strategies described can be equally employed in facilitating reflections on practice in real‐life multiprofessional teams.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 13 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 5 November 2021

Kevin Real, Leanna Hartsough and Lisa C. Huddleston

This chapter examines group communication in medical teams through psychological safety and simulation training research. Research has shown that medical teams are…

Abstract

This chapter examines group communication in medical teams through psychological safety and simulation training research. Research has shown that medical teams are challenged by established hierarchies, power/status differences, temporal stability, changing team memberships, and deeply held beliefs that emphasize individual responsibility. A review of 47 studies (29 psychological safety, 18 simulation) was conducted to understand key findings in relationship to group communication. Results indicate that team leadership promotes team psychological safety, voice, and relationship quality while status differences and hierarchy continue to affect psychological safety within medical teams. Simulation training facilitated interprofessional relationships, attitudes toward teamwork, self-efficacy, and group communication. The findings of this review suggest that psychological safety may be developed through simulation training. The quality of patient care is improved when all members of medical teams have the ability and motivation to communicate effectively.

Details

The Emerald Handbook of Group and Team Communication Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-501-8

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 March 2015

Elizabeth McCay, Kristin Cleverley, Audrey Danaher and Naomi Mudachi

The purpose of this paper is to describe a partnership, the Ryerson-Centre for Addiction and Mental Health Collaborative for Client-Centred and Family Sensitive Care…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe a partnership, the Ryerson-Centre for Addiction and Mental Health Collaborative for Client-Centred and Family Sensitive Care Collaborative, between an urban university and tertiary care mental health facility to build capacity in using research evidence to support client-centred care. A cornerstone of the partnership was a study exploring the connection between effective interprofessional collaboration and the capacity to provide exemplary client-centred care in mental health.

Design/methodology/approach

The Collaborative brings together organizations with shared values and a commitment to client-centred interprofessional care. It is a strategic approach in amplifying opportunities for the uptake of research evidence and knowledge transfer. One of the principal deliverables for the Collaborative was a multi-phased study exploring the relationship between team collaboration and client-centred care.

Findings

Research findings identified a significant association between the level of team effectiveness and collaboration and the staffs’ perceived capacity to deliver client-centred care. Client and family member perspectives highlighted the importance of interprofessional team functioning and collaboration. The work of the Collaborative helped narrow the knowledge practice gap through: a research practicum to mentor graduate students; knowledge exchange and dissemination; and working with advanced practice staff to support change within the organization.

Originality/value

Inter-organizational relationships, such as the Collaborative, support initiatives that accelerate the use of clinically relevant research and bridge the knowledge practice gap. A university/tertiary care teaching facility partnership represents a promising model for advancing and disseminating evidenced-based knowledge.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 December 2020

Iyad Ibrahim Shaqura, Radwan Baroud and Ali Akbari Sari

This study aimed at assessing the current interprofessional collaboration (IPC) among healthcare professionals at the public hospitals in the Gaza Strip in 2016 through…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aimed at assessing the current interprofessional collaboration (IPC) among healthcare professionals at the public hospitals in the Gaza Strip in 2016 through measuring the average level, and also examind the influence of professionals' characteristics on their collaboration.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative, cross-sectional study using a valid and reliable self-administered questionnaire on a 5-point Likert scale was conducted. A total of 323 participants from six health professions completed the questionnaire which was analyzed using SPSS version 20 by applying descriptive tests, t-test, ANOVA and inferential analysis (Scheffe test); the statistical significance was considered at p = 0.05.

Findings

The interprofessional collaboration was moderate (71.66%). “General relationships” elicited the highest mean score (3.943) due to participants' belief in its importance, whereas “community linkages and coordination of care” was the lowest (3.181) as a result of the restricted policy in this regard. Gender, age, profession and position have shown statistically significant variables on the overall collaboration. In short, there are differences in the performance of IPC domains and even within items of the same domain.

Research limitations/implications

This study was conducted at only public hospitals; in addition, it was a cross-sectional study, so the causation relationships are difficult to assess. Moreover, the questionnaire was on self-administered basis which might result in misread or misunderstood bias.

Originality/value

This was the first study in the Palestinian context on collaboration between multiple professions using a comprehensive and reliable assessment tool.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Keywords

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