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Article
Publication date: 11 March 2021

Prantika Ray and Sunil Kumar Maheshwari

The paper tries to understand the needs of the international assignees across the different stages of expatriation and how different developers in the professional and…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper tries to understand the needs of the international assignees across the different stages of expatriation and how different developers in the professional and non-professional sphere render support and advice through these stages.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, the authors have interviewed 20 expatriates of various nationalities and tried to understand the various needs of the expatriates across the three initial stages of an assignment.

Findings

The paper finds that four important mentors in an expatriation assignment play multiple need-based mentoring functions at various assignment stages: host country nationals (HCNs), parent country nationals, fellow expatriates and family.

Research limitations/implications

This paper contributes to the literature on the need-based support rendered to expatriates during an international assignment. The paper, however, does not incorporate the perceptions of other vital stakeholders in the network and their intentions to contribute to the developmental network.

Practical implications

This paper lays down important practical implications for expatriates and the human resource management (HRM) professionals. This paper urges the practitioners to take a nuanced approach for developing expatriates than a generalized mentoring programme.

Originality/value

This study highlights the changing needs of the international assignees across the stages of an international assignment and demonstrates the important intra-organizational and extra-organizational developers such as family members in the fulfilment of these needs.

Details

Journal of Global Mobility: The Home of Expatriate Management Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-8799

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 28 August 2020

Deborah J. Morris, Elanor Lucy Webb, Emma Parmar, Grace Trundle and Anne McLean

People with developmental disorders are significantly more likely to experience adverse childhood experiences (ACEs), although the impact of ACEs on this population is not…

Abstract

Purpose

People with developmental disorders are significantly more likely to experience adverse childhood experiences (ACEs), although the impact of ACEs on this population is not well understood. Furthermore, considerably less is known about the exposure to, and impact of, ACEs in detained adolescents with complex developmental disorder needs. This paper aims to explore the exposure to ACEs in an adolescent population detained in a secure specialist developmental disorder service.

Design/methodology/approach

A retrospective file review was used to explore ACEs and placement histories within a specialist developmental disorder inpatient service. Data was collated for a convenience sample of 36 adolescents, 9 of whom were female, aged 13–20 years (M = 17.28 years).

Findings

A total of 33 participants (91.7%) had experienced at least 1 ACE, with 58% experiencing 4 or more ACEs and 36% experiencing 6 or more ACEs. The most common ACEs reported were physical abuse (61.6%), parental separation (58.3%) and emotional abuse (55.6%). The majority of participants had also experienced high levels of disruption prior to admission, with an average of four placement breakdowns (range 1–13, standard deviation = 3.1). ACEs held a significant positive association with the total number of placement breakdowns and total number of mental health diagnoses.

Practical implications

Adolescents detained in specialist developmental disorder secure care had, at the point of admission, experienced high levels of adversities and had been exposed to high levels of experienced and observed abuse. The level of exposure to adversity and ongoing disruptions in care suggests that Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services’ developmental secure services should consider adopting dual treatment frameworks of developmental disorder and trauma-informed care.

Originality/value

This study explored the early-life and placement experiences of a marginalised and understudied population.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 14 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

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Article
Publication date: 10 February 2020

Dae Seok Chai, Shinhee Jeong and Baek-Kyoo Joo

The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of developmental opportunities and perceived pay equity-and paternalistic leadership on affective organizational…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of developmental opportunities and perceived pay equity-and paternalistic leadership on affective organizational commitment and the moderating role of paternalistic leadership at the team level in a Korean context.

Design/methodology/approach

Hierarchical linear modeling with a two-level design was used to analyze data collected from 844 employees and 59 work teams.

Findings

The study identified that developmental opportunities and perceived pay equity were significantly associated with affective organizational commitment. However, paternalistic leadership was not significantly related to affective organizational commitment. The results also showed that the moderation effect of paternalistic leadership on the relationship between pay equity and organizational commitment was non-significant, and paternalistic leadership moderated the relationship between developmental opportunities and organizational commitment. In particular, the relationship of developmental opportunities with organizational commitment became weaker when the supervisor’s paternalistic leadership was stronger.

Research limitations/implications

The results of this study supported the applicability of organizational support theory and previous empirical studies supporting the relationships between human resource (HR) practices and commitment, particularly in the Korean cultural context. The results have several practical implications for employers, mangers and HR practitioners in an East Asian cultural context.

Originality/value

This study extends the body of knowledge in leadership research by investigating the influences of two key factors of HR practices and a Confucianism-based indigenous leadership theory on organizational commitment. More importantly, the results can guide future cross-national or cross-organizational studies exploring the relationships among leadership, organizational culture and organizational effectiveness. This study also offers clearer empirical evidence for why and how developmental opportunities and perceived pay equity need to be enhanced in an East Asian cultural context.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 44 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 25 February 2021

Elizabeth Solberg, Linda Lai and Anders Dysvik

Intrinsic motivation is held as critical for employees' willingness to be flexible (WTBF). Yet empirical research suggests that employees who find work intrinsically…

Abstract

Purpose

Intrinsic motivation is held as critical for employees' willingness to be flexible (WTBF). Yet empirical research suggests that employees who find work intrinsically satisfying could resist work changes. In this study, the authors examine if a curvilinear relationship exists between these variables.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors predict that the relationship between intrinsic motivation and employees' WTBF will become more positive as intrinsic motivation advances beyond moderate levels. They examine the role developmental supervisor support plays in generating the critical threshold of intrinsic motivation needed for it to be positively related with WTBF. They test their hypotheses with survey data collected in three substantially different employee samples.

Findings

Data support the hypothesized curvilinear relationship between intrinsic motivation and WTBF. Developmental supervisor support is found to influence employee flexibility indirectly through its linear effect on intrinsic motivation and, in turn, the quadratic effect of intrinsic motivation on WTBF.

Practical implications

The study provides insight into how and when intrinsic motivation increases employees' WTBF and into the degree of developmental support needed to facilitate a positive relationship between these variables.

Originality/value

This is the first study to the author’s knowledge that empirically examines the relationship between intrinsic motivation and employees' WTBF.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 25 January 2021

Christine Cocker, Adi Cooper, Dez Holmes and Fiona Bateman

The purpose of this paper is to set out the similarities and differences between the legal frameworks for safeguarding children and adults. It presents the case for…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to set out the similarities and differences between the legal frameworks for safeguarding children and adults. It presents the case for developing a Transitional Safeguarding approach to create an integrated paradigm for safeguarding young people that better meets their developmental needs and better reflects the nature of harms young people face.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper draws on the key principles of the Children Act 1989 and the Care Act 2014 and discusses their similarities and differences. It then introduces two approaches to safeguarding: Making Safeguarding Personal (MSP); and transitional safeguarding; that can inform safeguarding work with young people. Other legal frameworks that influence safeguarding practices, such as the Mental Capacity Act 2005 and the Human Rights Act 1998, are also discussed.

Findings

Safeguarding practice still operates within a child/adult binary; neither safeguarding system adequately meets the needs of young people. Transitional Safeguarding advocates an approach to working with young people that is relational, developmental and contextual. MSP focuses on the wishes of the person at risk from abuse or neglect and their desired outcomes. This is also central to a Transitional Safeguarding approach, which is participative, evidence informed and promotes equalities, diversity and inclusion.

Practical implications

Building a case for developing MSP for young people means that local partnerships could create the type of service that best meets local needs, whilst ensuring their services are participative and responsive to the specific safeguarding needs of individual young people.

Originality/value

This paper promotes applying the principles of MSP to safeguarding practice with young people. It argues that the differences between the children and adult legislative frameworks are not so great that they would inhibit this approach to safeguarding young people.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1995

Lynne McClure and William B. Werther

Specific types of dysfunctional work behaviours form anidentifiable pattern that can be uncovered through a needs analysis andaddressed by a multi‐dimensional, five‐step…

Abstract

Specific types of dysfunctional work behaviours form an identifiable pattern that can be uncovered through a needs analysis and addressed by a multi‐dimensional, five‐step developmental effort. Includes a framework for these behaviours, an outline development intervention, a case study and recommendations for further action.

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1998

Jay Klagge

The need to develop new skills among middle managers has been increasing since the early 1990s. This need arises from the changes in the workplace environment associated…

Abstract

The need to develop new skills among middle managers has been increasing since the early 1990s. This need arises from the changes in the workplace environment associated with the realities of downsizing, the quality movement, and the increased use of teams. This article reports on the experience of one downsized, quality‐conscious, team‐based organization in identifying the development needs of its middle managers. The process used by the case study organization to identify the development needs among its middle managers is outlined. This process can be seen as an example of how development needs can be identified. The findings from the identification process within the case study organization present an initial list of development needs among today’s middle managers. Recommendations on training courses for middle management development are proposed. These recommendations provide initial guidance to organizations interested in developing their middle management assets.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 17 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 21 December 2015

Celia Beckett, Richard Cross, Jaqui Hewitt-Taylor and Pam McConnell

– The purpose of this paper is to describe the development process of building an assessment model to assess the emotional and behavioural needs of “looked after children”.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the development process of building an assessment model to assess the emotional and behavioural needs of “looked after children”.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is a technical paper developing and evaluating a process for comprehensively assessing children ' s needs using a combination of three existing tools.

Findings

The paper identifies a model to assess “looked after” children and highlights some of the early benefits and challenges which have been encountered using this model.

Practical implications

This paper suggests a model and timeframe to ensure that detailed assessments of the mental health of “looked after” children are effectively carried out.

Social implications

There is a potential for an improvement in assessment of looked after children that will lead to the identification of appropriate interventions and services.

Originality/value

The paper is new in identifying a combination of assessment measures and a timeline to complete these.

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2003

Donald E. Gibson and Lisa A. Barron

The international trend toward organizations emphasizing adaptability and change throughout careers suggests that research should examine the development of employees into…

Abstract

The international trend toward organizations emphasizing adaptability and change throughout careers suggests that research should examine the development of employees into later career stages. Role models have been seen as critical to individuals’ skill and identity development, but have only been regarded as salient in early career stages and to younger individuals. In this study, we argue that older employees’ commitment to and satisfaction in their organization will be associated with their perception of available role models. As predicted, the study finds that older employees tended to identify multiple role models in their organization. Moreover, the study finds that the degree to which older employees perceive that they have role models available and perceive that these role models share similar attitudes, values, and goals is associated with commitment and satisfaction. Implications of these findings for career researchers and for managers are discussed.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2015

Shadi Ebrahimi Mehrabani and Noor Azmi Mohamad

The purpose of this paper is to develop a leadership skills development model and measure, based on its effect on organizational effectiveness and moderator effect of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a leadership skills development model and measure, based on its effect on organizational effectiveness and moderator effect of knowledge sharing.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the survey method, this paper investigates the validation of measures and model of the study. It tests the reliability and constructs validity of a leadership skills development measurement scale, created on the basis of the existing measures of leadership, organizational effectiveness and knowledge sharing. This scale is harmonized with transformational, transactional and servant leadership theories.

Findings

A structural model and measure of leadership skills development is proposed.

Research limitations/implications

This study is limited by its particular population; therefore, future research need to be done to illustrate whether the current results can be generalized with other samples from different situations and cultures.

Originality/value

The paper provides an in depth review of leadership development, as well as developing a theory-based model and a valid and reliable questionnaire, which measures leadership skills development, effectiveness and knowledge sharing. The study results could improve the future empirical leadership development research.

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