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Article
Publication date: 7 June 2021

Nicola Gregson and Claire Delaney

The purpose of this paper is to present a case study using a systemic team formulation approach, in the context of supporting a women with intellectual disabilities with a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a case study using a systemic team formulation approach, in the context of supporting a women with intellectual disabilities with a history of trauma.

Design/methodology/approach

A reflective stance is used to describe the process of assessment, hypothesising, formulation and intervention in a single case study design.

Findings

Feedback from care staff suggests that they found a team formulation approach helpful to improve their understanding of the service user they support.

Practical implications

The paper discusses how systemic team formulation can draw on trauma-informed care principles in the context of supporting an individual with an intellectual disability. Future research should aim to replicate the approach for findings to be applied more broadly. COVID-19 has meant clinical working has had to be adapted, clinicians should carefully consider how collaborative and meaningful work can continue to be facilitated within the current parameters.

Originality/value

This case study contributes to the literature in the use of systemic team formulation interventions within an intellectual disability context, drawing on trauma-informed care principles and reflecting on adapted working within the COVID-19 pandemic.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 15 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 28 April 2022

Daryl Mahon and Martha Griffin

In the previous chapters, I set out a conceptual model of trauma-informed servant leadership and discussed servant leadership supervision for working with burnout

Abstract

In the previous chapters, I set out a conceptual model of trauma-informed servant leadership and discussed servant leadership supervision for working with burnout, compassion fatigue and secondary trauma in employees within trauma related health and social care settings. In this chapter, I further extend servant leadership to the peer support principle in trauma-informed approaches (Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 2014). The first part of this chapter will examine peer support work (PSW) and report on the outcomes associated with it. Then, servant leadership will be discussed and used to operationalise the principle of peer support as set out in trauma-informed approaches. A servant leadership peer support approach is put forward with a theoretical basis. This theoretical model has been slightly changed from the previous servant leadership approaches discussed, in order to represent the PSW role more accurately. However, as discussed previously, it is not the characteristics of the Servant leadership (SL) model that define the approach, rather the philosophy and desire to serve first. In the last section of this chapter, Martha Griffin brings the characteristics of this model to life using her vast experience and discusses some of the potential challenges faced by peers in training and practice.

Details

Trauma-Responsive Organisations: The Trauma Ecology Model
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80382-429-1

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 28 April 2022

Daryl Mahon

Abstract

Details

Trauma-Responsive Organisations: The Trauma Ecology Model
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80382-429-1

Article
Publication date: 22 July 2021

Daryl Mahon

Practitioners, organisations and policy makers in health and social care settings are increasingly recognising the need for trauma-informed approaches in organisational…

Abstract

Purpose

Practitioners, organisations and policy makers in health and social care settings are increasingly recognising the need for trauma-informed approaches in organisational settings, with morbidity and financial burdens a growing concern over the past few years. Servant leadership has a unique focus on emotional healing, service to others as the first priority, in addition to the growth, well-being and personal and professional development of key stakeholders. This paper aims to discuss Trauma Informed Servant Leadership (TISL).

Design/methodology/approach

A targeted review of the servant leadership and trauma-informed care literature was conducted. Relevant studies, including systematic review and meta-analysis, were sourced, with the resulting interpretation informing the conceptual model.

Findings

Although there are general guidelines regarding how to go about instituting trauma-informed approaches, with calls for organisational leadership to adapt the often cited six trauma-informed principles, to date there has not been a leadership approach elucidated which takes as its starting point and core feature to be trauma informed. At the same time, there is a paucity of research elucidating trauma outcomes for service users or employees in the literature when a trauma-informed approach is used. However, there is a large body of evidence indicating that servant leadership has many of the outcomes at the employee level that trauma-informed approaches are attempting to attain. Thus, the author builds on a previous conceptual paper in which a model of servant leadership and servant leadership supervision are proposed to mitigate against compassion fatigue and secondary trauma in the health and social care sector. The author extends that research to this paper by recasting servant leadership as a trauma-informed model of leadership that naturally operationalises trauma-informed principles.

Research limitations/implications

A lack of primary data limits the extent to which conclusions can be drawn on the effectiveness of this conceptual model. However, the model is based on robust research across the differential components used; therefore, it can act as a framework for future empirical research designs to be studies at the organisational level. Both the servant leadership and trauma-informed literatures have been extended with the addition of this model.

Practical implications

TISL can complement the trauma-informed approach and may also be viable as an alternative to trauma-informed approaches. This paper offers guidelines to practitioners and organisations in health and social care on how to operationalise important trauma-informed principles through leadership.

Social implications

This conceptual model may help reduce the burden of trauma and re-traumatisation encountered by practitioners and service users in health and social care settings, impacting on morbidity.

Originality/value

To the best of the author’s knowledge, this is a novel approach, the first of its kind.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 28 April 2022

Daryl Mahon

In this chapter, an overview of the trauma-informed approach is described. The background and context to trauma, its impact on the person, and organisational responses are

Abstract

In this chapter, an overview of the trauma-informed approach is described. The background and context to trauma, its impact on the person, and organisational responses are considered. More specifically, I distinguish between trauma specific and non-specific organisations by defining the characteristic of each. This chapter sets the tone for the remainder of the book by introducing a conceptual model for both specific and non-specific trauma organisations. In order to do this, I outline the differential components that are deemed necessary for organisations to be trauma-responsive; in doing so, I introduce the Trauma Ecology Model to the literature, outlining its various components.

Details

Trauma-Responsive Organisations: The Trauma Ecology Model
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80382-429-1

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 September 2021

Dalia Chowdhury

Workforce development in rural communities to address a surge in opioid addiction and overdose related hospitalizations has been an unaddressed issue in the USA. This…

Abstract

Purpose

Workforce development in rural communities to address a surge in opioid addiction and overdose related hospitalizations has been an unaddressed issue in the USA. This study aims to present an integrated, trauma-informed, behavioral workforce development initiative in a midwestern rural setting in the USA.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a mixed method, two-phased study: the first phase tracked and analyzed two focus group conferences involving experts (n = 6) and professionals (n = 8) to develop a training protocol; the second phase provided a training (n = 101), based on the protocol to future professionals and compared competencies before and after the implementation of the training.

Findings

There is a need of a trauma integrated approach in providing interprofessional training connecting health-care workers in rural communities to address the current opioid crisis to bring about cohesion among integrated and interdisciplinary teams. Workforce building will need to implement best practices not only among medical providers but among community mental health practitioners in rural areas.

Originality/value

This is a unique trauma-informed workforce development initiative in a rural community. Such studies are extremely limited and almost non-existent. Further initiatives need to be taken in this field to identify unique differences within communities that may hinder implementation.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Therapeutic Communities: The International Journal of Therapeutic Communities, vol. 34 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-1866

Article
Publication date: 7 May 2021

Sue Holttum

This paper aims to highlight emerging research relating to the need to recognise and address trauma in mental health service users.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to highlight emerging research relating to the need to recognise and address trauma in mental health service users.

Design/methodology/approach

The author searched for papers on trauma-informed care, published in the past two years.

Findings

One paper reports ideas of service users and family members for trauma-informed mental health services. A second paper describes an online survey seeking agreement between staff and service users of early intervention services for psychosis about practices of trauma-informed care. Both papers feature themes about safety and staff having training and support for asking about and responding to trauma. A third paper reports on specific therapies for trauma with people who experience psychosis. It found some evidence for talking therapies but noted that people with a psychosis diagnosis are rarely offered such therapies.

Originality/value

These papers highlight an emerging consensus about essential components of trauma-informed care and the need for staff training and support to realise it. The exclusion of people with a psychosis diagnosis from specific trauma therapies might begin to be addressed if services were more able to recognise trauma. There is some evidence that talking therapies for childhood trauma can be helpful for people who have a psychosis diagnosis. However, evidence reviews should be broadened to include a range of distressing experiences recognised to follow childhood trauma irrespective of whether the person has a psychosis diagnosis.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 28 April 2022

Daryl Mahon

In the previous chapter, I introduced trauma-informed care as an approach to organisational change and a shift in culture to recognise that many employees and people

Abstract

In the previous chapter, I introduced trauma-informed care as an approach to organisational change and a shift in culture to recognise that many employees and people attending services have past trauma experiences. In this chapter, I recast servant leadership (SL) as a trauma-informed leadership model that naturally operationalises some of the principles discussed in the TIA literature. The first section of this chapter addresses the societal need for a more ethical and moral leadership approach, before briefly outlining the prevalence of trauma experienced by service users and employees. The next section provides an overview and definition of SL in a general sense, before articulating a trauma-informed model of SL and its characteristics. Finally, some of the outcomes associated with SL are discussed with a key focus on how this approach operationalises the principle of psychological safety, trust and empowerment found in trauma-informed approaches, as they relate to employees.

Details

Trauma-Responsive Organisations: The Trauma Ecology Model
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80382-429-1

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 28 April 2022

Michael Norton

Mental health services have changed significantly in the past few decades. Currently, our services are transforming from one that was biomedically led to one that

Abstract

Mental health services have changed significantly in the past few decades. Currently, our services are transforming from one that was biomedically led to one that encompasses a recovery orientation. Additionally, a new field of study as it related to mental health care is emerging that of trauma-informed care. In this chapter, we explore briefly what we mean by the terms trauma and trauma-informed care. This is followed by a critical examination of how co-production and servant leadership can work together to support individuals through their trauma towards recovery and well-being. From which, we suggest that peer support workers are suitable candidates to co-produce trauma-informed services as they embody the connecting principles of choice and empowerment needed for all three concepts to converge and work together to enhance recovery and well-being. While I focus on using co-production in the mental health space in this chapter, the principles and practices can equally apply to other health and social care services.

Details

Trauma-Responsive Organisations: The Trauma Ecology Model
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80382-429-1

Keywords

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