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Article
Publication date: 18 March 2020

Aneeshta Gunness and Harmen Oppewal

Effects of stockouts on purchase decisions have been examined from a variety of perspectives; little is yet known about how consumers react to stockouts in online shopping…

Abstract

Purpose

Effects of stockouts on purchase decisions have been examined from a variety of perspectives; little is yet known about how consumers react to stockouts in online shopping contexts. The present study investigates how stockout reactions depend on a consumer's mindset and familiarity with a website and investigates the role of negative affect in determining a consumer's stockout reaction.

Design/methodology/approach

Shopping mindsets (deliberative vs. implemental) and website familiarity (high vs. low) were manipulated in an online experiment consisting of a simulated shopping task at an existing website which next was presented as having a stockout. The study observed the participants' switching responses and measured their negative affect.

Findings

Findings indicate that when encountering an online stockout, consumers in an implemental mindset are more likely to switch away from the website than those in a deliberative mindset and are more likely to search for additional items at a competing site. Consumers who are more familiar with the website where they encounter the stockout display a higher likelihood of defecting to a competing site; however, when they are in an implemental mindset, their inclination to defect decreases. The study also shows that the strength of negative emotions affects OOS responses in that buyers that experience more negative emotions are more likely to defect from the site.

Practical implications

The study's findings provide suggestions as to how retailers can manage and minimize defection behaviours associated with online stockouts. In designing operational and marketing strategies retailers need to pay close attention to how consumers' individual mindsets may vary by trait or circumstance and how they hence may respond differently to stockouts.

Originality/value

The authors introduce a novel perspective to the literature on stockout induced reactions and contribute by furthering investigation into previously unexplored specific consumer characteristics and intricacies of stockouts that drive particular stockout reactions.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 48 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 25 November 2019

Juyoung Kim, Hong Im Shin and Hyung Tak Lee

Existing studies of shopping momentum effect show that an initial purchase causes the consumer to switch from a deliberative mindset to an implemental mindset, thereby…

Abstract

Purpose

Existing studies of shopping momentum effect show that an initial purchase causes the consumer to switch from a deliberative mindset to an implemental mindset, thereby leading to buy subsequent items based on Gollwitzer’s Rubicon model. Since purchase activity goes through the actional phase which has not been studied yet, the purpose of this paper is to explore the characteristics of the actional mindset compared with those of the planning and deliberative mindsets.

Design/methodology/approach

This study conducts three experiments to examine whether the implemental mindset can be differentiated from the actional mindset via recalls and perceptual processing measures.

Findings

The findings provide evidences that the actional mindset is different from the implemental mindset, and the planning phase is associated more with broad-mindedness, whereas the actional phase is with narrow-mindedness.

Research limitations/implications

Manipulation of the actional mindset can be extended to real purchases in physical shopping spaces, and various choice objects could be tested with a larger number of participants.

Practical implications

To boost the shopping momentum effect, marketers should put customers into an actional mindset by leading them to show their decisions such as carrying a shopping bag and uploading their purchased items. To avoid overbuying, customers should stay in planning mindsets without verbalizing their decisions. Putting goods into virtual shopping baskets in online shopping could be a good way to avoid overbuying.

Originality/value

The paper empirically explores the characteristics of actional mindset in terms of cognitive and perceptual processing and suggest meaningful implication in online shopping situation.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 32 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2016

Robert P. French II

The purpose of this paper is to explore conceptualizations of mindset across disciplines with particular attention to scholars’ care in defining and operationalizing the…

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1535

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore conceptualizations of mindset across disciplines with particular attention to scholars’ care in defining and operationalizing the construct of mindset. Theories of mindset have witnessed increased attention through a variety of disciplines for their applicability as processes with the potential to influence individual and/or organizational outcomes. Exploration of mindset conceptualizations and characterizations reveal substantial divergences.

Design/methodology/approach

This conceptual paper generally examines the utilization of mindset constructs via a multidisciplinary review of literature and specifically details three mindset theories (implemental and deliberative, global and growth and fixed mindsets) to illuminate such disparities.

Findings

This paper categorizes the significant variations of the mindset construct and research via three distinct streams. Each stream highlights knowledge as instrumental in the mindset construct; however, the ways in which varying aspects of knowledge, knowledge mechanisms or knowledge as a component of an individuals and/or organization’s identity correspond to the inherent presuppositions of varying articulations of mindset theory and praxis.

Practical implications

Effectively influencing an individual and/or organization’s mindset necessitates an accurate assessment of the mindset construct. Further, evaluating the applicability of mindset research and/or feedback from a consultant warrants attention to the assumptions undergirding the mindset construct.

Originality/value

Generally, mindset studies and theories have scantly attended to both the historical development of mindset research as well as divergences in the research record within and across disciplines. This paper attempts to address this deficiency. Further, this paper appears to be the first attempt to compare and identify varying conceptualizations and characterizations of mindset theory and, therefore, identifies previously unidentified assumptions.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 30 November 2020

Antonio Daood, Cinzia Calluso and Luca Giustiniano

Decision-making has long been recognized as being at the core of organizational life. Yet, the cognitive mechanisms by which managers make decisions represent a critical…

Abstract

Decision-making has long been recognized as being at the core of organizational life. Yet, the cognitive mechanisms by which managers make decisions represent a critical field of exploration. In this context, business models (BMs) are cognitive representations of organizational architectures that managers use to orient their firms in the business environment. While BMs – as managerial schemas – have been extensively studied for their beneficial applications at the strategic level, scholarly attention has rarely focused on their dark side. In this chapter, we point out that BM thinking – that focuses excessively on established schemas – might narrow managerial cognition in the process of fine-tuning the current BM; in the process, opportunities for more radical BM innovation can be overlooked. We systematize March and Simon’s contribution on managerial cognition into a more comprehensive conceptual framework by integrating the perspectives of Kahneman, Baron, and Gollwitzer. The result is an epistemologically coherent framework for managerial cognition and decision-making that focuses on how managers can overcome cognitive biases that derive from a reliance on established BMs as schemas. We close this chapter with directions for further research.

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Davide Di Fatta and Maurice Yolles

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the personal identity of Donald Trump in the US presidential election using the mindset agency theory framework and content analysis.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the personal identity of Donald Trump in the US presidential election using the mindset agency theory framework and content analysis.

Design/methodology/approach

The qualitative evaluation of identity type is determined by the personality mindset agency theory (PMAT). This measures qualitatively by assigning a type to the personal identity. The methods being adopted are content analysis, and a coding frame is constructed that arises from the key words defined in PMAT.

Findings

Using PMAT, the authors determine that Trump’s personal identity is of the type hierarchical popularism (HP), from which behavioural patterns are derived, supposing that this is consistent with his public identity type measured using agency MAT (AMAT), which will be assessed in part 3 of this paper.

Originality/value

Appropriate image management can be used in an attempt to hide problematic purely self-interest aspects of a personality. This paper shows that it is possible to evaluate personality mindsets using content analysis. In a later paper, exploration of agency mindsets will occur that is indicative of the potential for behaviour.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 46 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 9 May 2012

James Lloyd Bierstaker, James E. Hunton and Jay C. Thibodeau

The current study examines the effect of fraud training on auditors' ability to identify fraud risk factors. This is important because most auditors have little or no…

Abstract

The current study examines the effect of fraud training on auditors' ability to identify fraud risk factors. This is important because most auditors have little or no direct experience with fraud; thus, research that investigates the potential effect of indirect experience through training is vitally important to fraud detection and audit quality. A total of 369 experienced auditors completed a complex audit simulation task that involved 15 seeded fraud risk red flags. A total of 143 auditors participated in a 30-minute training session focused specifically on fraud risk, while the remaining 226 auditors learned about general internal control risk during this time block. The results indicate that auditors with fraud training identified significantly more red flags and obtained greater knowledge about fraud risk than auditors who did not receive the training. Considering that the fraud training consumed only 30 minutes out of a 64-hour training session, the findings suggest that even modest exposure to fraud training is quite effective.

Details

Advances in Accounting Behavioral Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-758-1

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Article
Publication date: 25 July 2019

Eugene Cheng-Xi Aw

The purpose of this paper is to propose and empirically test a model encompassing antecedents of webrooming, an emerging shopping behaviour in omnichannel retailing. This…

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1948

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose and empirically test a model encompassing antecedents of webrooming, an emerging shopping behaviour in omnichannel retailing. This study delineates the impacts of shopping motivation, perceived channel-related benefits and costs on webrooming intention.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire-based survey was conducted using a purposive sampling technique. A total of 300 responses were collected, and data were analysed using Partial Least Square Structural Equation Modelling.

Findings

Shopping motivation, such as efficiency shopping and bargain hunting, negatively influenced webrooming intention. Immediate possession positively influenced webrooming intention. With regard to perceived costs of webrooming, purchase effort and expected price loss negatively influenced webrooming intention. An additional exploratory analysis uncovered the moderating role of efficiency shopping.

Originality/value

This study provides empirical evidence for the antecedents of webrooming intention and expands the understanding of this emerging yet largely unexplored cross-channel behaviour.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 47 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 31 August 2021

Peng Luo, Eric W.T. Ngai, Yongli Li and Xin Tian

This study examines the dynamic relationships of visit behavior in the multiple channels [personal computer (PC) and mobile channels] on online store sales performance.

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines the dynamic relationships of visit behavior in the multiple channels [personal computer (PC) and mobile channels] on online store sales performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical data were from an online store for the period between August 14, 2015 and May 15, 2016. The data consisted of consumer visit behavior and online store sales performance. Vector autoregression with an exogenous variables model was adopted to investigate the dynamic relationships.

Findings

The empirical results show significant relationships between visit behavior metrics (number of visitors, average number of visits per visitor and average length of each visit) in the two channels and online store sales performance. The number of visitors through the PC and mobile channels strongly and positively affects online store sales performance both in the short term and in the longer term. Moreover, the number of visitors in the PC channel has the strongest influence on sales performance metrics, followed by the number of visitors and the average number of visits in the mobile channel. The PC channel's visit behavior metrics explain a larger proportion of the sales performance variance than that in the mobile channel.

Originality/value

The previous literature on consumer behavior in multichannel marketing mainly focuses on channel selection or migration, and examines the different factors affecting channel choice behavior. Little is known about the impacts of visit behavior in the multiple channels. This study adopts the heuristic-systematic information processing theory to unveil the impacts of visit behavior metrics in the PC and mobile channels on online store sales performance.

Details

Internet Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Article
Publication date: 3 July 2017

Taejun (David) Lee

The economic downturn and financial meltdown in the changing retirement savings and pension landscape in the US placed individual investors and financial companies at…

Abstract

Purpose

The economic downturn and financial meltdown in the changing retirement savings and pension landscape in the US placed individual investors and financial companies at risk. Recognizing the need for more financial literacy among investors, the US financial services companies for retirement plans and investment options (i.e. the retirement financial services providers (RFSPs)) have stepped up consumer marketing, particularly through creation of corporate websites. Seeing their potential for increasing literacy and aiding consumer financial decisions, a majority of RFSPs are promoting websites and a large number of consumers use them. With this backdrop, the purpose of this paper is to examine the use of these websites and their conformity to existing regulations regarding design and structure.

Design/methodology/approach

The present study used a quantitative content analysis to examine the types of disclosure information presented on the corporate websites of RFSPs during 2013-2015. It also examined the adherence to the Federal Trade Commission’s (FTC) clear and conspicuous standards (CCS) disclosure guidelines over the three-year period. Finally, this study examined the levels of financial literacy activities employed on 164 RFSPs’ websites over the three-year period.

Findings

This study shows that RFSPs are increasingly providing disclosure information for target consumers via their websites. Although problems still exist with the presentation of that material in terms of the FTC’s suggestions for prominence, there have been some improvements in compliance with proximity of disclosures. In addition, just under one-fourth of the RFSPs were providing tactics and features on their websites to potentially aid in the creation and maintenance of critical financial literacy and acumen.

Practical implications

The key point emerging from this analysis is that financial services providers, regulators, advocacy groups, and policymakers should continue to address varying levels of financial literacy activities to promote the deliberation and discussion of the retirement issues and topics across media while facilitating the provision and dissemination of financial information and data in a clear and conspicuous manner.

Originality/value

This is the first study to explore the content of RFSPs’ websites with regard to disclosure information, adherence to FTC CCS disclosure guidelines, and the use of techniques related to various levels of financial literacy from 2013-2015.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 35 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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Article
Publication date: 6 May 2014

Oliver B. Büttner, Arnd Florack and Anja S. Göritz

The present aims to examine whether interindividual differences in consumers’ shopping orientations reflect a stable consumer disposition (i.e. chronic shopping…

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1871

Abstract

Purpose

The present aims to examine whether interindividual differences in consumers’ shopping orientations reflect a stable consumer disposition (i.e. chronic shopping orientation; CSO). Furthermore, it examines whether this disposition influences consumers’ evaluations of retailer communication. Consumers may shop under an experiential or a task-focused shopping orientation.

Design/methodology/approach

This research builds on four studies; three were conducted online and one was conducted in the laboratory. Study 1 applied a longitudinal design, Studies 2 and 3 applied a cross-sectional design and Study 4 applied an experimental design.

Findings

Study 1 shows that CSO is stable over time. Study 2 finds that interindividual differences in CSO are stable across different retail domains. Studies 3 and 4 demonstrate that experiential shoppers prefer stimulation-oriented claims, whereas task-focused shoppers prefer efficiency-oriented claims.

Originality/value

The value of shopping orientation for customer segmentation and tailored marketing largely depends on whether interindividual differences in CSO are stable. The present research is the first to demonstrate that CSO, indeed, exists as a stable consumer disposition. In addition, the research demonstrates that shopping orientation moderates the evaluation of retailer communication. Overall, the results demonstrate that CSO is a valuable construct for customer segmentation and tailored communication in retailing.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 48 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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