Search results

1 – 10 of over 3000
Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 11 January 2021

Sudipta Mandal, Arvind Sahay, Adrian Terron and Kavita Mahto

Consumers subscribe to different mindsets or implicit theories of personality malleability, namely, fixed and growth mindsets. This study aims to investigate how and why…

Abstract

Purpose

Consumers subscribe to different mindsets or implicit theories of personality malleability, namely, fixed and growth mindsets. This study aims to investigate how and why consumers’ mindsets can influence their word-of-mouth (WOM) intentions toward a brand and the consequent implications for a brand’s personality.

Design/methodology/approach

Three mall-intercept studies and one online study demonstrate the influence of consumers’ fixed and growth mindsets on their WOM intentions. The first two mall-intercept studies identify motivations underlying consumers’ WOM intentions as a function of their mindset orientations. The third mall-intercept study examines the implications of such mindset-oriented WOM intentions for a brand’s personality dimension and the underlying psychological mechanism. The fourth study tests the link between WOM intent and behavior.

Findings

Results show that fixed (growth) mindset individuals exhibit greater WOM intentions than growth (fixed) mindset individuals for motives of “impression management” (“learning and information acquisition”). Findings further demonstrate that brands that exhibit dual personality dimensions simultaneously, one salient and the other non-salient at any instant, garner equivalent WOM intentions from both fixed and growth mindset individuals, contingent on the fit between the salient brand personality dimension and the dominant consumer mindset. Finally, using a real brand, it can be seen that WOM intentions actually translate into behavior.

Research limitations/implications

The study measures offline WOM intent but not offline WOM behavior.

Practical implications

This study sheds new light on branding strategy by demonstrating how and why dual-brand personalities may attract consumers with both kinds of implicit self-theory orientations. Relatedly, it also demonstrates a technique of framing ad-appeals that support the dual-brand personality effect.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study to propose and demonstrate the use of simultaneous dual-brand personalities as an optimal branding strategy.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 55 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 27 November 2019

Tae Kyung Kouzes and Barry Z. Posner

The purpose of this paper is to focus on exploring the link between managers’ mindset (fixed vs growth) and their choice of leadership behaviors.

Downloads
2687

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on exploring the link between managers’ mindset (fixed vs growth) and their choice of leadership behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample was drawn from a proprietary database provided by a global organization that offers 360-degree online leadership surveys. Individuals in management positions provided an assessment of their mindset orientation as well as how often they engaged in various leadership behaviors.

Findings

Growth-minded managers consistently displayed more frequent use of leadership behaviors than did their fixed mindset counterparts; and this relationship was independent of demographic or organizational factors.

Research limitations/implications

The findings are consistent with previous mindset research but prominently extend those results to managers in corporate settings; and supports previous research regarding the limited influence of demographic and organizational factors on both mindset and leadership.

Practical implications

Managers’ mindsets influence how much they engage in various leadership behaviors, and improving leadership competencies is more likely to occur when managers hold a growth mindset that abilities can be developed through effort as compared to fixed mindset managers who believe that abilities are inherent and unchangeable. The mindset of managers is predictive of the behavioral choices they make about exercising leadership, and has practical significance since studies have shown that managers are generally more effective in direct relationship to how often they are seen as engaging in leadership.

Originality/value

This study extends the significance of mindset from the educational to the corporate environment, using a robust sample of managers, and finding that the relationship between mindset and leadership is independent of various demographic and organizational characteristics.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 40 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 3 November 2021

Natthawut Yodchai, Pham Thi Minh Ly and Lobel Trong Thuy Tran

This study aims to adopt implicit theory (IPT) to develop a creative mindset model and drive entrepreneurial success through innovation capability (IC).

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to adopt implicit theory (IPT) to develop a creative mindset model and drive entrepreneurial success through innovation capability (IC).

Design/methodology/approach

Expert interviews were conducted using a questionnaire protocol. This study investigated the effect of the creative mindset on entrepreneurial success through IC, using a partial least squares analytical technique and by interviewing 176 Thai business owners.

Findings

The creative mindset drove entrepreneurial success through IC. Entrepreneurs possessing a growth mindset reflected and drove success directly or through IC. Although, those with a strong, fixed mindset did not significantly affect entrepreneurial success, they could drive success through IC.

Research limitations/implications

This study provides further insight into the probable causation of how the creative mindset and IC affect tourism entrepreneurs’ success. Accordingly, this study contributes a framework to help entrepreneurs’ creativity and performance in achieving their business goals.

Originality/value

Drawing from IPT, this study empirically tests and substantiates the mediating role of IC in the relationship between the creative mindset and entrepreneurial success in the tourism industry. This study can help entrepreneurs increase their managerial effectiveness.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 28 October 2020

De-Graft Owusu-Manu, Caleb Debrah, Lydia Amissah, David J. Edwards and Nicholas Chileshe

Leadership encapsulates a process of influencing others to understand what needs to be done and how it can be done. The related area of mindset behaviour which moderates…

Abstract

Purpose

Leadership encapsulates a process of influencing others to understand what needs to be done and how it can be done. The related area of mindset behaviour which moderates leadership styles adopted in various industries has hitherto received scant academic attention in a construction context. This paper thus explores the linkages between project manager's mindset behaviour and project leadership style in the construction industry.

Design/methodology/approach

Literature reviewed provides the basis for a questionnaire data collection instrument developed to gather primary data from construction professionals in the Ghanaian construction industry (GCI). A quantitative research strategy was then adopted using the Relative Importance Index (RII) to determine the level of significance of the leadership and mindset archetypes. A Pearson's correlation test was run to ascertain whether the mindset behaviour of project managers has a significant impact upon the type of leadership style.

Findings

The study's results indicate that democratic, transformational and situational leadership styles were prevalent leadership styles in the GCI. The analysis also revealed that project managers favoured the “growth mindset”. Furthermore this style had a moderate positive relationship with democratic and transformational leadership styles. Conversely, a fixed mindset had a low positive relationship with autocratic and situational leadership styles but a low negative relationship with transformational leadership style.

Research limitations/implications

This research provides sufficient data for project managers to identify the type of mindset to nurture (the growth mindset is recommended) and the effective leadership style to be employed. This study engenders wider discussion on mindset behaviour and project leadership style in developing countries. Moreover, the findings present policymakers and practitioners with the leadership styles to promote and develop (democratic, transformational and situational) and mindset behaviour (growth mindset) to ensure project success in Ghana and other developing countries.

Originality/value

This research represents the first comprehensive study appraising the linkages between project managers’ mindset behaviour and project leadership style in the construction industry. Empirical data presented bridge the identified knowledge gap that exists on the lack of theoretical understanding of the influence that project managers' mindset has on leadership styles in the GCI.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 28 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 21 October 2020

Paul Lyons and Randall P. Bandura

The purpose of this paper is to use recent empirical research and theory to help explain how a manager may assume a coaching role to assist employee learning and growth

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to use recent empirical research and theory to help explain how a manager may assume a coaching role to assist employee learning and growth. In the coaching role, performance appraisal and other information may be carefully used as feedback to reinforce growth mindset learning in the service of employee development and engagement in work tasks and in the organization.

Design/methodology/approach

Aided by search devices (Psych Articles, Google Scholar, etc.), this study explored several distinct areas of information to include: manager-as-coach, performance management/appraisal, engagement with work, mindsetsfixed and growth, feedback and self-regulation of learning. Across these domains, this study searched for linkages useful in guiding managers to assist employees to learn and change.

Findings

Coaching employees to embrace a growth mindset and one’s self-regulation of learning has been expressed as a means to improve performance, resiliency, persistence, ability to cope with change and motivation.

Practical implications

Explicit, grounded recommendations are offered to assist managers to guide employees to embrace a growth mindset and take charge of their own learning and development.

Originality/value

Through examination and coordination of streams of research and theory, the study are able to make reasonably clear some avenues for a manager to attempt to positively influence employee confidence, learning, success and growth.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 45 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 8 October 2020

Maria Jorif and Cheryl Burleigh

The purpose of this paper is to explore perspectives of secondary (9–12) teachers on how to sustain growth mindset concepts within instructional practices as well as…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore perspectives of secondary (9–12) teachers on how to sustain growth mindset concepts within instructional practices as well as identifying barriers to sustainment.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employed an exploratory case study to obtain the lived experiences of participants. An inductive analysis process was utilized on the data collected through structured interviews and a semi-structured focus group.

Findings

Four major themes emerged from an in-depth analysis process: embed growth mindset practices in daily classroom instruction, communicate verbal affirmations and implement growth mindset learning tasks, allow students to experience academic successes and failures and teachers should receive continual support.

Research limitations/implications

The study was limited to secondary grades (9–12). Therefore, it is recommended to expand the study to grades K-8.

Originality/value

Due to a gap in the literature, this study provided insights into sustaining an innovative psychological approach, growth mindset, within academic instruction. Growth mindset concepts have been supported through the work of seminal researcher Carol Dweck and other prevalent educational researchers (e.g. Robert Marzano) to provide teachers with effective classroom instructional practices that can academically progress students.

Details

Journal of Research in Innovative Teaching & Learning, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2397-7604

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 4 November 2020

Paul Lyons and Randall Bandura

The purpose of this paper is to explore the ways a manager in a coaching role may influence employees to embrace a learning orientation based upon the growth mindset

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the ways a manager in a coaching role may influence employees to embrace a learning orientation based upon the growth mindset. Conceptual in nature, this paper uses recent research, interpretations, explanations and suggestions to propose how manager-as-coach can informally and formally apply basic interventions to assist employee learning and change.

Design/methodology/approach

Based upon a review of relevant literature of theory and practice using several search tools, the authors have isolated a few critical areas to explore to include role of the coach, performance appraisal – the stimulus for manager-as-coach interaction with an employee, feedback orientation and environment, the growth mindset and learning orientation and the dynamics of self-regulated learning. Information from these areas is integrated to inform practitioners of approaches to take in a manager-as-coach role.

Findings

Included for each of the main segments presented are specific, practitioner “Commitment advice/action agendas” for manager-as-coach to stimulate and guide employee learning. These agendas contribute sound, practical information to the body of information concerned with manager-as-coach.

Originality/value

A contribution this work makes is to propose how learning orientation and the growth mindset are intertwined to the extent they assist the manager-as-coach supply the motivational support for employee learning. The resultant learning may lead to one or more of: improved work performance, individual development, attitudes toward learning and increased employee commitment or engagement.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 32 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 5 September 2016

Robert P. French II

The purpose of this paper is to explore conceptualizations of mindset across disciplines with particular attention to scholars’ care in defining and operationalizing the…

Downloads
1535

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore conceptualizations of mindset across disciplines with particular attention to scholars’ care in defining and operationalizing the construct of mindset. Theories of mindset have witnessed increased attention through a variety of disciplines for their applicability as processes with the potential to influence individual and/or organizational outcomes. Exploration of mindset conceptualizations and characterizations reveal substantial divergences.

Design/methodology/approach

This conceptual paper generally examines the utilization of mindset constructs via a multidisciplinary review of literature and specifically details three mindset theories (implemental and deliberative, global and growth and fixed mindsets) to illuminate such disparities.

Findings

This paper categorizes the significant variations of the mindset construct and research via three distinct streams. Each stream highlights knowledge as instrumental in the mindset construct; however, the ways in which varying aspects of knowledge, knowledge mechanisms or knowledge as a component of an individuals and/or organization’s identity correspond to the inherent presuppositions of varying articulations of mindset theory and praxis.

Practical implications

Effectively influencing an individual and/or organization’s mindset necessitates an accurate assessment of the mindset construct. Further, evaluating the applicability of mindset research and/or feedback from a consultant warrants attention to the assumptions undergirding the mindset construct.

Originality/value

Generally, mindset studies and theories have scantly attended to both the historical development of mindset research as well as divergences in the research record within and across disciplines. This paper attempts to address this deficiency. Further, this paper appears to be the first attempt to compare and identify varying conceptualizations and characterizations of mindset theory and, therefore, identifies previously unidentified assumptions.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 4 September 2020

Elena Delgado-Ballester

The purpose of this paper is to focus on the building of consumer–brand identification through the use of two themes (underdog and topdog) in the design of brand…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on the building of consumer–brand identification through the use of two themes (underdog and topdog) in the design of brand storytelling. It proposes that the underdog theme is superior because it is more effective in immersing readers in the story and generates higher emotional responses. The moderating effect of consumers’ implicit mindsets is also explored.

Design/methodology/approach

An experimental study with a single-factorial design is conducted with 301 consumers assigned at random to one of two brand storytelling conditions: underdog theme or topdog theme.

Findings

The results show a full mediating effect of the underdog (vs topdog) theme on brand identification through reader immersion and empathic feelings.

Research limitations/implications

The use of a fictitious brand and a specific product category may limit the generalizability of the results.

Practical implications

Placing the brand in a story with an underdog plot is more effective in catching consumers’ attention than using a topdog brand story. In particular, using an underdog theme is a good approach for targeting consumers who have a growth mindset.

Originality/value

This study explains the persuasiveness of brand storytelling in terms of the characteristics of the storytelling itself rather than the individual characteristics of consumers (e.g. their own underdog dispositions). The results also suggest that the implicit mindset of the individual plays a role.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 5 March 2018

Paul Lyons and Randall Bandura

The purpose of this paper is to address the intersection of two important areas related to employee development: mindsets and self-regulated learning. These concepts…

Downloads
568

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address the intersection of two important areas related to employee development: mindsets and self-regulated learning. These concepts suggest opportunities for managerial influence over employee behavior which may ultimately enhance organizational culture and functioning.

Design/methodology/approach

The concepts of mindsets and self-regulated learning are connected in such a way as to yield some managerial approaches to generate positive outcomes for organizations. A brief summary of the relevant literature provides a base for the positive organizational outcomes that may be obtained through a manager’s combined understanding of these two concepts.

Findings

Understanding how the concepts of mindsets and self-regulated learning are related can provide managers with tools to be used in encouraging employees toward a strengthened ability to learn, adapt, and become more valuable to the organization.

Originality/value

Useful approaches to boosting employees’ inclination to learn, adapt, change, and improve performance are developed from existing academic research.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 3000