Search results

1 – 10 of over 22000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 21 June 2013

Štefan Bojnec

This paper aims to contribute to the literature on the changing role of the defence sector in the economy at industry and enterprise levels focusing on defence‐civilian…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to contribute to the literature on the changing role of the defence sector in the economy at industry and enterprise levels focusing on defence‐civilian cooperation and defence supply networking with foreign industry enterprises from complex industry‐perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

Measuring is based on the comparative industry data and the unique survey evidence for the Slovenian defence industry enterprises to derive managerial and policy implications.

Findings

The role of the defence industry in the economy declined, but trade deficits from arms and ammunition increased. The industry enterprises can gain from defence‐civilian cooperation and defence supply chain networking with foreign industry enterprises. Information‐coordination institutions are seen to provide opportunities for future industry development in Slovenia.

Research limitations/implications

This research focuses on Slovenia. Future enhancement of the research would be to look into the possibility of applying the findings to other countries. The size of the enterprise, and even more the size of the country, does matter in the defence‐market chain activities.

Practical implications

The proposed industry firm‐level survey approach provides useful policy and managerial implications in the evaluation of defence industry supply and market chain cooperation and networking activities with foreign industry enterprises. The study proves the usefulness of the results, both to the future organizational development and as a decision‐making tool in the complex industry systems.

Originality/value

This paper adds to the industry firm‐level analyses as data management tools for evaluating the defence‐civilian cooperation and networking of complex industry market chain activities for more effective management.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 113 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 1999

Brian Kenny

Following on from the thawing‐out of the cold war and the revolutions of Eastern Europe, the threat of lower armament levels provided opportunities for the rationalisation…

Abstract

Following on from the thawing‐out of the cold war and the revolutions of Eastern Europe, the threat of lower armament levels provided opportunities for the rationalisation of European defence and its military‐industrial complexes. Coupled with the continuing threat of reduced defence expenditures and increasing competition, defence companies have reacted to the changes with a number of strategic moves involving mergers and acquisitions, market nicheing and diversification, in addition to lay‐offs and plant closures. More recently, moves towards a single European defence industry have been discussed among the major contributing member countries and their industry leaders. The integration of a defence aerospace industry seems well placed to succeed, given French co‐operation, and this should produce a formidable, global competitor. East and Central Europe’s contribution to the equation is questionable, although the early signs are that west European defence companies are establishing firm footholds in the region against strong US competition.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 99 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2000

Colin Butler, Brian Kenny and John Anchor

Reports on research into the relationship between European defence manufacturing firms and their experience of cross‐border strategic alliances. The research takes in 135…

Abstract

Reports on research into the relationship between European defence manufacturing firms and their experience of cross‐border strategic alliances. The research takes in 135 cross‐border strategic alliances involving UK and European defence manufacturing firms, ranging from firms heavily dependent on defence contracts to firms whose defence interests make up less than 10 per cent of overall business. These firms manufacture telecommunications, transport, information, lethal platforms and components for the operation of these platforms for military organisations. A main aim is to ascertain the extent of participation in strategic alliances, the types of alliances being used and the major problems experienced by the partners.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 12 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 7 August 2019

Silvia Vicente Oliva, Ángel Martínez-Sánchez and Francisco Escribano-Bernal

This paper aims to provide a strategic analysis of firms at the lowest hierarchical levels of the defence industry.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide a strategic analysis of firms at the lowest hierarchical levels of the defence industry.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents the main results of an exploratory, multiple-case study that analyses the current strategy drivers and their views about the future ones, and their impact at the lowest hierarchical levels of the defence industry in Spain.

Findings

This investigation develops and analyses a contingency model regarding the strategy impact and effects of firms’ drivers and clients, both mediated by the strategy players because of their huge impact on the defence industry. The research model focuses on the internal relations between technical and commercial activities due to the cause and effect of their capabilities. Simultaneously, pull and push mechanisms boost firms’ capabilities and requirements to provide strategic foresight.

Practical implications

Ministries of Defence (MoDs) and prime contractors will remain mediating players in the near future even with further implications for the competition of Defence Technological and Industrial Base (DTIB) firms. It implies that firms and MoDs must maintain a close relation and implement more flexible practices, such as open innovation, property rights or new commercialization schemes.

Originality/value

This study offers insights related to the specific applications and the necessity of commercial and technological areas alignment of these firms for the future.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 1999

Stephen Martin, Keith Hartley and Bernard Stafford

Although the Cold War is over, the dangers of international armed conflict remain. Multinational talks about restricting the arms trade stalled in 1992. If they resume…

Abstract

Although the Cold War is over, the dangers of international armed conflict remain. Multinational talks about restricting the arms trade stalled in 1992. If they resume, what should the British attitude be towards participation in a multilateral agreement to limit arms exports when such exports apparently make a significant contribution to the UK economy? Sensible public debates and choices need information on the likely economic impacts of alternative scenarios. This paper examines the likely effects of a one‐third reduction in the value of UK arms exports. It finds that between 13,333 and 40,000 jobs would be lost and that of those that remain in the labour force over half will find new work within a year. The South‐West would be the worst affected region losing 0.3 per cent of all jobs; defence sales would be cut by between 3 and 8 per cent; aerospace output would be cut by between 5 and 9 per cent , and total exports would fall by 0.5 per cent. There would be initial adverse effects but, over time, resources would be re‐allocated to other industries and regions.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 August 2001

Jordi Molas‐Gallart

Military technology is traditionally shrouded in secrecy. Even joint research between allies can be a marriage of convenience. But with the end of the Cold War and greater…

Abstract

Military technology is traditionally shrouded in secrecy. Even joint research between allies can be a marriage of convenience. But with the end of the Cold War and greater European integration, the technological landscape is changing, and a closer interface is emerging between military and civilian technologies. A worldwide stagnation in defence spending is accelerating the take‐up of commercial off‐the‐shelf technologies, while in the aerospace sector, the factors of safety and the environment are becoming at least as important as cost.

Details

Foresight, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6689

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1997

Keith Hartley

States that the end of the Cold War created expectations of a peace dividend. Analyses and critically evaluates the set of myths about this dividend which emerged. Reviews…

Abstract

States that the end of the Cold War created expectations of a peace dividend. Analyses and critically evaluates the set of myths about this dividend which emerged. Reviews the response of defence industries to disarmament and provides evidence from the UK.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 24 no. 1/2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 August 2006

Brian Kenny

The paper seeks to address the European Union's emerging role in the management of international security challenges and its implications for collaboration in armaments…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper seeks to address the European Union's emerging role in the management of international security challenges and its implications for collaboration in armaments procurement. While the former is about integrating member governments at policy level, the latter concerns organising states' defence industries into a cohesive and competitive supply base.

Design/methodology/approach

Theoretical frameworks include historic‐comparative analysis and the bureaucratic politics model. Independent variable comprises state actors and interest groups, while the dependent variable comprises the outcomes in terms of defence policy and armaments collaboration decisions. European armaments integration is considered, contrasting liberal inter‐governmentalism and neo‐functionalism theory. Case study data are derived from official EU document sources.

Findings

In general, national governments tend to protect important industrial actors irrespective of ownership. Bringing market and defence issues closer challenges the traditional separation between “low” and “high” politics. The collaboration in armaments acquisition is ad hoc and somewhat piecemeal in nature. Structures have evolved in an attempt to integrate the armaments process with spill‐over effect at policy level fostering armaments integration, helped by a more favourably structured and organised defence industry symptomatic of neo‐functionalism. Co‐ordination of European defence policy and armaments procurement through EDA should, in theory, lead to longer‐term co‐ordination, co‐operation and integration between the member states. The latter may see it in their interests to integrate as they come to recognize that EU institutions lack the capabilities to make policies realistic.

Originality/value

European armaments procurement and integration is not well researched; nor are the theoretical issues well understood. An explanation (model) of European armaments procurement integration is developed, along with an identification of key facilitators.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 14 August 2014

Gueorgui Ianakiev

The use of offsets is one of the main characteristics of international defence trade. The rising costs of defence equipment and the significant contraction of defence

Abstract

The use of offsets is one of the main characteristics of international defence trade. The rising costs of defence equipment and the significant contraction of defence spending have resulted in an environment that favoured the use of offset policies, the latter becoming increasingly demanding in both quantitative and qualitative terms. The chapter analyses the role of offsets on the process of integration of defence equipment markets, with a specific focus on the EU. Particular attention is given to the offset-relevant regulation and practice and to their recent evolution in the EU following the adoption of European Directive on defence and security procurement (81/81/EC). Offsets play a dual role with regard to the integration of defence industries: on one hand they can be trade-distorting and contribute to the survival of inefficient suppliers in arms importing countries; on the other hand, they can contribute in overcoming barriers that may otherwise prevent some potentially efficient suppliers from accessing the supply chains of the big system integrators. The chapter draws the attention on the need to complement the regulatory evolution by further initiatives aiming at improving the access of non-incumbent suppliers to the supply chains of the large defence system integrators.

Details

The Evolving Boundaries of Defence: An Assessment of Recent Shifts in Defence Activities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-965-2

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 4 November 2014

Oyetola Emmanuel-Ebikake, Rajkumar Roy and Essam Shehab

The purpose of this paper is to design a framework for assessing supplier sustainability (in terms of survivability) within the defence industry based on financial and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to design a framework for assessing supplier sustainability (in terms of survivability) within the defence industry based on financial and operational dimensions.

Design/methodology/approach

The research employs a case study approach to identify a research gap in the area of supplier performance measurement and proposes five dimensions to assess supplier sustainability from the review of literature and industry practice while employing a systematic approach to generate measures for each dimension with suggested actions to improve sustainability.

Findings

The sustainability measures, dimensions and improvement actions developed were validated with industrial experts from three defence companies and implemented as a sustainability system. A case study was applied and the results were generated.

Research limitations/implications

Future research could include further case study application and application of dimensions and measures to other industries.

Practical implications

The paper offers managerial implications about the need to consider the survivability of suppliers in the long term, especially in the current economic climate and think about mitigation strategies to enable economic sustainability.

Originality/value

This paper adds to the existing knowledge in the supply chain area and proposes a novel approach to supplier performance measurement and management which is holistic.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 63 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 22000