Search results

1 – 10 of over 36000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Štefan Bojnec

The purpose of this paper is to introduce cybernetic systems in defence management applications, to meet new challenges of the information society and use of system…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce cybernetic systems in defence management applications, to meet new challenges of the information society and use of system modelling for decision making.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper defines basic terms for understanding the complexity of the defence management applications, which is simplified using input‐output modelling.

Findings

The paper illustrates the interdisciplinary nature of cybernetics, systems and management sciences. The defence system is analysed and a general input‐output model for defence system development recommended.

Research limitations/implications

New data technology and data availability provide perspective for applied research using scientific approach.

Practical implications

Cybernetic systems for defence provide analytical modelling for management applications.

Originality/value

The paper presents a concept and empirical evidence for defence system analysis and a new way of thinking that affects defence planning and defence management. A cybernetic, systemic and input‐output methodology provides solutions for defence management applications.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 42 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Peter R.J. Trim

The British Government is driven by the concept of value for money and is seeking ways in which to fund projects in the public sector. In the defence sector, this is…

Abstract

The British Government is driven by the concept of value for money and is seeking ways in which to fund projects in the public sector. In the defence sector, this is resulting in the formation of public‐private partnerships and a close working relationship between the Government and defence companies. As well as placing the UK’s defence capability within the context of national security, it also needs to be placed within the context of the Government’s foreign policy which is focused on international conflict prevention. The UK Government remains committed to encouraging international collaboration as this should witness technology transfer from the defence sector to the civil sector. Makes reference to nine factors which underlie collaboration in the defence sector and draws on the expertise of defence sector experts who provide insights into the defence industry. Refers to a postal survey which was undertaken in 1999 in order to establish which areas of defence management would receive increased attention in both the short term and the long term. Finally, highlights the Executive Intelligence Alliance Policy and Strategy (EIAPS) Charter which can be used by defence company personnel as a framework to develop long‐term working relationships with other defence companies, government departments and universities.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Satya Paul

Estimates a three‐equation model to test various economic hypotheses regarding the relationship between unemployment rate and defence spending in 18 OECD countries during…

Abstract

Estimates a three‐equation model to test various economic hypotheses regarding the relationship between unemployment rate and defence spending in 18 OECD countries during the period 1962‐1988. Reveals that the relationship which exists between unemployment rate and defence spending is not uniform across countries. Defence spending has a favourable impact on unemployment rate in Germany and Australia, whereas in Denmark it worsens the employment situation. In Australia, Germany and Belgium, non‐defence spending and the unemployment rate are causally independent. Defence spending appears to act as a stablization tool in response to changes in the unemployment rate only in the UK. No significant causal relationship between unemployment rate and either type of spending is revealed in Japan, The Netherlands, Italy, Spain, Austria, New Zealand, Sweden, Canada and the USA. Observes a few cases of bi‐directional causality between unemployment rate and defence/non‐defence spending. Gives possible explanations for the observed cross‐country variability in causal relation.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Selim Aren and Hatice Nayman Hamamcı

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between defence mechanisms, one of the unconscious processes, and phantasy. In addition, the scale of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between defence mechanisms, one of the unconscious processes, and phantasy. In addition, the scale of financial defence mechanisms, which is a version of the defence mechanisms adapted to financial issues, has been developed and tested.

Design/methodology/approach

For this purpose, first, a pilot study was conducted for the financial defence mechanism scale. The data was collected 179 subjects in Turkey through online surveys with convenience sampling method between the dates of 6 March and 21 March 2020, and then additional data was collected in Turkey between the dates of 28 April and 14 June 2020. The total number of subjects is 644. The authors exploited IBM SPSS Statistics and AMOS for analysis. Exploratory factor analysis, ANOVA, Independent t-test and Correlation analysis were performed. In addition, confirmatory factor analysis was performed after additional data collection process with structural equation modelling.

Findings

As a result of the analyses, only two of the defence mechanisms (mature and neurotic) and three of the financial defence mechanisms (mature, neurotic and immature) were found to be positively correlated with phantasy, which is considered a determinant of financial bubbles. In addition, a positive relationship was found between risky investment intention and two of the defence mechanisms (immature and neurotic) and three of the financial defence mechanisms (mature, immature and neurotic).

Originality/value

The study is unique due to its findings and developed scale. The findings are valuable in that the theoretically alleged relations were also obtained empirically.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

Content available
Article

Thomas Ekström, Per Hilletofth and Per Skoglund

Defence supply chains (SCs) aim at operational outcomes, and armed forces depend on them to provide availability and preparedness in peace and sustainability in war…

Abstract

Purpose

Defence supply chains (SCs) aim at operational outcomes, and armed forces depend on them to provide availability and preparedness in peace and sustainability in war. Previous research has focussed on strategies for SCs aiming at financial outcomes. This raises the question of how suitable commercial supply chain strategies (SCSs) are for supply chain design (SCD) in defence. The purpose of this paper is to explain the constructs of SCSs that satisfy military operational requirements and to propose SCSs that are appropriate in defence.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reports on a Delphi study with 20 experts from Swedish defence authorities. Through three Delphi rounds, two workshops and a validation round, these experts contributed to the reported findings.

Findings

The findings demonstrate that commercial SC constructs are acceptable and applicable in defence but not sufficient. An additional strategy is required to satisfy requirements on availability, preparedness and sustainability. The paper shows that different requirements in peace and war make it challenging to design suitable defence SCs and proposes eight SCSs that satisfy these requirements.

Research limitations/implications

The results emanate from the Swedish defence context and further research is required for generalisation.

Originality/value

This paper extends theory by investigating SCs aiming at operational outcomes. For managers in companies and defence authorities, it explicates how the unique issues in defence must influence SCD to satisfy operational requirements.

Details

Journal of Defense Analytics and Logistics, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2399-6439

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part

Keith Hartley, Renaud Bellais and Jean-Paul Hébert

The European defence industry has changed considerably since the late 1980s. The end of the Cold War required the industry to undertake major restructuring, especially…

Abstract

The European defence industry has changed considerably since the late 1980s. The end of the Cold War required the industry to undertake major restructuring, especially when governments, expecting to reap a “peace dividend,” drastically cut procurement spending. In the early 2000s this restructuring was also influenced by the new context of international security, even though defence budgets have started to increase again since 1998. The European defence industry could not expect to escape from a radical transformation, beyond the specific crisis engendered by the end of the Cold War.

Details

War, Peace and Security
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-535-2

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part

Renaud Bellais

Launched in the early 1990s in the United Kingdom, Public-Private Partnerships (PPPs) induced radical changes in both the public-private boundaries and the production of…

Abstract

Launched in the early 1990s in the United Kingdom, Public-Private Partnerships (PPPs) induced radical changes in both the public-private boundaries and the production of state-provided services. Such ‘budgetary revolution’ impacted the biggest state spender in capital expenditures, that is, the Ministry of Defence. Today many MoDs are expected to leverage on the British experience and develop their own approach of PPPs to overcome both the ineffectiveness of their defence spending and today’s stalemate in public budgets. This chapter leverages on British experiences over the past two decades to analyse the benefits and limits of PPPs in the realm of defence. Does such contractual arrangement fit defence-related investment? This chapter explores the on-going redefinition of public and private realms in military matters and it puts into relief the key dimensions of PPPs in terms of contractual arrangement.

Details

The Evolving Boundaries of Defence: An Assessment of Recent Shifts in Defence Activities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-965-2

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part

Josselin Droff

This chapter discusses the ongoing transformations of the French defence support. Considering the importance of economic activities related to defence support, this…

Abstract

This chapter discusses the ongoing transformations of the French defence support. Considering the importance of economic activities related to defence support, this contribution aims at discussing the evolution of defence support and its costs for the State. The literature in defence economics presents very little analysis of defence support in its different forms. Neither space nor base locations have been deeply analysed in such a literature. We try to bridge this gap in an original research framework. We focus on the Maintenance, Repair and Overhaul (MRO) of defence platforms. More particularly, we focus on the array of measures that surround French defence support in MRO since the end of the 1990s. Considering both economic and spatial leverages, how can the organisation of MRO be optimised? With concepts from spatial economics, we propose a new look on the defence support system. We examine new economic interconnections (e.g. Public Private Partnerships and outsourcing) between military and civilian activities. More broadly speaking, this path of research could help us to better understand the new type of economic interrelations between defence organisation and ‘territory’ as a social fabric.

Details

The Evolving Boundaries of Defence: An Assessment of Recent Shifts in Defence Activities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-965-2

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part

Nilufer Narli

The EU harmonisation has created changes in the military's formal and informal influence in the directions of decreased formal and informal military influence in civilian…

Abstract

The EU harmonisation has created changes in the military's formal and informal influence in the directions of decreased formal and informal military influence in civilian politics. The EU reforms have created changes in the mindset of the citizens, by creating changes in the security culture of the citizens and in the civil-military related political culture. The desired level of alignment has not been reached. Therefore, the study examines the areas where further alignment is required. Moving from Rebecca L. Schiff's concordance theory, the article examines the relationship between the Turkish military, the civilian politics and the society before and after the EU harmonisation process. It examines the effects of the EU harmonisation process on the changes in the civil-military balance of power, and on the related security culture and political values. The analysis focuses on: (i) increased civilian control and consequent changes in the policy of accountability; (ii) transparency building in the defence sector; (iii) parliamentary oversight; and (iv) the change in the political culture related to the civil-military issues. It also investigates the extent the EU harmonisation has achieved in building democratic civil-military relations in order to align with the EU standards.

Details

Advances in Military Sociology: Essays in Honor of Charles C. Moskos
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-893-9

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part

Gueorgui Ianakiev

The use of offsets is one of the main characteristics of international defence trade. The rising costs of defence equipment and the significant contraction of defence

Abstract

The use of offsets is one of the main characteristics of international defence trade. The rising costs of defence equipment and the significant contraction of defence spending have resulted in an environment that favoured the use of offset policies, the latter becoming increasingly demanding in both quantitative and qualitative terms. The chapter analyses the role of offsets on the process of integration of defence equipment markets, with a specific focus on the EU. Particular attention is given to the offset-relevant regulation and practice and to their recent evolution in the EU following the adoption of European Directive on defence and security procurement (81/81/EC). Offsets play a dual role with regard to the integration of defence industries: on one hand they can be trade-distorting and contribute to the survival of inefficient suppliers in arms importing countries; on the other hand, they can contribute in overcoming barriers that may otherwise prevent some potentially efficient suppliers from accessing the supply chains of the big system integrators. The chapter draws the attention on the need to complement the regulatory evolution by further initiatives aiming at improving the access of non-incumbent suppliers to the supply chains of the large defence system integrators.

Details

The Evolving Boundaries of Defence: An Assessment of Recent Shifts in Defence Activities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-965-2

1 – 10 of over 36000