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Article
Publication date: 25 February 2019

Sunil Venaik and David F. Midgley

This paper aims to identify the archetypes of marketing mix standardization-adaptation in MNC subsidiaries and to examine the relationships between MNC subsidiary strategy…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify the archetypes of marketing mix standardization-adaptation in MNC subsidiaries and to examine the relationships between MNC subsidiary strategy, environment and performance through the theoretical lenses of fit and equifinality.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use a mail survey to collect data from MNC subsidiary business units located in multiple countries. They apply a novel archetypal analysis method to identify the diverse archetypes of marketing mix standardization-adaptation in MNC subsidiaries. Finally, through cross-tabulation and regression analysis, they examine the relationships between MNC strategy, environment and performance.

Findings

They identify four archetypes of MNC subsidiary standardization-adaptation including a new archetype that is not recognized in the literature. This analysis finds partial support for both fit and equifinality, suggesting complementarity between the two theories.

Research limitations/implications

The study could be extended with longitudinal data to examine the dynamics in MNC marketing mix strategy and performance in response to the changing business environment.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that MNC subsidiary managers could deploy a broader set of international marketing strategy configurations than those currently prescribed to enhance performance.

Originality/value

The authors use a novel configuration-based archetypal analysis method and extend the theoretical typology of international marketing strategies pursued by MNC subsidiaries. The partial support for both fit and equifinality expands the theoretical lens through which we can examine the relationships between MNC marketing strategy, environment and performance.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 53 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 14 December 2018

David F. Midgley, Sunil Venaik and Demetris Christopoulos

The aim of this chapter is to: (1) model culture as a configuration of multiple values, (2) identify different culture archetypes across the globe, and (3) empirically demonstrate…

Abstract

The aim of this chapter is to: (1) model culture as a configuration of multiple values, (2) identify different culture archetypes across the globe, and (3) empirically demonstrate heterogeneity in culture archetypes within and across 52 countries. We use Schwartz values from the World Values Survey (WVS) and the archetypal analysis (AA) method to identify diverse culture archetypes within and across countries. We find significant heterogeneity in culture values archetypes within countries and homogeneity across countries, calling into question the assumption of uniform national culture values in economics and other fields. We show how the heterogeneity in culture values across the globe can be represented with a small number of distinctive archetypes. The study could be extended to include a larger set of countries, and/or cover a broader range of theoretically grounded values than those available in the Schwartz values model in the WVS. Research and practice often assume cultural homogeneity within nations and cultural diversity across nations. Our finding of different culture archetypes within countries and similar archetypes across countries demonstrates the important role of culture sharing and exchange as a source of reducing cultural conflicts between nations and enhancing creativity and innovation through interaction and integration in novel ways. We examine culture as a configuration of multiple values, and use a novel AA method to capture heterogeneity in culture values within and across countries.

Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-727-8

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1970

David Midgley

Analyses, in depth, the problem of overlap between the areas of different television companies, the effect on this of the new UHF television network, and the implications from a…

Abstract

Analyses, in depth, the problem of overlap between the areas of different television companies, the effect on this of the new UHF television network, and the implications from a marketing viewpoint. Based mainly on the results of research carried out by the author in the summer of 1969, and reported elsewhere in greater detail. Focuses on the marketing implications of the existing and future overlap areas between ITV companies. Couples some projects of future overlaps made on the basis of existing information and discusses the difference between UHF and VHF frequencies. Summarises that this analysis has shown an area definition is needed which is more suited to the needs of marketing and enabling the more efficient use of resources.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 November 2008

Tim R. Coltman, Timothy M. Devinney and David F. Midgley

There is a great divide between the degree to which academic research accounts for the role of managerial discretion in firm performance and the weight given by the popular press…

Abstract

Purpose

There is a great divide between the degree to which academic research accounts for the role of managerial discretion in firm performance and the weight given by the popular press and financial community to the importance of the management of an organization. The purpose of this paper is to bridge this gap by quantifying the way managerial beliefs influence the quality of firm performance in a turbulent environment based on e‐business.

Design/methodology/approach

An e‐business research setting is used that is associated with a situation of environmental turbulence to allow for sufficient variance in managerial beliefs to measure their effect on firm performance. The sample contains 293 firms.

Findings

Aggregate level results indicate that managerial beliefs have a positive and significant effect on firm performance. Four distinctive segments were also found to exist. These segments vary in terms of the strength of the position that a manager holds regarding the value of e‐business and firm performance.

Originality/value

The paper shows that the affect of e‐business on firm performance is not structural in the sense that firm performance does not depend on the firm or industry but is reflective of the strength of the beliefs held by managers. This implies that the “black box” approach that is characteristic of much management research may be problematic because it fails to measure the variables that may matter most to performance.

Details

Journal of Strategy and Management, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-425X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1997

Philip L. Dawes, Paul G. Patterson and David F. Midgley

Using data collected from 302 firms spanning a wide range of industry sectors, tests a model designed to explain the decision of whether to use or not to use an outside technical…

1095

Abstract

Using data collected from 302 firms spanning a wide range of industry sectors, tests a model designed to explain the decision of whether to use or not to use an outside technical consultant when purchasing a big‐ticket, high technology product in the information technology area. The results indicate that different categories of variables influence the decision to include or not to include an outside technical consultant in the buying center. In order to assess the degree of convergent validity in our findings, a second model was tested using a somewhat different, but nonetheless related dependent measure, namely the extent of the consultants’ involvement across eight buying stages. Overall, the model testing results provide good support for the majority of the hypothesized relationships, especially those related to the buyer’s access to external networks, product class knowledge, and technical/administrative role. A major finding is that 28 percent of firms in our sample engaged an outside consultant to help them make the purchasing decision. Analysis of the consultants’ extent of participation in these purchasing decisions indicates that they had high involvement in seven of the eight buying stages. Though the consultants were found to have least involvement in the final stage of the buying process, i.e. the selection of the preferred supplier, it seems reasonable to expect that they are key influencers in this final stage as they had a significant effect on shaping all the preceding buying stages.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 23 December 2005

Tim R. Coltman, Timothy M. Devinney and David F. Midgley

The field of strategy has long been preoccupied with explaining, and attempting to predict organizational performance. Indeed, the quest to understand how to gain and hold an…

Abstract

The field of strategy has long been preoccupied with explaining, and attempting to predict organizational performance. Indeed, the quest to understand how to gain and hold an advantage over competitors is the primary way in which strategy distinguishes itself from other organizational sciences (Meyer, 1991). Strategic choices are made in anticipation of, or in response to, that competitive context and the performance implications that result, are of central interest to strategy researchers.

Details

Strategy Process
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-340-2

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1996

Jens Kristian Steen Jacobsen

This paper explores route‐choice patterns among motorists on a scenic road in south‐western Norway. Factor analysis is used to identify the characteristics of the types of…

Abstract

This paper explores route‐choice patterns among motorists on a scenic road in south‐western Norway. Factor analysis is used to identify the characteristics of the types of motorists who seek particular benefits when they choose to travel along this specific route. Five factors were found: 1) experiencing landscapes and attractions; 2) outdoor recreation; 3) off the beaten track; 4) a suitable road; and 5) a variation of travel experiences. In conclusion, the paper offers an alternative framework of road choice structures.

Details

The Tourist Review, vol. 51 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0251-3102

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Ed Chung and Kim Whalen

This article is premised on the idea that social networks represent an important, but often overlooked, unit of analysis in management and entrepreneurship studies. The concept of…

1103

Abstract

This article is premised on the idea that social networks represent an important, but often overlooked, unit of analysis in management and entrepreneurship studies. The concept of embeddedness, emphasizing the significance of social relationships, is of particular relevance as more and more frequently minorities and immigrants engage in small businessownership. This article borrows from the ethnicity and social network traditions, and offers that an analysis of the ethnic homogeneity of an entrepreneur's strong and weak social ties would be fruitful in gauging entrepreneurial success.

Details

New England Journal of Entrepreneurship, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2574-8904

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 23 December 2005

Abstract

Details

Strategy Process
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-340-2

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