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Article
Publication date: 16 November 2022

David Cox

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the increased impact that academic research can gain when collaborating and sharing knowledge with corporate stakeholders and marketing…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the increased impact that academic research can gain when collaborating and sharing knowledge with corporate stakeholders and marketing practitioners, through the lens of managing tier demotion and deceitful behaviors in a channel marketing program. In particular, this paper highlights that true impact (defined as being meaningful change) can only be achieved when the research findings are operationalized and deployed as a business solution.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach taken in this paper is to challenge the traditional paradigm where field research is led by academics and places the corporate stakeholder at the centre of the research, where they have a leading role. This involves identifying, selecting, collaborating and engaging with key corporate stakeholders early in the research project, thus gaining their input and support so that the research recommendations secure the necessary funding to be successfully deployed.

Findings

The authors highlight two research projects focused on tier demotion and disengagement and deceitful behaviour driven from incentivise and gamifying learning. A new tier demotion process involving a highly customised customer care charter has been deployed and resulted in a re-engagement rate of 81% from those channel partners who were demoted (a rise from 40%). Deceitful behaviour detection tools were also deployed, resulting in 4,300 possible deceptive cases being investigated and resolved in Year 1, reducing to 451 in Year 6.

Research limitations/implications

The change in research approach where field research places the corporate stakeholder at the centre of the research will add to the complexity of the research project, impact on timelines and introduce more stakeholders into the research team, which may have wider implications to the original research goal.

Practical implications

This transition will require academics to know more about their corporate partner, the corporate landscape, adding to the complexity of the research project and cede some control over the project.

Originality/value

Whilst academic research contributes to a body of theoretical concepts, equally important is bringing to life the research findings to show actual impact and meaningful change within the research setting. The present research approach has since been applied to multiple channel loyalty programmes across numerous industries increasing revenue and driving the success of the respective programmes. One key learning would be to engage more corporate stakeholders as part of the research project from the outset. The author neglected the legal and trust and compliance team and they had a significant impact on what findings were eventually implemented.

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2000

Annie S. Anderson and David Cox

The Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food funded the project increasing vegetable and fruit consumption between 1994 and 1996. The project was carried out in three phases…

1167

Abstract

The Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food funded the project increasing vegetable and fruit consumption between 1994 and 1996. The project was carried out in three phases comprising a nationwide survey of attitudes towards increasing fruit and vegetable intake, a community‐based intervention trial and a workplace intervention trial. This paper reports qualitative data from focus group work with participants of the phase 2 community intervention describing some of the realities and challenges associated with achieving five a day in a free‐living setting.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 January 2020

David Perkins, Gita Mathur and Kam Jugdev

The purpose of this paper is to draw on the resource-based view of the firm from strategic management and apply it to a study of competitive advantage in the project management…

1021

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to draw on the resource-based view of the firm from strategic management and apply it to a study of competitive advantage in the project management context. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) is used to examine the factors that constitute strategic characteristics of project management resources and outcomes of the project management process.

Design/methodology/approach

This study gathered data from 437 North American project management professionals using an existing survey tool from prior research involving a smaller sample.

Findings

The final model derived from CFA demonstrated construct validity, meaning acceptable convergent and discriminant validity. It showed only minor differences from a prior exploratory factor analysis (EFA). The final model consisted of two factors representing valuable project management characteristics, one factor representing rare project management characteristics, one factor representing inimitable project management characteristics, three factors representing organizational support for project management assets, one factor representing project-level performance and one factor representing firm-level performance.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations of the study include self-report bias and the use of a panel for data collection.

Practical implications

This study draws managerial attention to project management characteristics that constitute a source of competitive advantage.

Originality/value

The study validates a survey tool from previous research, reflects few deviations from factor structure of the prior EFA, and sets the stage for future research to elaborate on the conceptual model. It extends understanding of the characteristics of project management assets that lead to a firm’s competitive advantage.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1955

AN interesting comment from the Salisbury and South Wilts team of industrialists who put the first Local Productivity Council Circuit Scheme into operation in their area suggests…

Abstract

AN interesting comment from the Salisbury and South Wilts team of industrialists who put the first Local Productivity Council Circuit Scheme into operation in their area suggests that this scheme may prove invaluable in awakening general interest in, and in giving practical impetus to, increased productivity at all levels.

Details

Work Study, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Rachel Crane

Film provides an alternative medium for assessing our interpretations of cultural icons. This selective list looks at the film and video sources for information on and…

1178

Abstract

Film provides an alternative medium for assessing our interpretations of cultural icons. This selective list looks at the film and video sources for information on and interpretations of the life of Woody Guthrie.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 8 May 2009

David Cox

446

Abstract

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Article
Publication date: 4 October 2021

Ganesaraman Kalyanasundaram, Sitaram Ramachandrula and Bala Subrahmanya Mungila Hillemane

Entrepreneurs nurture their ambitions of founding tech start-ups that facilitate significant innovations despite vulnerability and considerable uncertainty by resolutely…

1128

Abstract

Purpose

Entrepreneurs nurture their ambitions of founding tech start-ups that facilitate significant innovations despite vulnerability and considerable uncertainty by resolutely addressing multiple challenges to avert failures. The paper aims to answer how soon do tech start-ups fail, given their lifecycle comprising multiple stages of formation and what attributes hasten failure of tech start-ups over their lifecycle? These questions have not been answered adequately, particularly in the context of India's emerging economy, where an aspiring start-up ecosystem is striving to flourish at an exceptional rate.

Design/methodology/approach

The study addressed two specific objectives: (1) Does life expectancy vary between life-cycle stages? and (2) What attributes impact tech start-ups' failures? Primary data were gathered from 151 cofounders (101 who have experienced failure and 50 who are successful and continuing their operations) from India's 6 leading start-up hubs. The survival analysis techniques were used, including non-parametric Kaplan–Meier estimator, to study the first objective and semi-parametric Cox proportional hazard regression to explore the second objective.

Findings

The survival probability log-rank statistics ascertain that life expectancy is different across the life-cycle stages, namely emergence, stability and growth. The hazard ratios (HRs) throw light on attributes like stage, revenue, conflict with investors, number of current start-ups, cofounder experience, level of confidence (LoC) and educational qualifications as the key attributes that influence start-up life expectancy over its lifecycle.

Practical implications

The empirical study on tech start-ups' life expectancy has practical implications for entrepreneurs and investors besides guiding the ecosystem's policymakers. First, the study helps entrepreneurs plan for resources and be aware of their start-up journey's potential pitfalls. Second, the study helps investors to establish the engagement framework and plan their future funding strategy. Third, the study helps policymakers to design and establish progressive support mechanisms that can prevent a start-up's failure.

Originality/value

First and foremost, start-up life expectancy study by life-cycle stages provide detailed insights on start-ups' failures. The theoretical framework defined is replicable, scalable and distinctly measurable for studying the start-up failure phenomenon. The life expectancy of tech start-ups by life-cycle stage is a critical empirical contribution. Next, the attributes impacting start-up life expectancy are identified in the context of an emerging economy.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 27 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1991

Elaine Cox Clever and David P. Dillard

That there has been an unprecedented growth in accumulated knowledge, and a corresponding growth in the size of library collections has been recognized as a truism in library…

Abstract

That there has been an unprecedented growth in accumulated knowledge, and a corresponding growth in the size of library collections has been recognized as a truism in library literature for at least the past 20 years. Today we continue to see the emergence of new fields and subfields, with each contributing to the exponential growth of the amount of material published. Librarians find their time sliced thinner and thinner as more and more demands are placed upon them due to growing job responsibilities as well as the need to keep current both in their subject specialities and with the technical developments in librarianship. Newer interdisciplinary fields create an even greater problem because of the broader range of expertise required by the various disciplines that comprise these fields.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2002

Joy Terentis, Fabian Sander, Maureen Madden, Merlin Stone and David Cox

This paper examines the regulatory requirements for the management of customer complaints in financial services. It describes the outcomes of new research, which show that most…

2175

Abstract

This paper examines the regulatory requirements for the management of customer complaints in financial services. It describes the outcomes of new research, which show that most financial services companies are some way from being able to meet these new regulatory requirements. It identifies the processes that must be followed to fulfil these requirements and outlines the type of system that is likely to be able to support meeting these requirements. Finally, it identifies that the probable reason for the neglect of this area is the heavy involvement of most financial services companies’ customer service functions in meeting the needs of the sales process (before, during and after the sale) rather than the more traditional role of customer service ‐ listening to customers and solving their problems.

Details

Journal of Financial Regulation and Compliance, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1358-1988

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1993

Henry C. Lucas, Peter Weill, David Willey and Sheila Cox

Do it right, and your investment in information technology can have ail sorts of strategic payoffs. Do it wrong, and you'll be paying, dearly, for nothing. Here's a guide to…

Abstract

Do it right, and your investment in information technology can have ail sorts of strategic payoffs. Do it wrong, and you'll be paying, dearly, for nothing. Here's a guide to evaluating IT and measuring its impact.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

1 – 10 of over 1000