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Article
Publication date: 24 May 2013

Ruchika Jaitli and Ying Hua

This study aims to explore the association between employees' sense of belonging and their perception of workplace physical attributes at a corporate campus, and the…

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the association between employees' sense of belonging and their perception of workplace physical attributes at a corporate campus, and the workplace planning and management strategies to support employee sense of belonging for the long‐term competitiveness and performance of organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

The research site for this study is the corporate campus of a large information technology firm, Wipro Technologies, located in India. A workplace questionnaire designed by the International Workplace Studies Program (IWSP) at Cornell University was used. A total of 267 employees working at Wipro participated in this study.

Findings

Factor analysis of the survey items identified five underlying factors that are related to workplace physical environment. Statistically significant correlations were identified among employees' sense of belonging and these factors about work environment. A statistically significant model comprising four of the factors was developed to predict employees' sense of belonging.

Originality/value

The paper presents a new model to link sense of belonging to perception of workplace physical environment. Workplace planning and management implications were discussed for organizations to incorporate physical and spatial measures in their workplace to effectively enhance employees' sense of belonging.

Details

Journal of Corporate Real Estate, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-001X

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2000

Margaret Latshaw

For the corporate real estate (CRE) executive who has the opportunity to plan a campus, this paper presents guidelines to ensure that campus workplace solutions are…

Abstract

For the corporate real estate (CRE) executive who has the opportunity to plan a campus, this paper presents guidelines to ensure that campus workplace solutions are aligned not only with corporate objectives but with the corporate culture as well. The paper draws on a variety of corporate campus solutions and emphasises the importance of understanding the role of CRE in supporting the company’s unique culture and in enabling change to that culture.

Details

Journal of Corporate Real Estate, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-001X

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Article
Publication date: 3 October 2016

Riikka Kyrö, Antti Peltokorpi and Karlos Artto

This paper aims to increase understanding on how co-locating in a multi-firm campus setting could be of value to healthcare organizations.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to increase understanding on how co-locating in a multi-firm campus setting could be of value to healthcare organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents a qualitative case study of two health campuses in Finland. The data comprises interviews with different organizations operating on the campuses, complemented by onsite observations, and analysis of archival data.

Findings

Based on the empirical analysis, the value of co-locating as perceived by the organizations operating on campus is grouped into four categories: connectivity, cost-efficiency, community and collaboration (or the “four Cs”).

Research limitations/implications

The study does not aim at statistical genaralizability but rather seeks to draw analytical generalizations based on identified empirical regularities. The developed value framework, the four Cs, contributes to current scholarly knowledge on location strategies.

Practical implications

Furthermore, the managerial implications of the four Cs entail a new twofold role for property management: the traditional facilitator role, which is suitable for delivering the two tangible values of connectivity and cost-efficiency, and the modern era integrator, a community builder that is able to deliver community and collaboration.

Originality/value

Previous literature on healthcare facilities has focused on the technical performance of the buildings, while previous literature on the collaborative value of co-location has studied mainly single-firm corporate campuses. This study uniquely explores the potential value of health campuses, where different private, public and third sector organizations co-locate.

Details

Facilities, vol. 34 no. 13/14
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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Article
Publication date: 21 February 2020

Leaya Amey, Ryan Plummer and Gary Pickering

This study aims to better understand the communication of sustainability by Canadian universities, specifically the use of websites, interactive features and sustainability plans.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to better understand the communication of sustainability by Canadian universities, specifically the use of websites, interactive features and sustainability plans.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 95 Canadian universities were included in this study. The mixed-methods approach sought to capture the communication of sustainability via websites, the interactive features used, as well as to evaluate the quality of sustainability plans.

Findings

The study revealed that 67% of universities address sustainability on their websites. On average, universities offer three to four interactive features on their sustainability-related Web pages, and the average score of the quality of campus sustainability plans was 29 (out of 41).

Research limitations/implications

This study does not investigate the extent to which interactive features enhance the involvement and participation in sustainability efforts or the extent to which the sustainability plans were put into practice by universities.

Practical implications

The findings assist with understanding how higher education institutions (HEIs) can enhance their sustainability communication via their websites to encourage interaction and engagement in campus sustainability. The findings can also help universities to enhance the effectiveness of sustainability plans.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first research to assess sustainability content and the interactive features on sustainability-related pages of Canadian universities’ websites. The quality of sustainability plans is also evaluated. The study informs the present understanding of communicating sustainability by Canadian universities and provides a basis for future investigations in HEIs in Canada and beyond.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 7 May 2021

Sascha Naomi Jansz, Terry van Dijk and Mark P. Mobach

The purpose of this paper is to investigate which critical success factors (CSFs) influence interaction on campuses as identified by the facility directors (FDs) of Dutch…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate which critical success factors (CSFs) influence interaction on campuses as identified by the facility directors (FDs) of Dutch university campuses and to discuss how these compare with the literature.

Design/methodology/approach

All 13 Dutch university campus FDs were interviewed (office and walking interview), focussing on CSFs relating to spaces and services that facilitate interaction. Open coding and thematic analysis resulted in empirically driven categories indicated by the respondents. Similarities and differences between the CSFs as previously identified in the literature are discussed.

Findings

The following categories emerged: constraints, motivators, designing spaces, designing services, building community and creating coherence. The campus is seen as a system containing subsystems and is itself part of a wider system (environment), forming a layered structure. Constraints and motivators are part of the environment but cannot be separated from the other four categories, as they influence their applicability.

Research limitations/implications

This study was limited to interviews with FDs and related staff. The richness of the findings shows that this was a relevant and efficient data collection strategy for the purpose of this study.

Practical implications

By viewing the campus as an open system, this study puts the practical applicability of CSFs into perspective yet provides a clear overview of CSFs related to campus interaction that may be included in future campus design policies.

Social implications

This (more) complete overview of CSFs identified in both literature and practice will help FDs, policymakers and campus designers to apply these CSFs in their campus designs. This improved campus design would increase the number of knowledge sharing interactions, contributing to innovation and valorisation. This could create a significant impact in all research fields, such as health, technology or well-being, benefitting society as a whole.

Originality/value

This study provides a comprehensive overview and comparison of CSFs from both literature and practice, allowing more effective application of CSFs in campus design policies. A framework for future studies on CSFs for interaction on campuses is provided.

Details

Facilities , vol. 39 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2021

Shang Gao, Sui Pheng Low and Hua Qian Gong

The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of the activity-based workspace (ABW) on employee belonging. Place attachment theory (PAT) is used as a proxy to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of the activity-based workspace (ABW) on employee belonging. Place attachment theory (PAT) is used as a proxy to understand and measure the belongingness of employees to their physical workplaces.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study of a bank’s newly retrofitted ABW office is conducted, providing fresh perspectives on the effect of ABW on employee belonging. A questionnaire survey was used to understand employee belongingness. Surveys are conducted with employees of the bank (n = 100) who experienced the transition from the conventional open-plan office with designated seats to an ABW, to understand and compare the change in employee belonging after the transition, by studying the level of belonging achieved in the space before and after.

Findings

The results showed that there was a positive sense of belongingness amongst employees working in the ABW space, as per the PAT framework and an increased sense of belongingness compared with the previous conventional open-plan office. However, ABWs were found to also have a negative effect on employees’ sense of control and security.

Originality/value

Maslow’s hierarchy of needs indicates that a feeling of belonging is fundamental to humans. The need for belonging is also applicable in the workplaces of today’s progressive corporate organisations, where there is increased pressure and incentive to appeal to and retain talent. This research was conducted in response to the huge growth in interest in activity-based working across the corporate real estate community. As there has been no prior research done in the area of the emotional need for belongingness in ABW.

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Article
Publication date: 30 March 2012

Per Anker Jensen, Theo van der Voordt, Christian Coenen, Daniel von Felten, Anna‐Liisa Lindholm, Susanne Balslev Nielsen, Chaiwat Riratanaphong and Mirjam Pfenninger

This article aims to present and compare research perspectives and theoretical reflections from a variety of academic fields on the concept of added value of facilities management.

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Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to present and compare research perspectives and theoretical reflections from a variety of academic fields on the concept of added value of facilities management.

Design/methodology/approach

The starting point is the so‐called FM Value Map, which was presented in a recent article in Facilities by Per Anker Jensen in 2010. The article is a first result of the work in the EuroFM research collaboration group and is based on literature reviews of the most influential journals within the academic fields of facilities management (FM), corporate real estate management and business‐to‐business marketing.

Findings

Good relationship management and building on trust is shown to be equally important as delivering the agreed services.

Originality/value

Usually the concept of added value is discussed from a monodisciplinary point‐of‐view. The different backgrounds of the authors add value to an increased understanding of the added value of FM by comparing and testing different ways of conceptualising this issue. This is of great importance to FM research and evidence‐based FM as a sound basis for the long‐term recognition of FM.

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2003

Franklin Becker, William Sims and Johanna H. Schoss

Corporate campuses have been justified on many grounds, including lower operational costs, greater flexibility, stronger corporate branding and enhanced cross‐functional…

Abstract

Corporate campuses have been justified on many grounds, including lower operational costs, greater flexibility, stronger corporate branding and enhanced cross‐functional communication. Despite the tens of millions of dollars spent to acquire and develop them, little research exists that has systematically tested the validity of the benefits attributed to a corporate campus. This paper reports on an initial set of case studies examining one potential benefit of a corporate campus: the nature and extent of communication across organisational units. The results suggest that the amount of cross‐unit communication on a corporate campus may be less than expected. Implications for workplace and collocation strategies are discussed.

Details

Journal of Corporate Real Estate, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-001X

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Book part
Publication date: 5 February 2016

Daniel Davis and Amy Binder

This study documents a new case of the further commercialization of the university, the rapid adoption of corporate partnership programs (CPPs) within centralized…

Abstract

This study documents a new case of the further commercialization of the university, the rapid adoption of corporate partnership programs (CPPs) within centralized university career services departments. CPPs function as a type of headhunting agency. For an annual fee they facilitate a corporate hiring department’s direct access to student talent, allowing the company to outsource much of its hiring tasks to the university career center. CPPs are a feature found predominantly, though not exclusively, on campuses where there is a highly rationalized logic around the economic benefits of academic science. Further, CPPs represent a commercialization of practice that is in tension with the student-development mission of traditional career counselors. Using an inhabited institutionalist approach, we show how the models differ and how staff on each side attempt to negotiate their competing roles in the multiversity environment. We also discuss some of the potential impact on students, on the career services profession, and on college-to-work pathways.

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Article
Publication date: 4 January 2021

Yaoyi Zhou, Chiara Tagliaro and Ying Hua

In large organizations, space planning relies on workgroup leaders to indicate spatial adjacency preferences. However, many factors affect workgroups’ adjacency…

Abstract

Purpose

In large organizations, space planning relies on workgroup leaders to indicate spatial adjacency preferences. However, many factors affect workgroups’ adjacency preferences, and it is not clear how the choices are made. This paper aims to explore whether the adjacency preferences are influenced by the collaboration relationship or constrained by the organizational structure.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors studied a large company’s spatial adjacency planning with an in-depth analysis of its formal organizational structure and collaboration network. A sample of 183 managers was surveyed regarding groups with whom they want to be spatially adjacent and groups with whom they mostly interact. The data enabled us to test three structural factors related to adjacency preference: department affiliation, workgroup’s prestige and collaboration relation. The authors used the quadratic assignment procedure analysis to examine the correlations between network matrices.

Findings

The results suggest that department affiliation and collaboration relations are significantly correlated to adjacency preferences. The authors did not find evidence supporting the notion that a workgroup’s prestige affects the preference. Among the three factors, collaboration relation best predicts the preference, which echoes Pena et al.’s (1977) argument that space planners should look into how groups function, rather than merely following the organizational chart.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this research was the first to explore the choice of spatially adjacent workgroup through a detailed network analysis of the formal structure, work collaboration relations and other group-level characteristics. The findings have noteworthy cross-disciplinary implications, given that spatial proximity can be taken as a human resource management strategy to facilitate the overall interactions between workgroups.

Details

Journal of Corporate Real Estate , vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-001X

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