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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Susan Clayton

Provides insight into one university library's experience in delivering library instruction to off‐campus students in the School of Business and the School of Education…

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Abstract

Provides insight into one university library's experience in delivering library instruction to off‐campus students in the School of Business and the School of Education while also exploring such issues as library instruction for graduate students, face‐to‐face instruction at off‐campus centers, uses of technology, faculty interaction, student needs, and librarian logistics. Examines the literature on this topic, to: review the current services offered to off‐campus students, review how the off‐campus library instruction takes place, discuss developments for the future, and present recommendations for improving the service. Finds that, at the University of Redlands, off‐campus library services are experiencing a time of growth. A goal of the library and the University to provide personalized library instruction to graduate students is gradually being realized. The off‐campus students are beginning to receive services equal to library services received by on‐campus students. Proposes that this study could be used to assist other colleges and universities in developing a program for library instruction for off‐campus students.

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Reference Services Review, vol. 32 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1998

Max L. Bromley and Brian A. Reaves

At present there is little comparative information available regarding campus and municipal police agencies and their personnel. Therefore, the purpose of the present…

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948

Abstract

At present there is little comparative information available regarding campus and municipal police agencies and their personnel. Therefore, the purpose of the present study is to examine the similarities and differences between municipal and campus police agencies with respect to various human resource characteristics and policies. The following research question guided the analysis: how do municipal and campus police agencies compare regarding the following human resource characteristics and policies: the proportion of sworn personnel, gender and race of sworn officers, salaries and benefits, educational requirements, levels of training required, drug testing policies and the extent of collective bargaining/unionization. The database is nationwide in scope. The findings of this study support the general notion that city and campus police departments are similar at least with respect to the human resource characteristics identified. Many campus departments have advanced well beyond the watchman era of campus policing. In a number of human resource areas such as use of civilians, education and training requirements, the campus police have progressed very well based on the comparisons made.

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Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

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Article
Publication date: 10 February 2012

Hal Mendelsohn

The Campus Connections Program can help provide other universities with a better method to reach out to students so they can learn what resources are available to them on…

Abstract

Purpose

The Campus Connections Program can help provide other universities with a better method to reach out to students so they can learn what resources are available to them on their university campus. This paper aims to examine how it does this.

Design/methodology/approach

An investigation was performed to find out what services were on the University of Central Florida's campus. Determining that many of the necessary resources were not being promoted to the students, the Campus Connections Program was developed. A review of relevant literature highlighted the point that partnerships/working relationships are important to perform successful outreach to those you wish to contact.

Findings

Through a survey instrument, it was concluded that a better way of reaching out to students was necessary. There are other outlets used to promote an organization's services, the difference shows that the Campus Connections Program provided a better forum for the exchange of information.

Research limitations/implications

A survey of nine questions was administered to representatives who participated in the Campus Connections Program. The survey sought to determine if the established method of reaching out to students was useful.

Originality/value

Student orientations are the normal route groups take to meet students and discuss their services. Providing the time and location within the library for those same groups to meet the students individually, is what makes the Campus Connections Program unique.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 40 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 7 July 2014

Matthew Little and Eugene Cordero

This paper aims to investigate the relationship between hybrid classes (where a per cent of the class meetings are online) and transportation-related CO2 emissions at a…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the relationship between hybrid classes (where a per cent of the class meetings are online) and transportation-related CO2 emissions at a commuter campus similar to San José State University (SJSU).

Design/methodology/approach

A computer model was developed to calculate the number of trips to campus for a student body similar to SJSU. Different scenarios considered the theoretical effectiveness of implementing a hybrid course system to reduce CO2 emissions.

Findings

Increases in hybrid courses resulted in decreased student trips to campus and associated CO2 emissions. The utility of such a relationship is demonstrated through a case study where the required increase in online class meetings needed to eliminate the need for an overflow parking lot is studied. Finally, preferential scheduling of online meetings can further reduce trips to campus.

Research limitations/implications

A limitation of the model is that student schedules are random. Future research could use actual student schedules to better model how online course delivery will affect trips to campus.

Practical implications

As today’s universities struggle with financial pressure, online course delivery is being offered as a way to cope. This analysis provides an additional metric to evaluate online courses and includes other potential financial savings.

Social implications

Transportation contributes to local air pollution and emissions of heat-trapping gases. As universities move toward more sustainable behaviors, reducing automobile trips to campus can be seen as a priority.

Originality/value

To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first attempt to model the relationship between hybrid courses and CO2 emissions at an urban university. This information will be valuable to the SJSU community, as well as many other institutions.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Article
Publication date: 30 December 2021

Bifeng Zhu, Gebing Liu and Jing Feng

This paper aims to make a comparative study on the latest version of green campus evaluation standard between China and America: Green Campus Evaluation Standard…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to make a comparative study on the latest version of green campus evaluation standard between China and America: Green Campus Evaluation Standard (GB/T51356-2019) and the sustainability tracking, assessment and rating system (STARS 2.2). The differences of evaluation methods and contents are analyzed and their respective characteristics and advantages are sorted out, so as to promote the development of sustainable campus evaluation standards.

Design/methodology/approach

The research mainly adopts the method of comparative study, which is carried out from three dimensions, namely, the related policies development of campus construction and world university sustainable rankings; the content of evaluation standards (including evaluation methods and evaluation categories and scores); the characteristics and current application of standards.

Findings

There are great differences between the evaluation standards of China and America in organization and participation mode, evaluation method and content. Public engagement, energy and campus engagement are the hot spots. Buildings, energy, food and dining and investment and finance will become the focus of sustainable campus in the future. Specific optimization strategies of key points, evaluation method and content and organization and participation mode of Chinese standard are put forward.

Practical implications

This paper clarifies the advantages and disadvantages of the current global sustainable campus, and provides the basis for the next stage of construction policy. At the same time, it is helpful for all countries, especially China, to formulate construction guidelines that not only meet their own actual needs but also conform to the trend of global sustainable campus development.

Social implications

The connotation of sustainable campus is enriched, and the evaluation standards of sustainable campus are improved. The development of sustainable campus is promoted, so as to realize the sustainable development goals.

Originality/value

This research expands the scope of the study to the whole campus, rather than just one aspect of campus buildings. It compares the evaluation standard of green campus in China with STARS in the USA, and no longer compares leadership in energy and environmental design for schools. It discusses the campus building’s energy conservation while paying attention to the campus green consciousness, green management and green planning. Based on the relevant data currently used by STARS in the global evaluation, this paper analyzes the hot spots and shortcomings of the current global sustainable campus construction and puts forward some optimization suggestions for China’s green campus evaluation system.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Article
Publication date: 22 November 2021

Sherah L. Basham

The purpose of this paper is to examine the extent to which community policing within campus law enforcement agencies is influenced by the organizational structure, agency…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the extent to which community policing within campus law enforcement agencies is influenced by the organizational structure, agency characteristics and campus characteristics.

Design/methodology/approach

This study utilizes ordinary least squares regression modeling to examine community policing implementation. Data were drawn from a sample of 242 US colleges and universities included in the 2011–2012 Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) Survey of Campus Law Enforcement Agencies (SCLEA).

Findings

Findings show that within-campus law enforcement agencies, greater levels of community policing are associated with more formalization, larger numbers of employees, a higher task scope and higher rates of on-campus property crime.

Research limitations/implications

Use of secondary data and reported crime rate limits the study. Future research should implement specialized surveys and qualitative methods to identify the specific needs and implementations of community policing.

Originality/value

This paper adds to the limited body of literature on the community policing in campus law enforcement through more recent data and the inclusion of campus community variables.

Details

Policing: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

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Book part
Publication date: 5 February 2016

Daniel Davis and Amy Binder

This study documents a new case of the further commercialization of the university, the rapid adoption of corporate partnership programs (CPPs) within centralized…

Abstract

This study documents a new case of the further commercialization of the university, the rapid adoption of corporate partnership programs (CPPs) within centralized university career services departments. CPPs function as a type of headhunting agency. For an annual fee they facilitate a corporate hiring department’s direct access to student talent, allowing the company to outsource much of its hiring tasks to the university career center. CPPs are a feature found predominantly, though not exclusively, on campuses where there is a highly rationalized logic around the economic benefits of academic science. Further, CPPs represent a commercialization of practice that is in tension with the student-development mission of traditional career counselors. Using an inhabited institutionalist approach, we show how the models differ and how staff on each side attempt to negotiate their competing roles in the multiversity environment. We also discuss some of the potential impact on students, on the career services profession, and on college-to-work pathways.

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Book part
Publication date: 16 September 2013

Betina Gardner, Trenia L. Napier and Russell G. Carpenter

Utilizing creative campus partnerships, alliances, and mergers, libraries can move from a traditional support role to a more participatory role that actively engages a…

Abstract

Utilizing creative campus partnerships, alliances, and mergers, libraries can move from a traditional support role to a more participatory role that actively engages a university’s academic mission. Libraries, as centralizing, politically neutral hubs for information, can serve as catalysts for collaborative planning that paves the way for creating innovative campus spaces and services in conjunction with other academic or general campus units. By forging alliances and merging services and resources with campus partners, such as Information Technology (IT) and the English and Communication departments, the library can address student need and initiate transformational changes—changes that are broader in scope than those within traditional library functions. The case study in this chapter provides an exploration of the merging of library services with a writing center, an effort which was enhanced by adding an oral communication support service. It provides examples of what can be accomplished through visionary leadership and teamwork in 21st-century academic libraries, focusing on how student need and library use prompted institutional change at a mid-sized regional comprehensive university. The authors highlight the essential structural and operational mergers and alliances involved in integrating existing and developing library and campus initiatives to create a unique integrated service point for research, writing, and oral communication in the heart of the university’s main library. The case study also identifies continued partnership and collaboration, and briefly outlines methods through which libraries might initiate similar transformational changes and mergers at their own institutions, serving as a model for similar alliances in other settings.

Details

Mergers and Alliances: The Operational View and Cases
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-054-3

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Book part
Publication date: 21 May 2018

Chris Linder

Abstract

Details

Sexual Violence on Campus
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-229-1

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Article
Publication date: 8 July 2021

Larissa Sue Christensen and Natalie Elizabeth Nilsen

Through using a realist approach, this study aims to identify the key moderators of multi-campus effectiveness through a systematic literature review, with a focus on…

Abstract

Purpose

Through using a realist approach, this study aims to identify the key moderators of multi-campus effectiveness through a systematic literature review, with a focus on faculty staff and student satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

Following preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses guidelines, information from peer-reviewed journal papers relating to multi-campus universities was located. The systematic search spanned a 10 year period (2009 to 2019) and returned 538 results. After duplicates were removed, and titles, abstracts and full-texts were screened, 14 papers matched the eligibility criteria.

Findings

Four key moderators were identified through the thematic analysis: inconsistent technology, hesitation to innovate, geographical separation of staff and geographical separation of students.

Originality/value

By exploring the moderators, the study provides policy and practice professionals in higher education with a complex understanding of the key contexts that can hinder the success of staff and student satisfaction at multi-campus universities. To enhance the tangibility of the current review, the study concludes with practical steps forward for enhancing staff and student satisfaction at multi-campus universities.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 29 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

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