Search results

1 – 10 of over 5000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 15 August 2016

Petru Lucian Curseu, Sandra G. L. Schruijer and Oana Catalina Fodor

The purpose of this paper is to test the influence of collaborative and consultative decision rules on groups’ sensitivity to framing effect (FE) and escalation of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test the influence of collaborative and consultative decision rules on groups’ sensitivity to framing effect (FE) and escalation of commitment (EOC).

Design/methodology/approach

In an experimental study (using a sample of 233 professionals with project management experience), the authors test the effects of collaborative and consultative decision rules on groups’ sensitivity to EOC and FE. The authors use four group decision-making tasks to evaluate decision consistency across gain/loss framed decision situations and six decision tasks to evaluate EOC for money as well as time as resources previously invested in the initial decisions.

Findings

The results show that the collaborative decision rule increases sensitivity to EOC when financial resources are involved and decreases sensitivity to EOC when time is of essence. Moreover, the authors show that the collaborative decision rule decreases sensitivity to FE in group decision making.

Research limitations/implications

The results have important implications for group rationality as an emergent group level competence by extending the insights concerning the impact of decision rules on emergent group level cognitive competencies. Due to the experimental nature of the design, the authors can probe the causal relations between the investigated variables, yet the authors cannot generalize the results to other settings.

Practical implications

Managers can use the insights of this study in order to optimize the functioning of decision-making groups and to reduce their sensitivity to FEs and EOC.

Originality/value

The study extends the research on group rationality and it is one of the few experimental attempts used to understand the role of decision rules on emergent group level rationality.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 54 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 1994

Lawson K. Savery

Suggests that, owing to changes in the business environment, leadershiprather than management is needed. Proposes, also, that a co‐operativerelationship between the…

Abstract

Suggests that, owing to changes in the business environment, leadership rather than management is needed. Proposes, also, that a co‐operative relationship between the management and the workforce should be encouraged. Posits that there is a relationship between perceived and preferred styles of leadership which affects job tenure. Presents the results of a questionnaire on the preferred and perceived styles of leadership which was carried out at a Western Australian State headquarters of a Federal statutory body. Concludes that the democratic style of leadership leads to a more positive organizational commitment from the individual and also higher job satisfaction. Suggests, therefore, that managers should made as much as they possibly can.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

Marcus Selart

The study aims at clarifying whether locus of control may act as a bias in organisational decision‐making or not.

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims at clarifying whether locus of control may act as a bias in organisational decision‐making or not.

Design/methodology/approach

Altogether 44 managers working at Skanska (a Swedish multinational construction company) participated in the study. They were asked to complete a booklet including a locus of control test and a couple of decision tasks. The latter were based on case scenarios reflecting strategic issues relevant for consultative/participative decision‐making.

Findings

The results revealed that managers with low external locus of control used group consultative decision‐making more frequently than those with high locus of control. There was also a tendency showing that high externals more frequently used participative decision‐making than low externals. This was in line with the general trend, indicating that managers on the whole predominantly used participative decision‐making.

Originality/value

The results of the present study are valuable for HRM practice, especially with regard to the selection of individuals to management teams.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 43 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 November 1998

Anne Morris and Elizabeth Barron

The idea that user consultation is central to effectiveness, quality and efficiency is still relatively new in many public service organisations, including libraries. This…

Abstract

The idea that user consultation is central to effectiveness, quality and efficiency is still relatively new in many public service organisations, including libraries. This paper reviews the methods available and describes the results of a survey of all UK public library authorities to find out what methods they employ, their effectiveness, and in which context they are used. Recommendations are also made for improving user consultation within libraries.

Details

Library Management, vol. 19 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2000

John Crawford and Sarah Riley

This paper considers the assessment and enhancement of student feedback within a University Library context. It examines the assessment of the overall experience of the…

Abstract

This paper considers the assessment and enhancement of student feedback within a University Library context. It examines the assessment of the overall experience of the student of the university as a whole and the role that the library plays in that. Lessons can be learned from the article about the role of the information service in supporting the mission of the parent organisation.

Details

Performance Measurement and Metrics, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-8047

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 3 August 2008

Bradley Shrimpton, John McKie, Rosalind Hurworth, Catherine Bell and Jeff Richardson

Faced with an ageing population and newspaper warnings that escalating costs are leading to a health crisis, debate has intensified in Australia and elsewhere on the…

Abstract

Faced with an ageing population and newspaper warnings that escalating costs are leading to a health crisis, debate has intensified in Australia and elsewhere on the allocation of limited health resources. But whose values should inform decision‐making in the health area, and should the influence of different groups vary with the level of decision‐making? These questions were put to 54 members of the public and health professionals in eight focus groups. Unlike previous studies, participants were not asked if particular groups should be involved in decisions but rather through deliberation and discussion nominated their own potential decision‐makers. This delivered a clear message that participants saw a legitimate role for a broad range of stakeholders in priority‐setting decisions. The results suggest that qualitative methods of investigation have the potential to improve the legitimacy and accountability of policy decisions by contributing to a better understanding of the values of the public and health professionals.

Details

Qualitative Research Journal, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1443-9883

Keywords

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this chapter is to critically analyse multiple stakeholders’ self-perceptions of the value, nature, success and impact of core Aboriginal Studies subjects in primary teacher education university courses.

Methodology

Participants were drawn from two universities in New South Wales which taught a core Aboriginal Studies subject as part of their primary teacher education degree. The methodology was informed by Yin’s (2003) multiple-case study replication design. This replication presents a picture of the perceptions and events which have impacted on the participants in the study.

Findings

The findings have important implications for theory, research and practice. The results of this study demonstrate that core Aboriginal Studies subjects in primary teacher education courses can make a positive difference in changing the perceptions of many pre-service teachers about Aboriginal people.

Research implications

The purpose of this study was to assemble an evidence-based rationale, which includes the voices of multiple stakeholders, to test the extent to which core Aboriginal Studies subjects in primary teacher education courses are vital to improving educational outcomes for Aboriginal children, advancing reconciliation and creating a more socially just Australian society.

Implications

Undertaking professional training through a core Aboriginal Studies subject builds pre-service teachers’ self-concepts, attitudes, commitment, knowledge and skills, and ability and understandings to teach Aboriginal Studies, incorporate Aboriginal perspectives and to be committed to effectively teaching Aboriginal students.

Social implications

The study supports the need for the inclusion of core Aboriginal Studies subjects in all universities with teacher education courses.

Originality/value of the paper

Research on Indigenous students has mostly adopted a deficiency model. In contrast, this study takes an explicitly positive perspective on Indigenous student success by focusing on the active psychological ingredients that facilitate successful learning.

Details

Seeding Success in Indigenous Australian Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-686-6

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 31 December 2013

Ludovic Urgeghe

Purpose – These last three years, the global reputation of microfinance has been damaged by some major crises, notably in India. The Microfinance Investment Vehicles…

Abstract

Purpose – These last three years, the global reputation of microfinance has been damaged by some major crises, notably in India. The Microfinance Investment Vehicles (MIVs), funded by public money and socially inclined investors, are believed by observers to be part of the causes of the crises (von Stauffenberg & Rozas, 2011). As a consequence, they now have to demonstrate their commitment to the social mission of microfinance. This chapter aims at putting forward the debate on MIVs’ ability to effectively contribute to the social mission of microfinance by analyzing how they integrate social performance in their investment decisions.

Methodology/approach – Analysis of interviews with microfinance fund managers based on a framework of recognized impediments to a socially responsible approach in investing.

Findings – While social performance is recognized by respondents to be an important topic for the industry, fund managers still do not give a strong role to social criteria in investment decisions. The findings of the qualitative analysis in the chapter demonstrate that this is linked to a number of major impediments such as the tendency to believe that microfinance is social per se, the lack of standardization in social performance tools, and also a loose regulation regarding social reporting.

Research limitations/implications – The findings of the study are limited due to the relatively small sample size and the focus on fund managers’ answers only. Future research could investigate the viewpoints of different stakeholders in the investment process, such as the back investors of microfinance funds or the regulatory institutions.

Originality/value – To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt to get insights on the impediments to a stronger focus on social performance by MIVs, with the application of a recognized framework from the Socially Responsible Investment (SRI) literature.

Details

Institutional Investors’ Power to Change Corporate Behavior: International Perspectives
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-771-9

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 26 November 2020

Jacques Ninet

Abstract

Details

Negative Interest Rates
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-376-3

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 15 February 2013

Arshad Ali Javed, Patrick T.I. Lam and Patrick X.W. Zou

The purpose of this paper is to focus on the challenges faced by the public and private sectors in developing output specifications for Australian public private…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on the challenges faced by the public and private sectors in developing output specifications for Australian public private partnership (PPP) projects. In particular, this study aims to examine how the stakeholders (including facilities managers) should cater for future changes in output specifications and make them flexible enough to meet the evolving project objectives.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is based on 19 semi‐structured interviews with key stakeholders from the public and private sectors in three States of Australia where PPP procurement has been used, including New South Wales (NSW), Queensland and Victoria. The results are triangulated with relevant literature for supports and contrasts.

Findings

For PPP projects, a good set of output specifications is conducive to the achievement of value for money, innovation, risk transfer, whole life asset performance through a clear abatement regime and an effective linkage of performance criteria to the payment mechanism. For existing specifications, it was found that too many and complex KPIs were specified, which were difficult to monitor, measure and implement by the client. Very prescriptive specifications hindered innovations and did not allow appropriate risk allocation. Further, the research study suggests that after the global financial crises, the private sector had less appetite to take the patronage risks in road and rail PPP projects. To mitigate these pitfalls, it is imperative that output specifications need to be aligned with the type of PPP projects they represent; in particular foreseeable changes should be addressed by some pre‐agreed framework to facilitate negotiation.

Originality/value

The significant contribution of this research is the identification of the common issues faced in drafting output specifications for Australian PPP projects. Stakeholders of future PPP projects should find the lessons useful for achieving value for money and appropriate risk transfer, stating the user requirements through clear and concise output specifications rather than input or prescriptive specifications in procuring social and economical PPP projects. Their relationships with facilities management are highlighted.

1 – 10 of over 5000