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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2010

Pascale Benoliel and Anit Somech

This study seeks to explore the moderating role of teachers' personality traits from the Big Five typology on the relationship between participative management and teacher…

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Abstract

Purpose

This study seeks to explore the moderating role of teachers' personality traits from the Big Five typology on the relationship between participative management and teacher outcomes with respect to performance, satisfaction and strain. The study suggests that participative management may produce different results depending on teachers' personality factors.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from a survey of 153 elementary school teachers and their principals in Northern and Central Israel. Teachers were asked to complete questionnaires about participative management, workplace satisfaction and strain, as well as to fill in the Big Five personality questionnaire. Teacher performance was evaluated by the school principal.

Findings

Hierarchical regression analyses show that the personality dimensions of extroversion, agreeableness, conscientiousness and neuroticism served as moderators of the relation between participative management and teacher performance, satisfaction and strain. However, openness to experience was not found to have a moderating impact on those relations.

Originality/value

Many educational research studies have emphasized the benefits of participative management practices for school organizations and teachers, while ignoring the potential negative impact of teacher participation in the decision‐making process. The present study contributes to understanding and predicting the impact of participative management on teachers in particular and on school organization effectiveness in general. From the practical perspective, this research points to the necessity of including personality factors to better understand the impact of participative management on teacher outcomes and indicates that participative management may not suit all teachers.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 48 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2012

Manuela Pardo‐del‐Val, Clara Martínez‐Fuentes and Salvador Roig‐Dobón

This paper aims to deal with the influence of a participatory management style along a change process, specifically in seeking to analyze the effect of participative

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9746

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to deal with the influence of a participatory management style along a change process, specifically in seeking to analyze the effect of participative management style on resistance to change and its effects on change performance.

Design/methodology/approach

After a revision of previous literature, an empirical research is presented to test the existence and signs of the relationships between participation and organizational change. To measure the main concepts, the authors have used scales and other measures already published and through a correlation analysis gain some insight into the relationships among variables.

Findings

Data suggest that participative management might be giving the members of the organization the necessary tools to question aspects that could endanger changes, thus considering participation as a knowledge broker that sheds light along the change process through the increase of resistance to change sources.

Research limitations/implications

The main limitation is the reduced sample, as well as the fact that answers are provided by a single respondent.

Practical implications

This research might help practitioners to look at resistance to change from a positive point of view, therefore, participation might be considered a tool to show potential weaknesses and help change agents to improve change outcomes.

Originality/value

The paper supports the literature that considers resistance to change positively. Moreover, it provides some hints as to what kind of sources of resistance to change are more important depending on the typology of the change itself.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 50 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 10 January 2020

Patrick Lo and Andrew Stark

The purpose of this paper is to analyse managerial approaches of a selective group of national library directors, examining their views and perceptions of successful…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse managerial approaches of a selective group of national library directors, examining their views and perceptions of successful library leadership in the twenty-first century in different sociocultural contexts. This study was carried out based on a series of semi-structured interviews with ten top-level directors of national libraries located on different continents.

Design/methodology/approach

The data collection method for this study consisted of the narrative analysis of the ten interviews coupled with the participative leadership theory, which highlights the leaders’ desire to create a more democratic culture within their library organisations.

Findings

The analysis of these interviews reveals that many of the directors’ responses were supportive to the concepts discussed in participative leadership. National librarians, through their participative leadership philosophies, values and beliefs, contributed to the development of an institutional culture that fostered improving trust, communications, engagement as well as promotion of inter-team relationships by breaking down the traditional “hierarchical” barriers within their organisations.

Research limitations/implications

The participants were predominantly from Europe; only one participant represented the USA, Middle East (Israel) and Northern Africa (Egypt). As a result, there are not many diverse viewpoints from national library directors outside of Europe. Further studies would be needed to obtain a more international perspective in the national library sphere. Furthermore, this study only examines the views and attitudes of ten different library directors. In comparison with the totality of national library directors across the world, this is a relatively small sample. This study may not be representative of all national library directors around the world.

Originality/value

The results of this study would be of interest to library professionals and educators interested in management, as well as Library and Information Science students who want to understand how national library directors view successful traits of participative leadership in different sociocultural contexts.

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Article
Publication date: 17 August 2015

Johanna Sax and Simon S. Torp

The purpose of this paper is to test the effect of psychological safety and participative leadership style on risk performance as well as its interaction with enterprise…

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4051

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test the effect of psychological safety and participative leadership style on risk performance as well as its interaction with enterprise risk management (ERM) processes to evaluate if a decentralisation in the form of a safe environment and participative leadership style enhances or crowds out the effect of a centralised-ERM process.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a survey among top-500 Danish companies, the paper tests in SEM the relationships between ERM, participative leadership style and psychological safety on risk performance

Findings

The paper finds that not only do both ERM and participative leadership style enhance risk performance but a positive interaction effect is also found. In addition, the findings suggest that a safe environment precede participative leadership style indicating this as a prerequisite for management to introduce participative leadership style. These findings underpin that an effective risk management system should include both a holistic, formalised ERM system and organisational initiatives that enhance a strategic responsiveness through employee involvement.

Originality/value

The current study provides new empirical insights about the effect of a formal ERM process on risk performance as well as cultural factors for ERM success. As something new to the risk management literature, it draws on leadership and employee voice theory and investigates participative leadership style and psychological safety for employee voice as contextual influences on the effect of a formal ERM process on risk performance.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 53 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1999

Gerrida J. Oosthuizen and Adeline S.A. du Toit

Participative management is based on the assumption that empowering people throughout the enterprise will result in a more responsive, more flexible, and ultimately more…

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2279

Abstract

Participative management is based on the assumption that empowering people throughout the enterprise will result in a more responsive, more flexible, and ultimately more successful enterprise. Participative management is more than a willingness to share influence ‐ formal patterns of participation need to be truly implemented where employees have a right to contribute on all levels of decision‐making. The empirical survey showed that participative management is applied at academic information services in the Gauteng province of South Africa, but more so in low‐level decisions. This indicates that participation is still limited and controlled by management and is not yet experienced as a right by employees.

Details

Library Management, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1992

M.R. Ali, A. Khaleque and M. Hossain

Investigates the attitudes of managers, supervisors and workers toparticipative management and identifies obstacles to implement it inBangladesh: 306 employees, 181…

Abstract

Investigates the attitudes of managers, supervisors and workers to participative management and identifies obstacles to implement it in Bangladesh: 306 employees, 181 workers, 73 supervisors, and 52 managers, from eight medium‐sized industrial plants were interviewed by using a questionnaire. The results showed that workers expressed more positive attitudes than managers and supervisors. Supervisors expressed more favourable attitudes than managers. Managers expressed a lukewarm support to participation. Both workers and supervisors perceived certain organizational situations as barriers to participation. Managers did not perceive these situations as barriers. The implication is that a participative management system is likely to meet with resistance from managers, while workers and supervisors will support it. It is therefore suggested that training and educational interventional programmes should be introduced to change the attitudes of managers.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 19 March 2021

Amy K.B. Paros

The purpose of this study was to understand if productivity and turnover of the female millennial knowledge workers was influenced by participative management theory…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to understand if productivity and turnover of the female millennial knowledge workers was influenced by participative management theory. Developing a greater understanding for maximizing the productivity and minimizing turnover risks associated with the significant population of female millennial knowledge workers could contribute towards business success.

Design/methodology/approach

This qualitative embedded single-case study used triangulation to develop a more complete look at the female millennial knowledge worker within an organization while utilizing a method that allowed for maximizing the understanding of a common case.

Findings

While triangulating across three modes of data collection “employee development” was identified in connection with both productivity and turnover. “Timely communication” was associated with productivity, and both “feedback” and “working environment” triangulated with turnover.

Research limitations/implications

This study extends existing participative management theory, limited by a majority focus, to include the female millennial knowledge worker.

Practical implications

The results of this study showed that managers should provide development opportunities and timely feedback to female millennial knowledge workers in support of their productivity. In addition, employee development, timely feedback and a positive work environment could be used by managers to minimize turnover in this population.

Originality/value

The risk of alienating the population of female millennial knowledge workers could result in turnover and productivity challenges for businesses. The results of this study showed that managers should engage in employee development, timely feedback and cultivate a positive work environment to minimize turnover and increase the productivity of this population.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 42 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1988

Susan Albers Mohrman and Edward E. Lawler

Managerial behavior has typically not been the lead variable in organizational change efforts. Change efforts have assumed that structure, strategy and work design changes…

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1399

Abstract

Managerial behavior has typically not been the lead variable in organizational change efforts. Change efforts have assumed that structure, strategy and work design changes will lead to new supervisory behaviors. The kinds of behaviors that are required of a manager in a high involvement organization are examined. It is suggested that managerial behavior is the primary change that is required to make a transition to a high involvement culture, and that it might be a suitable lead variable in the change sequence.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Hanna Janetzke and Michael Ertel

Although efforts have been made to specify the concept and the process of psychosocial risk management (PSRM), there is still a lack of knowledge on overcoming initiation…

Abstract

Purpose

Although efforts have been made to specify the concept and the process of psychosocial risk management (PSRM), there is still a lack of knowledge on overcoming initiation and implementation barriers. The purpose of this paper is to explore how PSRM was implemented in different work contexts (under difficult and favourable conditions concerning the extent of management’s commitment and participative practices). Success factors are derived from the different work contexts.

Design/methodology/approach

This study compares PSRM approaches across organizations in four European countries. A total of 41 interviews with 60 organizational stakeholders were carried out and supplemented with a corporate documents analysis. Commonalities and differences within and between ten organizational case studies were analysed from which good practice and lessons learnt could be extracted.

Findings

The authors found different approaches based on the extent to which organizational capacity (management commitment and participative practices to prevent psychosocial risks) was taken into account. Where capacity was restricted, external support was necessary to initiate and to implement the process. Where capacity was high, integration of PSRM into routine processes and connection with already existing processes was a dominating topic.

Originality/value

Currently, enabling and hindering factors are not systematically prioritized according to the specific context in which PSRM takes place and often they are not differentiated according to the level (e.g. personal, processual, structural and cultural) where they are situated. This study identifies PSRM versions at those different levels which can help in tailoring specific measures to the workplace conditions.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

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Article
Publication date: 4 September 2017

Pascale Benoliel and Anat Barth

As a result of continuous reforms, increased emphasis has been placed on participative leadership as a means to improving school and teacher outcomes. However, along with…

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2437

Abstract

Purpose

As a result of continuous reforms, increased emphasis has been placed on participative leadership as a means to improving school and teacher outcomes. However, along with the benefits of participative leadership comes the potential for strain and burnout, which stem from work intensification. Applying the implicit leadership theory and the conservation of resources theory, the purpose of this paper is to propose that differences in school’s cultural attributes will influence the emergence of participative leaders and their influence on teachers’ outcomes of job satisfaction and burnout.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected by survey from a sample of 367 teachers in Israel.

Findings

First, the results of general linear model (GLM) analysis indicated significant differences in the teachers’ perceptions of participative leadership between schools characterized by different cultural attributes. Second, the results of GLM indicated significant differences in the effects of participative leadership on teacher burnout across schools characterized by different cultural attributes.

Originality/value

This study has implications for policies involving the design and implementation of leadership tools for school management. Although research has emphasized the relationship between stressful job conditions associated with shared decision making and teachers’ well-being and job satisfaction, the volume of comparative work in the educational field shedding light on the impact of school’s cultural attributes on this question is limited. This study may assist principals in making their schools both more effective and more responsive to teacher expectations.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 55 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Keywords

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