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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2021

Yanji Duan, John A. Aloysius and Diane A. Mollenkopf

Firms employ various forms of disclosure to demonstrate commitment to and involvement in sustainable supply chain management (SSCM) practices. This research provides…

Abstract

Purpose

Firms employ various forms of disclosure to demonstrate commitment to and involvement in sustainable supply chain management (SSCM) practices. This research provides guidance to firms employing framing strategies when communicating their SSCM with external stakeholders like consumers as part of their supply chain transparency efforts.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors employed a middle-range theorizing approach to understand the context of SSCM practices and mechanisms of variously framed communication methods to disclose sustainability information to consumers. The authors conducted two experiments in an e-waste recycling context, studying how sustainable information disclosed to consumers using attribute framing and goal framing can affect consumers' attitudes. The authors also examined the moderating role of consumers' environmental involvement.

Findings

Results suggest that when attribute framing is used, firms should avoid framing the attribute from a negative valence. When goal framing is used, messages with consequences stated as “avoid loss” yield the most substantial effect. Additionally, framing effects are more significant for consumers with higher-than-average environmental involvement.

Originality/value

The authors’ results contribute to the ongoing theorization of SSCM by providing contextual understanding of how to communicate sustainability information. Corroborating evidence from marketing, framing effects are found to be context specific, thereby elucidating the framing literature more fully to the SSCM context. The authors extend this literature by studying attribute framing and comparing the effectiveness of all possible goal framing combinations of valence and gain/loss perspective in the SSCM communication context.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 9 July 2021

Felix Septianto, Gavin Northey and Scott Weaven

This paperaims to investigate a novel expectation by examining how framing a company as its constituent members (members frame) versus an organization (organization frame

Abstract

Purpose

This paperaims to investigate a novel expectation by examining how framing a company as its constituent members (members frame) versus an organization (organization frame) can influence consumer evaluations of a product or service from this company.

Design/methodology/approach

Four studies were conducted examining the effectiveness of an organization (vs members) frame in a between-subjects experimental design (a pilot study, Studies 1a, 1b and 2). Study 2 also tested the moderating role of donation strategies (amount-focused vs frequency-focused).

Findings

Results show a members (vs organization) frame leads to a higher purchase likelihood of a product from a company engaging in corporate donations. Further, this framing effect is mediated by increased levels of consumers’ perceptions about how committed the company is to the cause and the emotion of moral elevation in response to the company’s corporate donations. Moreover, this effect is moderated when the company uses a frequency-based (vs amount-based) donation strategy.

Research limitations/implications

This research contributes to the literature on message framing by demonstrating how the same information about a company may lead to differential effects on consumer evaluations, depending on whether the company is framed as its constituent members versus an organization.

Practical implications

This paper presents significant managerial implications for small companies, in which the owner is the company, about how they can effectively communicate corporate donations to the consumers.

Originality/value

This research provides a novel perspective on how the same information about a company may lead to differential effects on consumer evaluations, particularly in the context of corporate donations.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 55 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 29 March 2021

Porismita Borah

The current study has three main purposes: (1) replicate results from prior framing effects studies on social media. To do so, the study examines the influence of news…

Abstract

Purpose

The current study has three main purposes: (1) replicate results from prior framing effects studies on social media. To do so, the study examines the influence of news frames (free speech vs. public order) on participants' attitudes toward an alt-right rally (2) expand prior research by examining the emotional reaction of participants to these frames and (3) probe the moderating effects of face-to-face heterogenous talk and heterogenous social media feeds.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing from theoretical concepts such as competitive framing, emotions and heterogeneity, the study uses a randomized online experiment. The study examines a conversation in a Twitter thread that includes both free speech and public order frames in the comments to the thread. The total number of participants was 275.

Findings

The results show that free speech versus public order frame did not impact attitudes of the participants toward the alt-right rally. Findings also show the significant main effects of free speech and public order frames and the interaction of exposure to heterogeneity on emotional reactions of outrage and anger toward the alt-right rally. These findings suggest that framing research needs to take social media features into consideration for a complete picture of framing effects on social media.

Originality/value

Using a classic framing effects experiment, the study includes variables relevant to social media discussions on Twitter and examined the moderating effects of heterogeneity on emotional reactions. In addition, one of the important methodological contributions of the current study are the framing manipulations for an externally valid experimental design.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 45 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

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Article
Publication date: 31 October 2008

Raj Arora

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effectiveness of price bundling and message framing on attitudes, intentions, and beliefs about attributes of teeth…

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4159

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effectiveness of price bundling and message framing on attitudes, intentions, and beliefs about attributes of teeth whitening products. Although each of these variables, message framing and price bundling, has been explored individually, few attempts have been made to investigate them jointly. This study is based on a full factorial design that allows for testing of interaction effects. Second, the market for whitening products is maturing, resulting in a target market that is gaining knowledge about these products. Thus, we use knowledge as a covariate in the above investigation to determine if the communication strategy should be changed as the product moves from introduction to maturity.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on a 2 × 2 factorial design with price bundling (bundle price – individual price) and framing (positive – negative). The setting for the study is a hypothetical brand name of teeth whitening products.

Findings

The results reveal a mixed picture with respect to effectiveness of pricing and framing on attitudes and intentions. The effect of price bundling is not significant on attitudes; it is significant on intentions. Framing has a greater impact on intentions than on attitudes. Nevertheless, the interaction effects are significant on both attitudes as well as intentions. Finally, the impact of knowledge as a covariate is significant.

Research limitations/implications

Caution is advised in extrapolating the results beyond the issues investigated in the study.

Practical implications

The findings help marketers in formulating effective marketing strategy using both price bundling and message framing strategies.

Originality/value

Although price bundling and message framing have been explored in marketing studies, the research is lacking on the combined effects of these two important variables. The findings show a significant interaction effect of pricing and framing on changing attitudes and intentions. Prior research recommends using negative framing. The present research shows that for bundle products, a positive framing approach is desirable.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 17 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2001

Irwin P. Levin, Gary J. Gaeth, Felicitas Evangelista, Gerald Albaum and Judy Schreiber

Cites the existence of information framing effects as an interesting phenomenon in the area of human judgements and decision‐making. Uses three distinct types of framing

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920

Abstract

Cites the existence of information framing effects as an interesting phenomenon in the area of human judgements and decision‐making. Uses three distinct types of framing effect and the hypothesis identified by Leven et al (1998). Studies the reliability of these effects across samples of subjects in the USA and Australia. Shows that, for two of the three types, attribute framing and risky choice framing, the effects were strong and almost identical in the two samples. Highlights a significant effect for the US sample, but not the Australian sample, for the third type, goal framing. Discusses results in terms of the reliability of the effects and their potential for revealing cross‐cultural differences in values.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2000

Richard Buda and Yong Zhang

Subjects (n = 200) received a detailed description of a product and were asked to rate their attitudes about this product. Presentation order, source credibility and…

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8535

Abstract

Subjects (n = 200) received a detailed description of a product and were asked to rate their attitudes about this product. Presentation order, source credibility and message framing were manipulated in a 2× 2× 2 completely crossed factorial design. Subjects who received a positively framed message rated product attitudes significantly greater than those subjects who received a negatively framed message. Also, significant differences in message framing effects were found for those subjects who received the framed message first in the nonexpert condition (credibility) and those subjects who received the framed message last in the expert condition. Findings are then discussed.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 25 September 2007

Raj Arora

This paper aims to investigate the effectiveness of message framing and source credibility on attitudes, intentions and beliefs about attributes of teeth whitening…

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3330

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the effectiveness of message framing and source credibility on attitudes, intentions and beliefs about attributes of teeth whitening products. Although each of these variables, message framing and credibility, has been explored individually, few attempts have been made to investigate them jointly. This study aims to base itself on a full factorial design that allows for testing of interaction effects. Similar investigations in marketing limit their inquiries primarily to attitudes and intentions as dependent variables. This study goes further in that it also aims to investigate the effect of framing and credibility on the salient attributes of products. Third, the market for whitening products is maturing, resulting in a target market that is gaining knowledge about these products. Thus, the paper seeks to use knowledge as a covariate in the above investigation to determine if the communication strategy should be changed as the product moves from introduction to maturity.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on a 2 × 2 factorial design with framing (positive‐negative) and credibility (high‐low). The setting for the study is a hypothetical brand name of teeth whitening products.

Findings

The results reveal that positive framing is more effective in changing attitudes and intentions. However, the effects of framing and credibility are significant in changing beliefs related to the product's attributes. Although the covariate knowledge is significant, the findings indicate that communication strategy need not change as the product moves from introduction to maturity.

Research limitations/implications

Caution is advised in extrapolating the results beyond the issues investigated in the study.

Practical implications

The findings help marketers in formulating effective strategies.

Originality/value

The focus of most research studies in marketing is on changing attitudes and intentions. This research also includes the change in beliefs regarding the attributes of the product. Prior research on framing is tilted towards the use of negative framing. The findings of this study suggest using positive or gain‐framed messages.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 16 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2012

Eyal Gamliel and Ram Herstein

Price deals are typically presented in “save” terms. However, prospect theory predicts that people will be more willing to waive a monetary gain than to lose the same…

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2669

Abstract

Purpose

Price deals are typically presented in “save” terms. However, prospect theory predicts that people will be more willing to waive a monetary gain than to lose the same amount of money. This study seeks to examine whether consumers would show more purchase intentions of a product offered in a price deal framed negatively (“lose if you don't purchase”) relative to the conventional positive frame (“save if you purchase”).

Design/methodology/approach

The purchase intentions of 189 participants, randomly assigned to either a positively or a negatively framed message, were examined. The participants' perceived monetary gain in the deal and their involvement in the issue were also measured.

Findings

Presented with a negative relative to positive frame, participants showed more purchase intentions of a product offered in a price deal, and perceived their monetary gain as higher. Highly involved and lowly involved participants exhibited similar framing effects.

Research limitations/implications

The findings regarding lowly involved participants are inconsistent with previous findings. Future research is needed to clarify whether the message framing effect interacts with involvement in predicting purchase intentions of a product offered in a price deal.

Practical implications

The theoretical explanation of the phenomenon presented in this study predicts that negative framing of messages will also be more effective in other consumer behaviour contexts.

Originality/value

This study is the first empirical demonstration of the effect of message framing on the effectiveness of price deal offers, suggesting that retailers should re‐examine their conventional presentation of price deal offers in terms of gains, and consider rephrasing them in terms of loss.

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Article
Publication date: 12 April 2013

Eyal Gamliel and Ram Herstein

Consumers frequently have to choose between products that differ in price and quality. This study aims to hypothesize that involvement would moderate the effect of message…

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1094

Abstract

Purpose

Consumers frequently have to choose between products that differ in price and quality. This study aims to hypothesize that involvement would moderate the effect of message framing on consumers' perceived monetary gain when considering cheaper products, as well as on product choice.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 238 participants were randomly assigned to either a positively or a negatively framed message, and either a high or low involvement condition.

Findings

The study finds that presented with a negative relative to positive frame, highly involved participants perceived a higher monetary gain when purchasing the cheaper product; no corresponding differences were found for low‐involved participants. Message framing did not affect either highly or low‐involved participants' product choice.

Research limitations/implications

Explanations for the results are offered and future research is suggested in order to determine whether the effect of message framing on the perceived monetary gain of highly involved consumers choosing cheaper products does affect their product choice.

Practical implications

If future research confirms this hypothesis, both retailers and highly involved consumers should consider the possible effect of message framing on the perceived monetary gain and on the choice between products that differ in price and quality.

Originality/value

This study is the first demonstration of the moderating effect of involvement on the effect of message framing on consumers' perceived monetary gain when choosing between products that differ in price and quality.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2014

William A. Kerler, A. Scott Fleming and Christopher D. Allport

The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of attribute frames and justifications on capital budgeting decisions and to examine whether the requirement to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of attribute frames and justifications on capital budgeting decisions and to examine whether the requirement to provide justification for a capital budgeting decision moderates the effect of attribute frames.

Methodology

One-hundred and eleven participants made a capital budgeting decision in an experimental case that manipulated the frame of the financial evidence provided and the requirement to provide a justification.

Findings

Results suggest that both attribute frames and justifications affect capital budgeting decisions but the requirement to provide justifications did not moderate the effect of attribute frames.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the capital budgeting literature by identifying two factors that may bias judgments. This study also contributes to the framing literature by examining one potential method of moderating framing effects – requiring justification for decisions.

Details

Advances in Management Accounting
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-632-3

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