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Article
Publication date: 29 April 2021

Chenghao Men, Lei Yue, Huo Weiwei, Bing Liu and Guangwei Li

Drawing on theories of social information processing and social identity, the authors explore how abusive supervision climate affects team creativity in a Chinese cultural…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on theories of social information processing and social identity, the authors explore how abusive supervision climate affects team creativity in a Chinese cultural context. The authors propose that this relation will be mediated by collective efficacy and group identification and moderated by task interdependence

Design/methodology/approach

The study conducted a confirmatory factor analysis and hierarchical regression to analyze the paired data from 67 research and development (R&D) teams involving 378 employees and employers in a Chinese cultural context.

Findings

Results demonstrate that abusive supervision climate was negatively related to team creativity, fully mediated by collective efficacy and group identification in a Chinese cultural context. In addition, task interdependence strengthened the positive relation between collective efficacy and team creativity, as well the positive relation between group identification and team creativity.

Originality/value

Although research has explored how abusive supervision climate influences individual creativity, few studies have investigated the relation between abusive supervision climate and team creativity in a Chinese cultural context. This study is one of the first to explore how abusive supervision climate affects team creativity in a Chinese cultural context and examine the moderating role of task interdependence in the relation between abusive supervision climate and team creativity.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2007

Kazem Chaharbaghi and Sandy Cripps

The purpose of the paper is to demonstrate ways in which collective creativity and individual creativity exist in an “and/both” rather than in an “either/or” relationship.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to demonstrate ways in which collective creativity and individual creativity exist in an “and/both” rather than in an “either/or” relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses and interrelates a number of dualities using “metalectics”, the principal task of which is to balance seemingly conflicting opposites by revealing them and locating them on their strengths.

Findings

Collective creativity, as a bridging metaphor, renders itself as an oxymoron, both literally and as an outcome: where individual and collective creativity are dichotomised, diversity is treated as a constraint, and collaboration is confused with coordination.

Research limitations/implications

An essential of creativity is deviancy, and that this has to be valued to bring about change.

Practical implications

Heterogeneous communities of practice should not be confused with homogenous communities of practice because this causes artificial dialogues that destroy the very creativity they claim to ignite.

Originality/value

The paper offers an alternative way of thinking, arguing for a move away from simplified, unbalanced perspectives of creativity that focus on one‐dimensionality and asymmetry.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 31 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Article
Publication date: 5 January 2015

Torild Alise W. Oddane

– The purpose of this paper is to explore the adequacy of the common individual creativity vs organizatonal innovation dichotomy in a complex real-life context.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the adequacy of the common individual creativity vs organizatonal innovation dichotomy in a complex real-life context.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on a retrospective case study of a R&D project in a large industrial company.

Findings

The paper shows that understanding the relationship between creativity and innovation as a matter of individual creativity followed by subsequent collective innovation, fails to account for the inherent collective, and improvisational nature of innovation projects. To deal with this weakness, the paper proposes a reconceptualization of the relationship in terms of a capacity/activity distinction which views creativity as an individual and collective integral part of the complex innovation activity.

Research limitations/implications

This paper does not discuss challenges regarding collaboration between people representing a variety of expertise, interests, and organizational belongings.

Practical implications

The paper points out that continuous collective creativity is more important than initial individual creativity in complex real-life projects. The paper provides specific examples of work forms and approaches encouraging the collective creativity of researchers and practitioners in an innovation project. The work forms and approaches show how people continually deal with complexity, uncertainty and “the unexpected.” As such, the paper may be valuable to managers of complex real life-projects involving people with a great variety of expertise.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to a reconceptualization of the relationship between creativity and innovation which forms a contrast to the most common ways to distinquish between the phenomena. The capacity/activity distinction reflects the common assumption of a close relationship between creativity and innovation, but does not restrict creativity to the individual level or initial stage of innovation projects only. As such, the reconceptualization of the relationship between creativity and innovation can form the basis for practice-based theories in project management.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

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Article
Publication date: 4 June 2010

Christèle Boulaire, Guillaume Hervet and Raoul Graf

The purpose of this paper is to analyse how individual creativity of internet users is expressed in the production of online music videos and how the creative dynamic…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse how individual creativity of internet users is expressed in the production of online music videos and how the creative dynamic among amateur internet video producers can be characterized.

Design/methodology/approach

The researchers became readers and authors in the aim of providing the academic community with a scholarly narrative of creative YouTube video production. To develop their narrative, they explored the narrative woods that have grown up on the other side of the monitor screen in the form of videos inspired by one song.

Findings

The collective creative force is shown not to be expressed merely through the semantic and non‐semantic montages that make internet users into postmodern tinkerers, but also through such mechanisms as imitation, diversification and ornamentation. This force and these mechanisms give rise to chains that link and connect individual minds, imaginations, interests, enthusiasms, talents, abilities and skills.

Practical implications

As part of a relationship, or even a “conversation” to be initiated, sustained, and maintained on behalf of an industry organization, or brand with its consumers, the authors believe that the way to deal with digital participatory culture and the creative force manifested in innovation communities is to capitalize on these creative chains as judiciously as possible.

Originality/value

The authors suggest that this process should be part of a high‐impact interactive marketing strategy likely to promote (self‐) enchantment and foster loyalty among community members through (self‐) enchantment, particularly via the coproduction of a story, with community members creating the scripts.

Details

Journal of Research in Interactive Marketing, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7122

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Article
Publication date: 15 August 2016

Arménio Rego, Dálcio Reis Júnior, Miguel Pina e Cunha and Gabriel Stallbaum

The purpose of the paper is to test whether retail stores’ creativity predicts several indicators of performance through stores’ potency.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to test whether retail stores’ creativity predicts several indicators of performance through stores’ potency.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 45 stores (n = 317 employees) of a Brazilian retail chain was included, and a group/store level of analysis was adopted. Performance was measured through objective measures. To reduce the risks of common method variance, group creativity and group potency were measured with data from different store members.

Findings

The findings show that store creativity predicts indicators of store performance through store potency.

Research limitations/implications

The study was carried out within a single organization, and the stores’ sample is small. Other causalities are plausible, and future studies should adopt a longitudinal design to test reciprocal effects between the variables of the study.

Practical implications

Cultivating creativity (via the selection of creative individuals and nurturing contextual conditions that encourage creativity) may have at least indirect effects on store performance.

Originality/value

While the few empirical studies relating group creativity (still an under-researched topic) and performance have mostly used subjective performance measures, this study uses objective measures.

Details

Management Research: Journal of the Iberoamerican Academy of Management, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1536-5433

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 22 November 2019

Xanthippi Tsortanidou, Thanasis Daradoumis and Elena Barberá

This paper aims to present a novel pedagogical model that aims at bridging creativity with computational thinking (CT) and new media literacy skills at low-technology…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present a novel pedagogical model that aims at bridging creativity with computational thinking (CT) and new media literacy skills at low-technology, information-rich learning environments. As creativity, problem solving and collaboration are among the targeted skills in twenty-first century, this model promotes the acquisition of these skills towards a holistic development of students in primary and secondary school settings. In this direction, teaching students to think like a computer scientist, an economist, a physicist or an artist can be achieved through CT practices, as well as media arts practices. The interface between these practices is imagination, a fundamental concept in the model. Imaginative teaching methods, computer science unplugged approach and low-technology prototyping method are used to develop creativity, CT, collaboration and new media literacy skills in students. Furthermore, cognitive, emotional, physical and social abilities are fostered. Principles and guidelines for the implementation of the model in classrooms are provided by following the design thinking process as a methodological tool, and a real example implemented in a primary school classroom is described. The added value of this paper is that it proposes a pedagogical model that can serve as a pool of pedagogical approaches implemented in various disciplines and grades, as CT curriculum frameworks for K-6 are still in their infancy. Further research is needed to define the point at which unplugged approach should be replaced or even combined with plugged-in approach and how this proposed model can be enriched.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents a pedagogical model that aims at bridging creativity with CT, collaboration and new media literacy skills.

Findings

The proposed model follows a pedagogy-driven approach rather a technology-driven one as the authors suggest its implementation in low-tech, information-rich learning environments without computers. The added value of this paper is that it proposes a novel pedagogical model that can serve as a pool of pedagogical approaches and as a framework implemented in various disciplines and grades. A CT curriculum framework for K-6 is an area of research that is still in its infancy (Angeli et al., 2016), so this model is intended to provide a holistic perspective over this area by focusing how to approach the convergence among CT, collaboration and creativity skills in practice rather than what to teach. Based on literature, the authors explained how multiple moments impact on CT, creativity and collaboration development and presented the linkages among them. Successful implementation of CT requires not only computer science and mathematics but also imaginative capacities involving innovation and curiosity (The College Board, 2012). It is necessary to understand the CT implications for teaching and learning beyond the traditional applications on computer science and mathematics (Kotsopoulos et al., 2017) and start paying more attention to CT implications on social sciences and non-cognitive skills. Though the presented example (case study) seems to exploit the proposed multiple moments model at optimal level, empirical evidence is needed to show its practical applicability in a variety of contexts and not only in primary school settings. Future studies can extend, enrich or even alter some of its elements through experimental applications on how all these macro/micromoments work in practice in terms of easiness in implementation, flexibility, social orientation and skills improvement.

Originality/value

The added value of this paper is that it joins learning theories, pedagogical methods and necessary skills acquisition in an integrated manner by proposing a pedagogical model that can orient activities and educational scenarios by giving principles and guidelines for teaching practice.

Details

Information and Learning Sciences, vol. 120 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5348

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Article
Publication date: 30 September 2014

Victoria L. Rodner and Finola Kerrigan

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the importance of the field of visual arts marketing in the development of wider branding theory and practice. Drawing on…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the importance of the field of visual arts marketing in the development of wider branding theory and practice. Drawing on examples from visual artists and the art mechanism that connects them, the paper reveals how artists and art professionals foster various types of capital (social, cultural, symbolic) as a way of developing a brand name, ensuring longevity in the field, and gaining financial value on the market.

Design/methodology/approach

As a conceptual paper, the authors draw on a range of published works as well as examples from the world of visual arts in order to provide fresh theoretical insight into how branding in the arts may be applied to other industries.

Findings

The key findings are the importance of the consideration of the development and nurturing of social and cultural capital in developing brand identity. Additionally, visual art brands are required to be innovative and dynamic, and lessons learned regarding these processes have relevance for mainstream brands. The paper also found that creativity is often collective and that looking to methods for developing work in the visual arts can be utilised by brand managers more broadly in the age of social media and user generated content.

Originality/value

This paper follows on the developing body of work, which indicates what mainstream business can learn from looking at the visual arts. The paper highlights the collective nature of creativity in building the art brand as well as the importance of non-economic measures of value in the realm of branding.

Details

Arts Marketing: An International Journal, vol. 4 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-2084

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2012

Pierre Saulais and Jean‐Louis Ermine

Innovation within companies is becoming mandatory and vital. A policy of voluntarism aiming at supporting innovation can be based on an operational process managing the

Abstract

Purpose

Innovation within companies is becoming mandatory and vital. A policy of voluntarism aiming at supporting innovation can be based on an operational process managing the evolution of the firm's intellectual corpus, becoming a tool for innovation. This paper seeks to explain and demonstrate the link between knowledge management and innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

The fundamental assumption is to regard knowledge creation as an intellectual corpus evolution process, based on knowledge workers' creativity. Their creativity is stimulated by the critical analysis of the intellectual corpus, which leads to the creation of new technologic trajectories in continuity or divergence from existing trajectories. Based on a systemic model of intellectual capital, the analysis of the dynamic of knowledge has shown that the increase of value of intellectual capital may be described as an evolutionist process.

Findings

An experiment was conducted to validate the assumptions based on the analysis of the intellectual capital of a company, on the process of generating new items for the intellectual capital, on the regulation of this process by a community of knowledge workers and based on the integration of the results into the value chain of the organization.

Research limitations/implications

Based on interviews with experts about their inventive tracks during recent decades, the main limitations/difficulties come from making the inventory of the intellectual corpus of an organization.

Social implications

Social implications include an emphasis on the projection of experts' inventive tracks onto the knowledge map of the organization.

Originality/value

This paper links intellectual corpus and creativity: creation leads to intellectual property rights.

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Book part
Publication date: 3 July 2002

Elizabeth A Armstrong

This paper argues that actors are more likely to create new organizational forms in contexts of collective creativity. Contexts of collective creativity are characterized…

Abstract

This paper argues that actors are more likely to create new organizational forms in contexts of collective creativity. Contexts of collective creativity are characterized by intense interaction, uncertainty, and a multiplicity of available cultural materials. The context of collective creativity provided by the New Left made possible the creation of new kinds of lesbian/gay organizations in San Francisco in the early 1970s. The political upheaval of the 1960s enabled the creation of a new political logic, the logic of identity politics, which, in turn, made possible the development of the gay identity politics that structured contemporary lesbian/gay organizations.

Details

Social Structure and Organizations Revisited
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76230-872-9

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2015

Iris Annukka Humala

– This paper aims to better understand how to lead toward creativity in virtual work in a start-up context.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to better understand how to lead toward creativity in virtual work in a start-up context.

Design/methodology/approach

The study investigates the participants’ experiences about the learning challenges in leadership toward creativity in virtual work in a start-up company and the meanings attributed to their experiences, and the measures they see to meet those challenges. The data have been gathered on a Finnish partnership start-up company through interviews capturing peoples’ personal perspectives and experiences. This study uses a qualitative research study approach to better understand leadership toward creativity in virtual work in a start-up.

Findings

The results underline the importance of co-creative and assertive coaching leadership in a start-up to foster creativity and create new shared value. Key persons’ multiliteracy skills and lobbying are means to manage social and physical distances in virtual work.

Practical implications

The study suggests collaborative coaching leadership and assertiveness for start-ups to minimize mistakes in virtual work. Practitioners must unlearn old courses of action to learn to operate in a start-up environment and utilize information and communication technology in a smart way.

Originality/value

The paper gives empirical evidence in a start-up context about combining leadership and creativity within the virtual work research.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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