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1 – 10 of over 11000
Article
Publication date: 17 March 2022

Amina Talat, Shamila Nabi Khan, Sana Azar and Samra Chaudary

This research aims to examine the relationship between transactive memory systems and team sensemaking in the presence of critical boundary conditions, namely, task

Abstract

Purpose

This research aims to examine the relationship between transactive memory systems and team sensemaking in the presence of critical boundary conditions, namely, task conflict and reward interdependence.

Design/methodology/approach

The data for Study 1 was collected from 304 team members who worked in 87 organizations in the Information, Communication and Technology sector of Pakistan. Study 2 is based on team-level data that was collected from 180 teams working in the New Product Development sector, with four to seven members in each team. The data tested the three-way interaction effect of the transactive memory systems, task conflict and reward interdependence on team sensemaking.

Findings

Results have shown that transactive memory systems have a positive relationship with team sensemaking, particularly when both task conflict and reward interdependence were perceived to be high.

Practical implications

To reap synergies, human resource managers should avoid disrupting team structures, assigning new members to a team or rotating team members very frequently. Moreover, if a team is experiencing high task conflict, reward interdependence may encourage conflict to remain constructive.

Originality/value

The current study is one of the first few attempts that examine the pivotal role of task conflict and reward interdependence as boundary conditions on transactive memory systems and team sensemaking. This research, therefore, highlights the role of transactive memory systems in enhancing team sensemaking at higher levels of task conflict and reward interdependence.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 13 December 2004

Clement C. Chen and Keith T. Jones

Prior experimental budgeting research has focused primarily on individuals’ budget setting and little experimental research has examined budgeting in a group setting…

Abstract

Prior experimental budgeting research has focused primarily on individuals’ budget setting and little experimental research has examined budgeting in a group setting. Using a controlled experiment, this study extends prior participative budgeting research by examining the effects of aggregation levels of performance feedback and task interdependence on budgetary slack and the effects of different levels of feedback on group performance in a group participative budget setting.

The results suggest that aggregation levels of performance feedback differentially impact budgetary slack and group performance. Providing both group and individual performance feedback increases group performance and reduces budgetary slack compared to providing group performance feedback only. Providing information about other subordinates’ performance further increases group performance and reduces budgetary slack beyond the effects of providing individual workers information only about their own performance. The results indicate that task interdependence also affects the level of budgetary slack. Specifically, high task interdependence groups created more budgetary slack than did low task interdependence groups.

Details

Advances in Management Accounting
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-139-2

Book part
Publication date: 1 August 2008

Heather M. Caruso and Anita Williams Woolley

To reap the value in diverse teams, leaders may try to manipulate structural interdependence – through task design – to foster synergistic collaboration. However…

Abstract

To reap the value in diverse teams, leaders may try to manipulate structural interdependence – through task design – to foster synergistic collaboration. However, ambiguity about the nature and appropriate intersections of members’ unique and valuable cognitive perspectives can make it difficult to fully anticipate collaborative activity in task design. Here, teams need emergent interdependence – members must develop the desire and expectation to work interdependently for the benefit of the work. We therefore present a model of how leaders can promote emergent interdependence for diverse team success, identifying key antecedents and discussing psychological safety as a condition which can enhance their efforts.

Details

Diversity and Groups
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-053-7

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2021

Yinxuan Zhang, Tong Li, Xuan Yu and Yanzhao Tang

This study aims to examine the influence of task interdependence on team members’ Moqi in virtual teams in China. The authors also aim to identify virtual collaboration as…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the influence of task interdependence on team members’ Moqi in virtual teams in China. The authors also aim to identify virtual collaboration as a mediator and distributive justice climate as a moderator in this relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were collected from a sample of 87 virtual teams (including 349 individuals) from various Chinese companies through a three-wave survey. Hierarchical regression analysis, path analysis, bootstrapping method and multiple validity tests were used to examine the research model.

Findings

In virtual teams in China, task interdependence has a significantly positive influence on team members’ Moqi; Virtual collaboration mediates the relationship between task interdependence and team members’ Moqi; The distributive justice climate positively moderates the relationship between task interdependence and virtual collaboration, as well as the indirect effect of virtual collaboration on the relationship between task interdependence and team members’ Moqi.

Practical implications

In virtual teams, leaders can facilitate team members’ Moqi by designing highly interdependent tasks, encouraging team members to engage in virtual collaboration and cultivating a climate of high attention distributive justice.

Originality/value

This is one of the first studies to pay to the Moqi among team members rather than supervisor-subordinate relationships and further examine how team members’ Moqi is predicted by task interdependence via the mediation of virtual collaboration with the distributive justice climate playing a moderating role.

Details

Chinese Management Studies, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-614X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 April 2020

Amina Talat and Zahid Riaz

The contemporary organizational environment calls for work team members to be more resilient in the face of likely setbacks, which are routinely experienced at the…

Abstract

Purpose

The contemporary organizational environment calls for work team members to be more resilient in the face of likely setbacks, which are routinely experienced at the workplace. In two separate studies of work teams, we examine the impact of team sensemaking on team bricolage and subsequently, on team resilience. These studies further investigate whether task interdependence moderates the mediation of team bricolage for the relationship between team sensemaking and team resilience. In brief, these two studies conceptualize and test the relevance of team sensemaking, team bricolage and task interdependence for team resilience.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 213 team members participated in the self-administered survey for Study 1. For Study 2, a second sample collected from 81 teams, elicited team-level data by consensus among team members.

Findings

Findings show that team sensemaking as an antecedent has a significant and positive impact on team resilience. The results also show how and when the relationship between team sensemaking and team resilience is facilitated through an underlying mechanism of team bricolage in the presence of task interdependence among team members. This research improves the understanding about the relationship between team sensemaking and team resilience by examining the underlying mechanism and boundary condition under which the relationship is the strongest.

Practical implications

These findings have important implications for human resource managers. In face of adverse events, team sensemaking plays a pivotal role as it can enable team members to have better situational awareness, communication and reflection. Team sensemaking can be further facilitated for improved team resilience by embedding bricolage and task interdependence components in the employee orientation, job description and training of potential and current employees.

Originality/value

These findings demonstrate that in the wake of adverse events, team sensemaking can play a pivotal role as it enables team members to have better situational awareness, communication and reflection. For team resilience, the findings imply that team sensemaking can be further facilitated by team bricolage in the presence of task interdependence in work teams. Thus, managers of modern work teams and organizations can sensitize team members about these aspects through employee orientation, job description and on and off job training activities.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 49 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Daniel J. Comeau and Richard L. Griffith

To experimentally determine how the interaction of an interdependent work environment and employee personality affect organizational citizenship behavior (OCB).

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Abstract

Purpose

To experimentally determine how the interaction of an interdependent work environment and employee personality affect organizational citizenship behavior (OCB).

Design/methodology/approach

Structural interdependence, as defined by levels of task and goal interdependence, was manipulated in a laboratory setting to determine the effect on individual level OCB. Also, a regression analysis was utilized to determine whether interdependence could act as a moderator for the relationship between the personality variables agreeableness and OCB and conscientiousness and OCB.

Findings

Person‐environment interaction would suggest that the independence and personality should interact to impact levels of OCB. The results indicate a strong main effect of task interdependence on OCB and also a main effect of goal interdependence on OCB. In addition, there was also an interaction effect of task and goal interdependence. The results failed to show, however, that interdependence could act as a moderator on the relationship between agreeableness and OCB and conscientiousness and OCB.

Originality/value

Provides further research on structural characteristics of task and goal interdependence and their relationship to OCB.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 34 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 January 2007

Ferry Koster, Frans Stokman, Randy Hodson and Karin Sanders

The aim of this paper is to investigate the effects of task and informal networks and their interaction on cooperative types of employee behaviour.

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Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to investigate the effects of task and informal networks and their interaction on cooperative types of employee behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

Two studies are used to examine the research question. The first dataset consists of book‐length ethnographies providing information at the team level. The second dataset is gathered through a survey across ten different organisations and provides information at the employee level. Both datasets are analysed using OLS regression.

Findings

Cooperative behaviour is positively affected by task and informal interdependence relationships. However, when employees have task and informal interdependence relationships with co‐workers, they may show less cooperative behaviour.

Research limitations/implications

A major limitation of this study is that it was not possible to include information about the structure of the networks in which the employees are embedded. The study provides evidence for the existence of exchange relationships between the employee and the team. Besides that, the study shows the importance of including formal and informal networks to study cooperative behaviour of employees.

Practical implications

The findings provide practical information about how to manage cooperation within teams. Cooperative relationships can be created by either creating task or informal interdependence. Besides that, managers should strike a balance between task and informal interdependence.

Originality/value

Existing research tends to focus on the effects of one type of network on behaviour. This research shows that different networks may affect employee behaviour at the same time.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2006

Simon Taggar and Victor Y. Haines

The purpose of this study is to address two gaps in the existing literature. The first is why some team members have peers depend on them for material, information, and…

3741

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to address two gaps in the existing literature. The first is why some team members have peers depend on them for material, information, and support (referred to as initiated task interdependence) more so than do others, ceteris paribus. The second is the appropriateness of initiated interdependence given a team's composition.

Design/methodology/approach

In an ex post facto field study, task interdependence in 267 members of 18 intact teams were examined. The teams worked on complex and inherently interdependent tasks in a high‐technology manufacturing organization.

Findings

Whether team members perceived initiated task interdependence was explained by the degree to which members themselves depend on their peers (received interdependence), team members' belief in the value of teamwork, and team members' self‐efficacy for teamwork. As predicted, both collectivism and past job performance were associated with self‐efficacy for teamwork. The relationship between initiated interdependence and individual effectiveness was moderated by the team's collectivist orientation, such that team members were considered relatively effective by their peers when they were high in initiated task interdependence and when their team was composed of collectivists; or when they were low in initiated interdependence and when their team was composed of individualists.

Research limitations/implications

Although a one‐factor test suggests that common method bias is not an overriding concern in interpreting our findings, the possibility of common method bias inflating the associates tested cannot be rules out. Also, we cannot say with certainty that exogenous variables “caused” changes in endogenous variables.

Practical implications

Study findings suggest ways to resolve a lack of task interdependence and the importance of team composition when considering peer performance ratings.

Originality/value

This paper offers a significant contribution to the literature on task interdependence and person‐group fit.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2002

Gerben Van der Vegt and Evert Van de Vliert

This paper reviews the empirical research dealing with two types of intragroup interdependence at both the group and individual levels of analysis. Based on this review we…

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Abstract

This paper reviews the empirical research dealing with two types of intragroup interdependence at both the group and individual levels of analysis. Based on this review we identify directions for further research, including attention to levels‐of‐analysis issues, the effects of interdependence over time, and the development of prescriptive theory. The paper ends with the description of a theory‐based intervention framework, intended as a tool for choosing the appropriate intervention in work teams and for stimulating the development of such a prescriptive theory.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 March 2020

Xiaodan Zhang, Yanping Gong and Luluo Peng

Online communities are increasingly important for organizations and marketers. However, the issue of how structural features of online communities affect consumers'…

Abstract

Purpose

Online communities are increasingly important for organizations and marketers. However, the issue of how structural features of online communities affect consumers' behavioral engagement remains relatively unexplored. The purpose of this study is to examine how and why different types of interdependence within online communities (i.e. task/outcome interdependence) influence individual engagement in group activities, thereby providing insights regarding online community design.

Design/methodology/approach

Two surveys were conducted with two online groups in China. One is a task-interdependent group from Douban Forum, and the other is an outcome-interdependent group from Sina Forum. A total of 159 valid responses from the task-interdependent group and 162 valid responses from the outcome-interdependent group were received. We analyzed the data using multivariate regression with Smart PLS and SPSS.

Findings

The results reveal that both task and outcome interdependence are positively related to individual behavioral engagement in online group behavior, and collective efficacy mediates the aforementioned effects. In addition, task complexity moderates the relationship between task interdependence and individual behavioral engagement; communication within group moderates the relationship between outcome interdependence and behavioral engagement, and the effect is mediated by collective efficacy.

Originality/value

This study is the first to investigate the role of an important factor of group structure, namely, interdependence, in fueling individual behavioral engagement in online communities. The results shed light on companies' design strategies to develop and retain online community members and also provide important insights for researchers interested in social network marketing.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 38 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

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