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Book part
Publication date: 4 December 2014

Dries Meers, Tom Vermeiren and Cathy Macharis

In the last two decades, different policy initiatives have been set up to increase the share of intermodal freight transport through a modal shift. In the design of these…

Abstract

Purpose

In the last two decades, different policy initiatives have been set up to increase the share of intermodal freight transport through a modal shift. In the design of these policies, often critical break-even distances are set, showing the cost or price competitiveness of intermodal transport to delineate transport routes that qualify for such a modal shift. In this chapter, we discuss to which extent such break-even distances can be generalized on a larger scale and how they are calculated.

Methodology

We use two price-based models to calculate break-even distances for an intermodal rail and an intermodal barge transport case. General break-even values do not show the price variation in the transport market and vagueness in the calculation of these values adds to this problem.

Findings

We find that for the inland waterway case, intermodal barge transport shows potential on shorter distances as well. In addition, different ways to lower the break-even distance are discussed and a framework for calculating break-even distances is suggested.

Research limitations

The research elaborates on break-even distances in a European context using price data which are fluctuating over time, location specific and often not publicly available.

Practical implications

Policy initiatives promoting intermodal transport should not focus solely on long distance transport. Moreover, evaluating the competitiveness of the intermodal sector solely on a price comparison dishonours its true potential.

Originality/value

This chapter challenges the current European policy on intermodal transport by showing the price competitiveness of intermodal transport in two cases.

Details

Sustainable Logistics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-062-9

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 4 December 2014

Abstract

Details

Sustainable Logistics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-062-9

Article
Publication date: 28 June 2011

Antonio C. Caputo, Pacifico M. Pelagagge and Paolo Salini

The purpose of this paper is to estimate delivered hydrogen cost including both transport and expected accidents cost comparing compressed gas or liquid hydrogen road…

1563

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to estimate delivered hydrogen cost including both transport and expected accidents cost comparing compressed gas or liquid hydrogen road transport. The model allows to determine whether, in a given context, the risk of accidents is an influencing variable in the selection of the hydrogen transport mode. It also helps to select the lowest cost transport mode and route.

Design/methodology/approach

Transportation cost models are developed and integrated with a risk analysis model to determine expected accidents cost so that an overall delivered hydrogen cost can be computed. Alternative transport modes are compared on the basis of hydrogen demand, delivery distance and route type.

Findings

While safety cost in many cases can be considered negligible with respect to overall hydrogen transport cost, there are cases (high flow rate, long distance) where accident cost is relevant, especially in routes through densely populated areas. In such cases, factoring in accidents cost may significantly affect the break even point between CH2 and LH2 transport alternatives.

Research limitations/implications

The paper only deals with proven road transportation methods (CH2 and LH2). Inclusion of alternative transport modes such as pipeline or hydrides is a future research goal.

Practical implications

Decision makers can examine the costs implied by hydrogen transportation alternatives in different economic scenarios factoring in safety costs to make informed decision.

Originality/value

Available hydrogen transportation cost models neglect any safety issue, while risk assessment models only consider accident consequences costs. This work integrates both views.

Details

International Journal of Energy Sector Management, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6220

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1998

Marlena Benardska

The article presents the “cost‐volume profit analysis (CVP)” for the hotel industry.

Abstract

The article presents the “cost‐volume profit analysis (CVP)” for the hotel industry.

Details

The Tourist Review, vol. 53 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0251-3102

Keywords

Abstract

Details

City Logistics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-08-043903-7

Article
Publication date: 2 May 2017

Dewan Md Zahurul Islam and Phil N. Mortimer

The purpose of this paper is to examine the necessity of longer and/heavier and/or faster freight train operations and their viability in the European context.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the necessity of longer and/heavier and/or faster freight train operations and their viability in the European context.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a case study, the current research applies qualitative methods, including desktop research and informal discussion with the rail freight industry and shippers. The case study is the recently conducted trial of 1.5 km long Marathon freight train in Europe.

Findings

The research finds that at this stage there is no commercial necessity of running a 1.5 km long train. There are technical and operational limitations which are less problematic, but the commercial necessity is a must and that will need sufficient traffic volume on a longer route (to justify extra time and cost incurred in marshalling yard and reasonable pre- and post-consolidated rail transport haul). The time required to form up/disperse such large formation could arguably be a major constraint for the train itself as well as for other services run on the same network. The authors agree in principle with the “do more with less” notion and the necessity of faster train concept. Also, the authors are agreeing with the heavier train aspect.

Practical implications

Considering the current and future (more semi-finished and finished, containerised) cargo trend, it is more important that freight train is operated consistently, reliably, and commercially attractive relatively faster and frequent serving moderate distances (around 300+ km). Towards this, the operation of merging two (or more) short trains to form up to 750 m long trains should be explored, in particular on the nine Rail Freight Corridors, to identify the potential and realistic opportunities for commercial deployment of “longer and/or faster and/or and heavier” freight train.

Social implications

At the moment there is no need of a 1.5 km long freight train to improve the performance of EU railways.

Originality/value

The case study provides an important platform for debate on the contemporary notion of “longer”, “faster” and “heavier” freight trains in the European context.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1975

LW Leppington

Freightliners operate some 190 trains and some 700 road vehicles daily. They operate 25 terminals and the number of containers carried has gone up from 391,000 in 1969 to…

Abstract

Freightliners operate some 190 trains and some 700 road vehicles daily. They operate 25 terminals and the number of containers carried has gone up from 391,000 in 1969 to 640,000 in 1974; the budgeted figure for 1975 is 730,000. Freightliner trains can run at 75 mph, which means they can be fitted in on fast passenger lines; there is capacity for additional business. This is a summary of a paper read at the recent National Conference of the Centre for PDM.

Details

Retail and Distribution Management, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-2363

Abstract

Details

Sustainable Logistics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-062-9

Article
Publication date: 31 December 2003

Jess Browning

In the 21st Century, a region 's growth and prosperity will depend upon its intermodal transportation infrastructure and its ability to efficiently move goods, materials…

Abstract

In the 21st Century, a region 's growth and prosperity will depend upon its intermodal transportation infrastructure and its ability to efficiently move goods, materials, and people within the system whether it be from origin to destination; from supplier to customer through the various levels of the supply-chain; or from point to point within the system. Planning for the future focuses on improving a region 's intermodal transportation system efficiencies and infrastructure, its connection to other economies, and on the development of logistics institutions and facilities.

With China 's rapidly developing economy and society, record numbers of new modern facilities such as airports, ports, highways, logistics parks and warehouses are being built. Along with this, companies have made extensive investments in information technologies and software to support the tremendous growth that has taken place in the logistics industry. The development and improvement of China's historic inland water transport system is essential to their continued future growth and prosperity. In Korea, past and present National Governments have emphasized the importance of developing a North East Asian Logistics and Business Hub in their region and have worked on strategies, which include water transport, as part of an important national agenda to that end.

This article looks at how trade flows in the Yangtze and Yellow Sea Regions and between China and South Korea might be enhanced by application of improved shipping methods in marine commerce that will promote economic growth in the region. The application of logistics practices and use of barges is explored for the movement of containers on inland and coastal waterways as well as in short sea shipping which could greatly facilitate the region 's situation with respect to future economic growth.

Details

Journal of International Logistics and Trade, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1738-2122

Article
Publication date: 27 January 2012

Fredrik Eng‐Larsson and Christofer Kohn

A commonly suggested measure to make logistics greener is a shift to intermodal road‐rail transportation. Most research addresses the issue from the carrier's perspective…

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Abstract

Purpose

A commonly suggested measure to make logistics greener is a shift to intermodal road‐rail transportation. Most research addresses the issue from the carrier's perspective, arguing for ways to improve the service production to better fit the shippers' demand. In this article the issue is addressed from the shipper's perspective. The purpose is to understand what contextual factors and operations changes that are possible and/or necessary for the shipper to make a fit to the current production system.

Design/methodology/approach

Six case companies selling non‐bulk, fast moving goods are examined. These firms have gone against the mainstream and shifted modes of transport. They are investigated through a multiple case‐study design.

Findings

The findings indicate that contextual factors stressed in the carrier‐focused literature, or rule of thumb decisions made by shipping logistics management, do not always clearly predict the success of a modal shift. However, some common denominators emerge among successful cases: large transport purchasing resources, high general carrier performance, low demand volatility, and centralized system control. The study also poses some propositions regarding the success of a modal shift.

Research limitations/implications

The research is qualitative in nature and thus limited to the companies and their respective logistics systems. However, the models could be further evaluated empirically through quantitative and qualitative methods alike.

Practical implications

The paper poses a number of propositions of what constitutes a successful modal shift from a shipper's perspective, based on the identified factors and operational changes.

Originality/value

Previous research on the shift to intermodal road‐rail solutions are predominantly made from a carrier's perspective. This research addresses the issue from the shipper's perspective.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 42 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

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