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Article
Publication date: 16 August 2011

Ewan Sutherland

The purpose of this paper is to present a case study of a country with severe problems in the telecommunications sector, including corruption and maladministration.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a case study of a country with severe problems in the telecommunications sector, including corruption and maladministration.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents a review of the legislation and regulatory decisions over the last decade, plus prosecutions in the USA for bribery in the country.

Findings

The paper reveals that, despite a decade of external efforts to encourage the use of information communication technology to boost development, very little progress has been made in terms of policy, legislation and regulation. No lessons appear to have been learned; the same mistakes could be repeated.

Research limitations/implications

Further case studies are required from West Africa to provide a more complete picture and to assess whether equally serious problems exist in the region.

Practical implications

There is a need for a review of the legislation both for telecommunications and for corruption, with considerable strengthening of institutions and proper democratic accountability.

Social implications

Citizens in this country have seen much greater access to mobile telephony, but in a haphazard way. There has been no regard for their interests (e.g. higher charges), nor consideration of how bribery, high licence fees and avoidance of customs duties affect them.

Originality/value

This is one of the few case studies of telecommunications in West Africa. It addresses issues of corruption, an issue seldom discussed.

Details

info, vol. 13 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 17 May 2022

Charlemagne Dossou Seblodo Judes Gbemavo, Joelle Toffa, Cyrille Tchakpa, Yêyinou Laura Estelle Loko, Gustave Djedatin, Eben-Ezer Ewedje, Azize Orobiyi, Paulin Sedah and Francois Sabot

The purpose of this study is to evaluate rice farmers’ perceptions on the manifestations of the climate change and identify efficient strategies and determinants of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to evaluate rice farmers’ perceptions on the manifestations of the climate change and identify efficient strategies and determinants of adoption of these strategies in the Republic of Benin.

Design/methodology/approach

Surveys were conducted using participatory research appraisal tools and techniques, such as direct observation, individual interviews and field visits through a questionnaire for data collection. A total of 418 rice farmers across 39 villages located in the three climatic zones of the Republic of Benin were interviewed. Farmers’ perceptions, temperature from 1952 to 2018 and rainfall from 1960 to 2018 data obtained from meteorological stations were analysed using descriptive and inferences statistics.

Findings

All the surveyed farmers were aware of climate change and perceived diverse manifestations including the delay in rainfall regarded as the most important risk. They perceived that deforestation, no respect for the laws of nature and desacralization of morals, no respect for cultures and the traditional rainmakers are the main causes of climate change. The disruption of agricultural calendar and the reduction in rice yield were perceived as the main impacts of climate change in rice production. They used various approaches to adapt and mitigate climate change effects. The adoption of adaptation strategies was influenced either negatively or positively by the household size, land size, education level, membership to rice farmer’s association, training in rice production, access to extension services, use of improved varieties and the location in climatic zones.

Research limitations/implications

For each climatic zone of the Republic of Benin, weather data were collected in only one meteorological station.

Practical implications

The study showed that it is important to educate rice farmers on the scientific causes of climate change for better resilience. There is an urgent need to train rice farmers in irrigation and water management techniques to cope with climate variability. To promote irrigation, the authors suggest the establishment of a subsidy and credit mechanism by the government. Factors that influenced adoption of efficient adaptation strategies to climate events must be taken into account for future adaptation policies in the Republic of Benin.

Originality/value

This study provided an overview of the perceptions and adaptations of rice farmers along the climatic gradient in the Republic of Benin. Therefore, the knowledge of the determining factors of the adaptation strategies used by rice farmers could be used in the setting up of effective climate change resilience policies in Benin.

Details

International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-8692

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 November 2018

Pamphile Thierry Houngbo, Maikel Kishna, Marjolein Zweekhorst, Daton Medenou and Joske G.F. Bunder-Aelen

To satisfy donors and reduce public procurement acquisition prices, Benin has implemented and amended its first public procurement code guided by top-down principles of…

Abstract

Purpose

To satisfy donors and reduce public procurement acquisition prices, Benin has implemented and amended its first public procurement code guided by top-down principles of good governance.

Design/methodology/approach

This study aims to measure the impact of the code and its amendment on public procurement acquisition prices of health-care equipment from 1995 to 2010.

Findings

A segmented linear regression analysis was performed using interrupted time-series data. The analysis shows that the code and its amendment did not reduce acquisition prices, indicating the limited impact of the code. The authors recommend the implementation of bottom-up processes in establishing the public procurement system, and the development of a reference pricelist of the most widely used health-care equipment, as possible solutions for improving the effectiveness of the code.

Details

Journal of Public Procurement, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1535-0118

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 May 2013

Oscar Teka, Gbenato Laurent Houessou, Madjidou Oumorou, Joachim Vogt and Brice Sinsin

The purpose of this paper is to assess the local communities' perception of climate variation effects on crop production and the adopted strategies by farmers in order to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the local communities' perception of climate variation effects on crop production and the adopted strategies by farmers in order to cope with the negative effects of climate on the agriculture in the coastal zone of Benin.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 290 agricultural households were sampled and surveyed through structured interviews. The principal component analysis (PCA) was performed on the relative frequencies citation of perceived climate variation indication in order to describe the relationship between risk perceptions according to socio‐demographic characteristics. The relative frequency of citation was calculated according to age, gender, ethnic group and agro‐ecological region.

Findings

Results showed that almost 83 per cent of the respondents already perceived the climate change risks through several indications. Climate variation perception varied with respect to age. Respondents' opinion regarding climate variation causes depended generally on their age, religion and level of education. As far as climate variation risks impact on crop production is concerned, the respondents' opinions diverged.

Originality/value

The assessment of local communities' perception is important to design participatory and sustainable measures to cope with harmful effects of climate variation on crop production.

Details

International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-8692

Keywords

Expert briefing
Publication date: 31 March 2016

Political outlook for Benin.

Details

DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-DB210266

ISSN: 2633-304X

Keywords

Geographic
Topical
Expert briefing
Publication date: 27 April 2021

Talon took 86.57% of the votes, on an official turnout of 50.17%, while his nearest opponent took 11.29%. Talon’s winning margin -- the largest since Benin’s return to…

Article
Publication date: 6 November 2017

Philippe Jacques Codjo Lassou

The purpose of this paper is to examine the state of government accounting in Ghana and Benin using neo-patrimonial and organizational façade lenses.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the state of government accounting in Ghana and Benin using neo-patrimonial and organizational façade lenses.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used two country case studies that engaged with stakeholders including donors, civil society, politicians, and civil servants. Semi-structured interviews were used as the main data collection technique, which were complemented by document analysis.

Findings

The study finds that government accounting reforms are decoupled and used in both countries as a façade which is caused, to a varying degree, by indigenous neo-patrimonial governance traits of informal institutions, patronage, and clientelism. And despite the relatively superior Ghanaian system, in terms of its functioning, compared to the Beninese, government accounting plays a more symbolic role in the former than in the latter.

Originality/value

This is one of the very few theoretically informed empirical studies that examine the state of government accounting in the two major African settings – Anglophone and Francophone. The results inform policies more tailored to indigenous governance issues for better outcomes.

Details

Journal of Accounting in Emerging Economies, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-1168

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 May 2020

Tchekpo Fortune Ogouvide, Ygue Patrice Adegbola, Roch Cedrique Zossou, Afio Zannou and Gauthier Biaou

This document analyses farmers' preferences and willingness to pay (CAP) for microcredit, in order to facilitate their access in rural areas.

Abstract

Purpose

This document analyses farmers' preferences and willingness to pay (CAP) for microcredit, in order to facilitate their access in rural areas.

Design/methodology/approach

Data are based on a discrete choice experiment with 400 randomly selected farmers from 20 villages of the 7 Benin agricultural development hubs (ADHs). The preference choice modelling was performed using mixed logit (MXL) and latent class logit (LCL) models. Farmers' willingness to pay for each preferred attribute was estimated. The endogenous attribute attendance (EAA) model was also used to capture attribute non-attendance (ANA) phenomenon.

Findings

The results indicate that, on average, farmers prefer individual loans, low interest rates, in kind + cash loans, cash loans, disbursement before planting and loans with at least 10-month duration. These preferences vary according to farmers' classes. Farmers are willing to pay higher or lower interest rates depending on attribute importance. The estimate of the EAA model indicates that, when taking the ANA phenomenon into consideration, people will show stronger attitudes regarding WTP for important factors.

Research limitations/implications

Based on these results from Benin, microfinance institutions (MFIs) in developing countries can, based on the interest rates currently charged, attract more farmers as customers, reviewing the combination of the levels of the attributes associated with the nature of the loan, the type of loan (individual or collective), the disbursement period of funds, the waiting period of the loan and the loan duration. However, the study only considered production credit, ignoring equipment or investment credit.

Practical implications

The document provides information on the key factors that can facilitate producers' access to MFI products and services.

Social implications

Facilitating small farmers' access to financial service will contribute to poverty reduction.

Originality/value

This research contributes to the knowledge of the attributes and attribute levels favoured by farmers when choosing financial products and the amounts they agree to pay for these attributes. The implementation of the results would facilitate small producers' access to financial services; thus contributing to poverty reduction.

Details

Agricultural Finance Review, vol. 80 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-1466

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 March 2019

Kenneth Kponou and Benjamin Fomba Kamga

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the job quality in Benin between 2007 and 2011. To do this, the study constructed a multidimensional measure of job quality and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the job quality in Benin between 2007 and 2011. To do this, the study constructed a multidimensional measure of job quality and identified the determinants of the quality of the job. The measure adopted by the authors includes four dimensions: wages; extra-wage benefits and regularity of employment; conditions and career opportunities; and, finally, social security. Two methods, including the construction of measure of job quality and the estimation of determinants of the job quality index, were used to test the robustness of the effects. The results show that the quality of job improved slightly between 2007 and 2011 and that factors such as experience, the type of contract, the level of education, the formal character of the company and the work hours explain the job quality of workers in Benin.

Design/methodology/approach

The measure adopted by the authors includes four dimensions: wages; extra-wage benefits and regularity of employment; conditions and career opportunities; and, finally, social security. Two methods, including the construction of measure of job quality and the estimation of determinants of the job quality index, were used to test the robustness of the effects.

Findings

The results show that the quality of job improved slightly between 2007 and 2011 and that factors such as experience, the type of contract, the level of education, the formal character of the company and the work hours explain the job quality of workers in Benin.

Originality/value

The contribution of this study lies in its analytical approach and in the fact that it reinforces the knowledge that exists on this theme, which is still little studied in African countries.

Details

Employee Relations: The International Journal, vol. 41 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

Expert briefing
Publication date: 10 January 2017

Benin's development challenges.

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