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Article
Publication date: 11 September 2017

Sohyun An

How can the author, as social studies methods instructors, assist future elementary teachers develop the knowledge and skills to engage young students in critical…

Abstract

Purpose

How can the author, as social studies methods instructors, assist future elementary teachers develop the knowledge and skills to engage young students in critical examinations of race and racism, and feel empowered to take action against racial oppression? The purpose of this paper is to share one of many possible ways of “doing race” in elementary social studies teacher education.

Design/methodology/approach

First, the author proposes the topic of school segregation as a relevant and engaging inroad for elementary students to learn about race and racism. Then, the author outlines and problematizes a dominant approach to teaching about school segregation in elementary classrooms and suggests an alternative approach informed by critical race theories. Next, the author provides counterstories to dispel the dominant narrative of school segregation from an Asian critical race theory perspective. This is followed by an explanation of the lesson the author teaches in the author’s elementary social studies methods course that utilizes these perspectives and counterstories.

Findings

By using Asian-American counterstories of school segregation, the lesson seeks to assist preservice elementary teachers in disrupting the dominant teaching practices and discourses around school segregation and helps preservice teachers develop the critical understandings and competencies needed to successfully teach about race and racism in elementary classrooms.

Originality/value

The author concludes by discussing the possibilities and implications of the lesson.

Details

Social Studies Research and Practice, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1933-5415

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 9 September 2020

John S. W. Park

This chapter re-assesses the stories of three important Asian American women in the United States in the first half of the twentieth century. Like many undocumented…

Abstract

This chapter re-assesses the stories of three important Asian American women in the United States in the first half of the twentieth century. Like many undocumented migrants in our current day, they each “discovered,” as children and as young adults, that they and other members of their families had a “pariah status,” as immigrants, as women of color, and as persons who could not enjoy the rights and opportunities of citizens of the United States. This chapter explores how they coped with being “unlawful,” with their precarious status, both by evading the law and then also by becoming critics of the law itself.

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1989

Gary D. Barber and Carol Burroughs Hammond

It has been two years since our “current” survey last appeared (RSR, Summer 1987). In that survey, we covered 1985 publications. For the sake of continuity, this new…

Abstract

It has been two years since our “current” survey last appeared (RSR, Summer 1987). In that survey, we covered 1985 publications. For the sake of continuity, this new survey looks at 28 titles from 1986 and 14 from 1987. All of them are still listed in Books in Print.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Jing Gao

This study aims to explore Asian American students’ identities and their perceptions about who they are within the Midwestern American high school setting.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore Asian American students’ identities and their perceptions about who they are within the Midwestern American high school setting.

Design/methodology/approach

A naturalistic inquiry (Lincoln and Guba, 1985) is employed in this qualitative study. Naturalistic inquiry assumes that reality is constructed by individuals, and there exist multiple realities as diverse people experience teaching and learning (Glesne, 1999). It is characterized by natural settings (the schools), natural language (language actually used by students and teachers), responsiveness to concerns and issues of stakeholders (what is important to students and teachers) and collaborative checks on trustworthiness.

Findings

The study finds that the participants all identify themselves as students, while they perceive differently on their racial/ethnic and cultural identity. They have employed a variety of strategies to negotiate with their dynamic, multiple and sometimes contradictory identities when confronted with challenges and opportunities within different social contexts.

Research limitations/implications

The limitations of my study lie first in a small number of participants. Eight Asian American students do not represent the heterogeneous Asian American groups in the USA. More students would provide different perspectives and experiences in the study. The time for conducting this study is another limitation. Longer period on the research sites would provide thicker descriptions.

Practical implications

There are implications for educational practice and future research to help understand the diversity among Asian American students and to find ways to integrate accurate and comprehensive information related to Asian Americans into the curricular with critical reflection upon the issues of race, ethnicity, culture and identity.

Originality/value

This study will enrich the current literature on Asian American education because there is currently limited research in this area. It will give voices to Asian American students and contribute to a better understanding of how both students and teachers are responding to the challenges faced in many schools as demographics change. It will also have implications for teacher education and encourage awareness in this field that might affect future educational practices and policies.

Details

Journal for Multicultural Education, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-535X

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 18 December 2016

Linling Gao-Miles

This chapter is an inquiry into the paradoxes in discourses of ethnicity and race as well as of diversity and inclusion, centering on current movements in higher…

Abstract

This chapter is an inquiry into the paradoxes in discourses of ethnicity and race as well as of diversity and inclusion, centering on current movements in higher education. It aims to problematize the essentialized racial structure in American social discourses while re-evaluating academic institutions’ approaches to diversity. With a focus on Asian American students, it employs student narrations and statistical evidence to underline the neglected aspects of the heterogeneity, hybridity, and marginalization of “Asians.” The complex diversity among “Asians” and their ambiguous positionality provide insights into the challenges and paradoxes of our conceptions and practices of ethnicity, race, and diversity in general. On the one hand, I argue about the risk of prevalent practices that, to varying degrees, reconsolidate the black-white dichotomy; as they constantly strengthen disparities between the two races under the premises of the homogeneity within each category, they exclude the experiences of non-black minorities in social spheres. On the other hand, I challenge the disjuncture of diversity in theory versus in practice. While calling for a multiracial coalition to practice diversity and inclusion, I underscore the salience of unbiased perspectives in pedagogical approaches, in which, interethnicity and multiraciality are promoted, as hybrid identities beyond race are recognized. This de-Eurocentric approach ultimately aims to undermine racial essentialization and white supremacy.

Details

The Crisis of Race in Higher Education: A Day of Discovery and Dialogue
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-710-6

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Book part
Publication date: 12 September 2017

Mary Yee

This chapter examined the lived experiences of first generation Asian immigrant student activists, who waged a powerful struggle against school violence in a large urban…

Abstract

This chapter examined the lived experiences of first generation Asian immigrant student activists, who waged a powerful struggle against school violence in a large urban high school. Their struggle resisted the hegemonic practices of the district bureaucracy around racial harassment, bullying, and treatment of immigrant students, especially English Language Learners (ELLs). Mobilizing both inside and outside of school, the student activists initiated legal action, organized among their high school peers and in the Asian community, and disrupted dominant discourses about the Asian community and the abilities of first generation immigrant youth.

Using ethnographic methods such as interviews, focus groups, and analysis of archival data, the author focused on four student leaders from working class backgrounds, examining the identities and literacies they developed in the process of understanding the power dynamics between dominant institutions and racialized communities. Moreover, using the lenses of Bourdieusian and Freirean social theory, this qualitative study looked at the roles that culture and ideology, broadly construed, played in the young people’s political development and their post-secondary trajectories. This work also built on the work of Shawn Ginwright, Julio Cammarota, and Michelle Fine on youth activism and community change. The significance of this chapter lies in its contribution to the research about the intersectionality of race/ethnicity, class, immigration status, and youth activism, in particular for first generation immigrant youth.

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2012

Hong Wang

This paper aims to present an overview of information resources that have been collected, prepared, or organized by librarians in support of information, reference and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present an overview of information resources that have been collected, prepared, or organized by librarians in support of information, reference and research needs pertaining to immigration and immigrants in the USA. The overview seeks to shed light on how American libraries have responded to the tides of immigration along with other community services to newcomers.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper approaches the topic with a brief historical overview of immigration and library services. Through a comprehensive literature review the author intends to discover the degree to which American libraries have been involved in the provision of collections and services to immigrants.

Findings

The literature review indicates that the early decades of the twentieth century left a legacy of library services to immigrants with special patterns of collection development along with various organized programs. As time went by, these services have become more sophisticated and are today integrated into services of many public and academic libraries.

Originality/value

The paper provides perspectives on the social impact of immigration and immigrants – an issue which continues to challenge both public and academic libraries. The annotated bibliography contains items that are helpful to both reference personnel and researchers from academic fields and the general adult population.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 40 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 4 April 2013

Kim Geron

Purpose – This chapter will explore how Jean Quan was elected as Oakland’s first Asian American and woman mayor and the numerous challenges to lead the city’s governing…

Abstract

Purpose – This chapter will explore how Jean Quan was elected as Oakland’s first Asian American and woman mayor and the numerous challenges to lead the city’s governing coalition. Quan sought to build a diverse coalition to run the city. She has devoted her efforts to those in greatest need as she navigates the multiracial and multidynamic politics, and build her administration as progressive, inclusive, and universal.Design – This research uses voting records, U.S. Census data, media accounts, and interviews with local participants to study the research questions for this chapter; how and why did Jean Quan get elected as Mayor, and what has been her approach to leading the city’s governing coalition?Findings – This chapter’s preliminary findings after 18 months in office are that Mayor Quan has stabilized her governing coalition and has gotten back on track to begin to achieve her campaign goals.Research limitations and future research – The major limitation of this chapter’s research is Mayor Quan has been in office only 18 months, which is a short time to study Quan’s governing coalition and whether she will sustain this coalition in the coming years. Future research is needed to study how Quan compares to recent Oakland mayors and to other Asian American local elected leaders of large cities.Impact of research – This research builds upon previous research on Asian Pacific Islander elected officials at the local level and adds to the growing body of research on minority mayors and local elected officials.Value of research – As the United States grows increasingly diverse those who govern its cities have also become more diverse in the 21st century. This research makes an important contribution to the study of a fast growing population APIs and their elected leaders.

Details

21st Century Urban Race Politics: Representing Minorities as Universal Interests
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-184-7

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Book part
Publication date: 31 December 2010

Nadia Y. Kim

Purpose – This chapter is about the author's experience working for Barack Obama's presidential campaign and the racial as well as race–gender dynamics of such work.…

Abstract

Purpose – This chapter is about the author's experience working for Barack Obama's presidential campaign and the racial as well as race–gender dynamics of such work.

Methodology/approach – An autoethnographic analysis was conducted based on participant observation, primarily, door knocking in California and Texas and phone canvassing Americans across the country on a daily or weekly basis.

Findings – The fieldwork revealed the persistence of racially unequal discourse and stratification, not the workings of a post-racial society. While some Americans openly used the word “nig*er” or referenced lynching, more common were the coded forms of racism, such as the notion of “good” (Obama) versus “bad” Blacks. Also, terms like “Muslim” or “not-American” revealed a citizenship-based racism usually reserved for Asian Americans and Latinos now being levied against Black Americans. This more coded racialization hinged on a combination of subordinating Muslims as perpetual racial foreigners and fearing the “browning of America” brought on by immigration.

Research limitations/implications – As this study of a campaign assessed one point in time from an autoethnographic perspective, it is not generalizable to the United States. It, however, is an important window into the social processes involving race (and gender) when historic candidates and elections move the country in a direction it has never been to before and perhaps will never be to again.

Originality/value of paper – Although many scholars have done racial analyses of Obama's campaign and of our society's negotiation of race in relation to the man, few have conducted in-depth analyses from the vantage of a full-scale Obama campaign volunteer.

Details

Race in the Age of Obama
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-167-2

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Article
Publication date: 26 October 2010

John Kendall

Abstract

Details

Reference Reviews, vol. 24 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

Keywords

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