Search results

1 – 10 of over 30000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 August 2001

Dongsheng Wang and Brian H. Kleiner

Defines Asian Americans before looking at the historical reasons for discrimination. Outlines recent developments in the field of Asian Americans using recent case law…

Abstract

Defines Asian Americans before looking at the historical reasons for discrimination. Outlines recent developments in the field of Asian Americans using recent case law examples which cover areas such as education, public services and politics. Concludes that the AsianAmerican population has grown rapidly and will demand their equality, which has yet to be seen.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 20 no. 5/6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 1993

Edward Yeh and George Munchus

Introduction Critics have levelled charges of bias, claiming that admission policies have been aimed specifically at slowing down the influx of Asian Americans into…

Abstract

Introduction Critics have levelled charges of bias, claiming that admission policies have been aimed specifically at slowing down the influx of Asian Americans into medical schools and have therefore discriminated against them. They point to Asian American admission rates (the number of Asian Americans offered admission divided by the number of Asian American applicants) that have been lower than those of Caucasians, despite Asian American performances as measured by standardised test scores and college grade point averages that appears to be equal to and at times superior to that of Caucasians. A downward turn in Asian American admission rates at some institutions has raised the additional concern that admission officers have put informal numerical limits on the number of Asian Americans they admit. However, most admissions officers deny such.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 13 May 2014

Hyeouk Chris Hahm, Stephanie Tzu-Han Chang, Hui Qi Tong, Michelle Ann Meneses, Rojda Filiz Yuzbasioglu and Denise Hien

The purpose of this paper is to provide a review of the current literature uncovering specific factors associated with self-harm and suicidality among young Asian-American

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a review of the current literature uncovering specific factors associated with self-harm and suicidality among young Asian-American women, as well as to present the Fractured Identity Model as a framework for understanding these factors. This paper offers concrete suggestions for the development of culturally competent interventions to target suicidality, substance abuse, and mental illness among young Asian-American women.

Design/methodology/approach

Empirical studies and theory-based papers featured in peer-reviewed journals between 1990 and 2014 were identified through scholarly databases, such as PubMed, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, JSTOR, and Google Scholar. Of an original 32 articles, 12 were chosen for in-depth empirical review due to relevance to the topics at hand, quality of research, and significance of findings.

Findings

The paper identified several factors associated with suicidality among young Asian-American women: family dynamics, or having lived in a household where parents practice “disempowering parenting styles,” substance use/abuse, and untreated mental illness(es), which are exacerbated by the stigma and shame attached to seeking out mental health services. The Fractured Identity Model by Hahm et al. (2014) is presented as a proposed causal pathway from disempowering parenting to suicidal and self-harm behaviors among this population, with substance abuse playing a significant mediating role.

Research limitations/implications

The review focussed on Asian-American women, substance use among Asian-Americans, and mental health among Asian-Americans. Literature that focused on Asians living in Asia or elsewhere outside of the USA was excluded from this review; the review was limited to research conducted in the USA and written in the English language.

Practical implications

The complex interplay among Asian-American culture, family dynamics, gender roles/expectations, and mental health justifies the development of a suicide and substance abuse intervention that is tailored to the culture- and gender-specific needs of Asian Pacific Islander young women. It is imperative for professionals in the fields of public health, mental health, medicine, and substance abuse to proactively combat the “model minority” myth and to design and implement interventions targeting family dynamics, coping with immigration/acculturative stresses, mental illnesses, suicidal behaviors, and substance abuse among Asian-American populations across the developmental lifespan.

Originality/value

This paper provides specific suggestions for interventions to adequately respond to the mental health needs of young Asian-American women. These include addressing the cultural stigma and shame of seeking help, underlying family origin issues, and excessive alcohol and drug use as unsafe coping, as well as incorporating empowerment-based and mind-body components to foster an intervention targeting suicidality among Asian-American women in early adulthood.

Details

Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1996

Durriya Z. Khairullah, Frances Gaither Tucker and Clint B. Tankersley

This study compares perceptions regarding Indian versus American print advertisements of Asian‐Indian immigrants residing in the United States of America. It examines…

Abstract

This study compares perceptions regarding Indian versus American print advertisements of Asian‐Indian immigrants residing in the United States of America. It examines whether these perceptions varied with their degree of acculturation. Our results show that when Asian‐Indian immigrants are treated as a homogeneous group without considering their degree of acculturation, the preferences for Indian versus American advertisements are mixed. However, when examined from an acculturative perspective, we find that as acculturation increased, subjects preferred American advertisements more, and Indian advertisements less. The results imply that degree of acculturation should be considered as a segmentation variable when developing an advertising strategy for immigrant consumers.

Details

International Journal of Commerce and Management, vol. 6 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1056-9219

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2000

Carol Kaufman‐Scarborough

The AsianAmerican consumer group is thought to be the fastest‐growing market in the USA. AsianAmericans are thought to be well‐educated, generally affluent, and…

Abstract

The AsianAmerican consumer group is thought to be the fastest‐growing market in the USA. AsianAmericans are thought to be well‐educated, generally affluent, and geographically concentrated. However, significant cultural and language differences among Asian subgroups are often overlooked. These include patterns of information gathering, use of promotional media, and methods of household decision making. This article presents a comparative marketing examination of the similarities and differences among five of the largest AsianAmerican groups and develops implications for marketing strategies.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 1992

Judy Cohen

Discusses consumer response to the use of Asian models to reach theAsianAmerican market through mass media advertising. Reports on theresults of an empirical study to…

Abstract

Discusses consumer response to the use of Asian models to reach the AsianAmerican market through mass media advertising. Reports on the results of an empirical study to discover white consumer reactions to Asians in advertising. Summarizes that Asian models achieved a more favourable response advertising products associated with Asian manufacture, a less favourable response with status products, while there is no difference in response for convenience products.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 28 September 2020

Hyunsu Oh

Purpose – This study examined the impacts of racial discrimination on the self-reported health among Asian Americans.Methodology/Approach – This study investigated a…

Abstract

Purpose – This study examined the impacts of racial discrimination on the self-reported health among Asian Americans.

Methodology/Approach – This study investigated a subsample of 1,090 Asian Americans from the 2008 National Asian American Survey. Three-category measure of self-reported health was constructed ain. Racial discrimination experiences encompassed (1) interpersonal discrimination, (2) institutional racism, and (3) hate crime. Ordered logistic regression models were employed to test the association between self-reported health and experiences of racial discrimination among Asian Americans.

Findings – With respect to ethnic origin, South Asians showed lower levels of self-reported health than East Asians/Asian Indians. Although the baseline effect of each discrimination indicator was insignificant, there was an interactional effect between ethnic origin and racial discrimination, indicating the more interpersonal discriminatory experiences, the worse health status for South Asians.

Research limitations – There remained some limitations including data and the measures of racial discrimination.

Originality/Value of Paper – Despite the limitations, this study revealed that as a risk factor, how experiences of racial discrimination shape health disparities among ethnic groups in the United States, focusing on the heterogeneity within Asian Americans.

Details

Race, Ethnicity, Gender and Other Social Characteristics as Factors in Health and Health Care Disparities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-798-3

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 2 October 2012

Frederick T.L. Leong, Donald Eggerth, Michael Flynn, Rashaun Roberts and Stanton Mak

In this chapter, we have proposed that an important approach to understanding occupational stress and well-being among racial and ethnic minority workers is to integrate…

Abstract

In this chapter, we have proposed that an important approach to understanding occupational stress and well-being among racial and ethnic minority workers is to integrate the occupational health disparities paradigm into work stress research. As such, the current chapter provides a state-of-the-art review of the existing literature on occupational health disparities for Latinos, Asian Americans, and African Americans. Each of the three sections has highlighted the unique occupational health problems encountered by the specific racial and ethnic group as well as the research and policy gaps. We end with a series of recommendations for future research.

Details

The Role of the Economic Crisis on Occupational Stress and Well Being
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-005-5

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 18 August 2011

Shirley Hune

There is a paucity of research on Asian American women's progress in higher education as faculty. This chapter contextualizes Asian American women as “Other” faculty who…

Abstract

There is a paucity of research on Asian American women's progress in higher education as faculty. This chapter contextualizes Asian American women as “Other” faculty who because of their race, gender, and presumed “foreigner” background are not seen as normal faculty. In disrupting traditional student–faculty relations where White males are considered normal and hold positions of power, Asian American women as women faculty of color are subject to being contested in the classroom. I examine here their classroom experiences with attention to student resistance and faculty agency through critical feminist, race, and intersectionality frameworks.

The study is based on a secondary data analysis of qualitative studies on Asian American women's classroom experiences in predominantly White institutions. It finds that students of all racial/ethnic and gender backgrounds may resist their faculty role, oftentimes through uncivil behaviors. Students hold racial, gender, and ethnocentric stereotypes and biases of their teaching capabilities and course offerings. Teaching race–gender–class–nation courses can contribute to lower or mixed course evaluations. In claiming their rightful place, Asian American women faculty seek to make a difference through student-centered learning, innovative pedagogy, and new curricula that prepare students for a diverse and global society. They demonstrate their authenticity, authority, and agency in the ways they navigate challenging classroom situations and serve as role models for all students and faculty.

Details

Women of Color in Higher Education: Turbulent Past, Promising Future
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-169-5

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 18 December 2016

Linling Gao-Miles

This chapter is an inquiry into the paradoxes in discourses of ethnicity and race as well as of diversity and inclusion, centering on current movements in higher…

Abstract

This chapter is an inquiry into the paradoxes in discourses of ethnicity and race as well as of diversity and inclusion, centering on current movements in higher education. It aims to problematize the essentialized racial structure in American social discourses while re-evaluating academic institutions’ approaches to diversity. With a focus on Asian American students, it employs student narrations and statistical evidence to underline the neglected aspects of the heterogeneity, hybridity, and marginalization of “Asians.” The complex diversity among “Asians” and their ambiguous positionality provide insights into the challenges and paradoxes of our conceptions and practices of ethnicity, race, and diversity in general. On the one hand, I argue about the risk of prevalent practices that, to varying degrees, reconsolidate the black-white dichotomy; as they constantly strengthen disparities between the two races under the premises of the homogeneity within each category, they exclude the experiences of non-black minorities in social spheres. On the other hand, I challenge the disjuncture of diversity in theory versus in practice. While calling for a multiracial coalition to practice diversity and inclusion, I underscore the salience of unbiased perspectives in pedagogical approaches, in which, interethnicity and multiraciality are promoted, as hybrid identities beyond race are recognized. This de-Eurocentric approach ultimately aims to undermine racial essentialization and white supremacy.

Details

The Crisis of Race in Higher Education: A Day of Discovery and Dialogue
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-710-6

1 – 10 of over 30000