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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2020

Sally Smith, Thomas N. Garavan, Anne Munro, Elaine Ramsey, Colin F. Smith and Alison Varey

The purpose of this study is to explore the role of professional and leader identity and the maintenance of identity, through identity work as IT professionals…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore the role of professional and leader identity and the maintenance of identity, through identity work as IT professionals transitioned to a permanent hybrid role. This study therefore contributes to the under-researched area of permanent transition to a hybrid role in the context of IT, where there is a requirement to enact both the professional and leader roles together.

Design/methodology/approach

The study utilised a longitudinal design and two qualitative methods (interviews and reflective diaries) to gather data from 17 IT professionals transitioning to hybrid roles.

Findings

The study findings reveal that IT professionals engage in an ongoing process of reconciliation of professional and leader identity as they transition to a permanent hybrid role, and they construct hybrid professional–leader identities while continuing to value their professional identity. They experience professional–leader identity conflict resulting from reluctance to reconcile both professional and leader identities. They used both integration and differentiation identity work tactics to ameliorate these tensions.

Originality/value

The longitudinal study design, the qualitative approaches used and the unique context of the participants provide a dynamic and deep understanding of the challenges involved in performing hybrid roles in the context of IT.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article
Publication date: 3 July 2007

Colin Lindsay, Anne Munro and Sarah Wise

This paper seeks to analyse trade unions’ approaches to equal opportunities in Scotland, focusing on issues of: recruitment of membership from different groups; promoting…

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2457

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to analyse trade unions’ approaches to equal opportunities in Scotland, focusing on issues of: recruitment of membership from different groups; promoting diversity in post‐holding; and the role of “key equalities issues” in collective bargaining.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on in‐depth interviews with equalities officers of 26 unions in Scotland. The analysis takes as its starting point the three models of equality policies identified by Rees: the “sameness”, “difference” and “transformation” models.

Findings

The paper argues that, although some equalities officers demonstrated a thorough understanding of the issues, union approaches to equalities in practice reflect the “sameness”, and to some extent “difference”, models: attacking direct discrimination and insisting that members should be treated the same, establishing some limited mechanisms to reflect on the different needs of groups, but being less able to tackle the underlying structural causes of inequality. It is suggested that unions need to develop a more sophisticated analysis of equal opportunities which fully reflects the differences between the experiences of groups of workers and which challenges the fundamental, structural inequalities within (and therefore seeks to transform) organisations and labour markets. A key element of this agenda must be the mainstreaming of equal opportunities within collective bargaining.

Research limitations/implications

Further research is required on how unions are beginning to deal with the issues raised in the paper. The paper is also limited to the views of individual equalities officers – further research on local practice is required.

Practical implications

The findings will be of interest to organisations engaged in equalities work and unions seeking to develop policy and practice in this area.

Originality/value

The paper will add to the literature on unions’ approaches to equalities. It applies the Rees model to extensive new data, and is the first major piece of research to address these issues within the Scottish policy context.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2000

Jonathan C. Morris

Looks at the 2000 Employment Research Unit Annual Conference held at the University of Cardiff in Wales on 6/7 September 2000. Spotlights the 76 or so presentations within…

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Abstract

Looks at the 2000 Employment Research Unit Annual Conference held at the University of Cardiff in Wales on 6/7 September 2000. Spotlights the 76 or so presentations within and shows that these are in many, differing, areas across management research from: retail finance; precarious jobs and decisions; methodological lessons from feminism; call centre experience and disability discrimination. These and all points east and west are covered and laid out in a simple, abstract style, including, where applicable, references, endnotes and bibliography in an easy‐to‐follow manner. Summarizes each paper and also gives conclusions where needed, in a comfortable modern format.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 23 no. 9/10/11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

Anne Munro

Contributes to debates about employee involvement and social partnership by exploring the ways in which individualist and collectivist aspects interrelate in a single…

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3775

Abstract

Contributes to debates about employee involvement and social partnership by exploring the ways in which individualist and collectivist aspects interrelate in a single initiative in the National Health Service. Identifies a particular form of employee involvement in which partnership is integral. Draws on a case study of one NHS Trust over a period of 18 months, using individual and group interviews with senior and line managers, union officials, shop stewards and staff. Argues that tension between collectivism and individualism becomes more acute lower down the organisation where line managers are responsible for implementing change. Highlights how understanding of involvement and partnership change over time and how a climate that is more amenable to union organisation can be created.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2015

Bryan McIntosh, Ronald McQuaid and Anne Munro

This purpose of this paper is to engage two enduring sets of assumptions within nursing: firstly, that woman with children should prioritise the care of children; and…

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4700

Abstract

Purpose

This purpose of this paper is to engage two enduring sets of assumptions within nursing: firstly, that woman with children should prioritise the care of children; and secondly, that nursing standards require nurses to put their profession above other priorities. Commitment is linked to full-time working which contrasts sharply with the reality for many women with children who need to work part-time and are not able to change or extend working hours

Design/methodology/approach

This qualitative research involved the use of 32 in-depth interviews with 32 female registered nurses with children and without children. They were employed in “acute” nursing, aged between 25 and 60 years, and in registered grades “D” to “senior nurse manager”. They worked or had worked on a variety of employment conditions, some, but not all, had taken career breaks. The rationale for exclusively selecting women was based on the need to identify and describe organisational, situational and individual factors related to women and the associations and barriers which affected their careers.

Findings

In a female-dominated profession, we find the profession resisting attempts to make the profession more accessible to women with young children. The career progression of women with children is inhibited, and this is driven in part by a determination to maintain “traditional” employment practices.

Originality/value

This paper develops Heilman’s argument that gender perceptions, by both males and females, can be biased against women, and these produce gender inequalities in employment. These findings are relevant across many areas of employment, and they are significant in relation to broadening the debate around equal opportunities for women.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2012

Bryan McIntosh, Ronald McQuaid, Anne Munro and Parviz Dabir‐Alai

After many years of equal opportunities legislation, motherhood still limits womens' career progress even in a feminized occupation such as nursing. While the effect of…

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4373

Abstract

Purpose

After many years of equal opportunities legislation, motherhood still limits womens' career progress even in a feminized occupation such as nursing. While the effect of motherhood, working hours, career breaks and school aged children upon career progression has been discussed widely, its actual scale and magnitude has received less research attention. The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of these factors individually and cumulatively.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper considers the impact of the above through a longitudinal analysis of a demographically unique national database, comprising the 46,565 registered nursing workforces in NHS Scotland from 2000‐2008. The variables examined include gender, employment grades, number and length of career breaks, lengths of service, age, working patterns, the number and age of dependent children.

Findings

The results indicate: motherhood has a regressively detrimental effect on women's career progression. However, this is a simplistic term which covers a more complex process related to the age of dependent children, working hours and career breaks. The degree of women's restricted career progression is directly related to the school age of the dependent children: the younger the child the greater the detrimental impact. Women who take a career break of greater than two years see their careers depressed and restricted. The results confirm that whilst gender has a relatively positive effect on male career progression; a women's career progression is reduced incrementally as she has more children, and part‐time workers have reduced career progression regardless of maternal or paternal circumstances.

Originality/value

This paper is the only example internationally, of a national workforce being examined on this scale and therefore its findings are significant. For the first time the impact of motherhood upon a women's career progression and the related factors – dependent children, career breaks and part‐time working are quantified. These findings are relevant across many areas of employment and they are significant in relation to broadening the debate around equal opportunities for women.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 27 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2001

Paul Blyton, Edmund Heery and Peter Turnbull

Presents 35 abstracts from the 2001 Employment Research Unit Annual conference held at Cardiff Business School in September 2001. Attempts to explore the theme of changing…

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4323

Abstract

Presents 35 abstracts from the 2001 Employment Research Unit Annual conference held at Cardiff Business School in September 2001. Attempts to explore the theme of changing politics of employment relations beyond and within the nation state, against a background of concern in the developed economies at the erosion of relatively advanced conditions of work and social welfare through increasing competition and international agitation for more effective global labour standards. Divides this concept into two areas, addressing the erosion of employment standards through processes of restructuring and examining attempts by governments, trade unions and agencies to re‐create effective systems of regulation. Gives case examples from areas such as India, Wales, London, Ireland, South Africa, Europe and Japan. Covers subjects such as the Disability Discrimination Act, minimum wage, training, contract workers and managing change.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 24 no. 10/11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1992

Tim Bond

Discusses the ethical and legal complexities of confidentiality incounselling where, often, there is uncertainty about what the optimumpractice should be, and when there…

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2579

Abstract

Discusses the ethical and legal complexities of confidentiality in counselling where, often, there is uncertainty about what the optimum practice should be, and when there may also be problems in implementing ethical practice. Reports on the codes of practice, published by the British Association of Counsellors, which are intended to clarify this situation. Discusses confidentiality and the law, and a counsellor′s conflicting obligations to client and employer.

Details

Employee Councelling Today, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-8217

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 February 2006

Mustafa F. Özbilgin

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976

Abstract

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Article
Publication date: 12 February 2018

Norma D’Annunzio-Green and Richard Teare

The purpose of this paper is to profile the WHATT theme issue “Is talent management a strategic priority in the hospitality sector?” with reference to the experiences of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to profile the WHATT theme issue “Is talent management a strategic priority in the hospitality sector?” with reference to the experiences of the theme editor and writing team.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses structured questions to enable the theme editor to reflect on the rationale for the theme issue question, the starting point, the selection of the writing team and material and the editorial process.

Findings

It identifies five re-occurring themes as being particularly relevant to hospitality organizations when considering a strategic approach to talent management. They are the role of line managers in employee development and well-being; talent management being used as a lever for culture change; the importance of contextualizing approaches to talent management; the need for new and innovative ways of working to achieve a strategic approach to talent management; and barriers to development of a strategic approach caused by economic and day-to-day operational pressures.

Practical implications

The theme issue outcomes provide lines of enquiry for others to explore and reinforce the value of WHATT’s approach to collaborative working and writing.

Originality/value

The collaborative work reported in this theme issue offers fresh insights on the current practice and future priorities for talent management in an industry that struggles to attract and retain employees.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

Keywords

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