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Article
Publication date: 5 May 2015

Annabel McDonald and Aamer Sarfraz

– This paper aims to consider whether the hospital mission statement can be used as a management tool to improve service provision in failing hospitals.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to consider whether the hospital mission statement can be used as a management tool to improve service provision in failing hospitals.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature search into the potential value and harm of hospital mission statements was done, followed by a survey of initial attitudes within a failing hospital. Do they indicate likely success of the tool?

Findings

Mission statement is a potentially valuable leadership tool in the hospital environment. The success of its implementation is broadly dependent on its being developed with the support of stakeholders and its real application to all management decisions and questions of asset allocation. The potential danger lies in the fact that it can be seen as an expensive expression of politically correct platitudes which leads to cynical alienation of stakeholders.

Research limitations/implications

This was a small study within a single UK failing hospital, and extending its range will help to clarify whether its findings are typical of attitudes within such institutions.

Practical implications

The likely success of the hospital mission statement as a management tool within a failing hospital is significantly limited by initial attitudes and preconceptions. Our research suggests that implementation is likely to be detrimental without preparatory involvement of the local community and hospital staff at all levels.

Social implications

Hospital management cannot be divorced from the local community where patient confidence must be maintained.

Originality/value

This paper complements previous research, which has looked at mission statement acceptance among the upper echelons of hospital management.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 September 2015

Annabel Jane McDonald and Helen Towner

– A pragmatic evaluation of the practicality of diabetes screening for users of serotonin specific reuptake inhibitors (SSRI’s). The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Abstract

Purpose

A pragmatic evaluation of the practicality of diabetes screening for users of serotonin specific reuptake inhibitors (SSRI’s). The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

This study audited the response of SSRI-users to personal invitation for diabetes screening. One-third of such patients had been screened during the past year. The remaining 217 patients were invited for fasting blood glucose tests and the improvement in screening rates measured. The rate of positive results was compared to a cohort who received fasting blood glucose screening due to physical risk factors for diabetes.

Findings

Specific invitation increased the take-up of screening from 34 to 52 per cent of SSRI-users. Engagement was significantly better when patients could be contacted by telephone rather than letter. The SSRI-using cohort had a greater rate of identified diabetes than a cohort with physical risk factors for diabetes.

Practical implications

SSRI-users are a difficult group to engage in medical screening and an assertive approach is of value. It is likely that the physical care of these patients would be enhanced by the active maintenance of contact by a practice healthcare professional. Screening of SSRI-users for diabetes is justified by both detection rate and the importance of establishing co-morbidity in terms of treatment decisions.

Originality/value

Co-morbidity of diabetes and depression has been observed to result in a poor prognosis for the patient which can be tempered if successful engagement leads to early treatment of both conditions with a more tailored choice of medication and care.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 July 2022

Annabel Simjouw, Nienke Verstegen, Wineke Smid and Agnita Langeveld

The aim of this study is to gain a better understanding of the concerns and needs of forensic psychiatric patients regarding the impact of the COVID-19 crisis on their mental…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study is to gain a better understanding of the concerns and needs of forensic psychiatric patients regarding the impact of the COVID-19 crisis on their mental health and treatment.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi-structured interviews were conducted with nine patients from various wards of the hospital. Using the consensual qualitative research method, these interviews were coded by a team of three researchers.

Findings

Four domains emerged from the analysis, namely, restrictions, emotional consequences, coping and communication. One of the primary restrictions for patients was not being allowed to have physical contact with the people in their network/visitors. This prompted patients, in some cases, to decline visitors altogether. Emotional consequences of the COVID-19 measurements included anxiety, frustration and passivity. Ambiguity about the rules added to this frustration. Furthermore, a cut in autonomy was felt by patients due to them not being able to do their own grocery shopping. Despite these restrictions that were imposed on patients, the relationship between patients and staff was perceived as good and even improved according to the participants.

Practical implications

A lack of autonomy emerged as a salient issue related to the restrictions within the hospital. Certain degrees of control may be inevitable, but it is nonetheless important to focus on the effect of control within forensic settings. This could be done by aiming to actively include patients in decisions that affect their living climate. Furthermore, it appeared that the “ballet dancer” approach was used by the staff of the hospital, leaving more room for individualized care. As perceived support is important to increase willingness to accept the treatment being offered, a focus on this approach in times of rapid change such as during a pandemic, would be recommended.

Originality/value

Because few pandemics have occurred in the past century, little information is available about how a pandemic might affect patients residing in forensic psychiatric hospitals. To the best of the authors’ knowledge this is one of the first studies to assess concerns and needs of forensic psychiatric patients regarding the COVID-19 pandemic.

Details

The Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 May 2021

Aurély Lao, Mariana Vlad and Annabel Martin

This research analyzes how the dimensions of the customer experience derived from using a digital kiosk during the store visit influence shopping value, self-mental imagery and…

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Abstract

Purpose

This research analyzes how the dimensions of the customer experience derived from using a digital kiosk during the store visit influence shopping value, self-mental imagery and the behavioral intentions of buying and word of mouth. Mediation effects of utilitarian, hedonic and social shopping values are examined, as well as the mediating effect of self-mental imagery.

Design/methodology/approach

Two empirical studies were conducted to test the research hypotheses. A first analysis was carried out using a sample of 115 customers from several retail sectors. For the second study, 200 customers of one of the largest international sporting goods retailers were interviewed immediately after their store visit.

Findings

The results confirm significant influences of each dimension of the digital kiosk customer experience (sensorial, pragmatic, cognitive, social) on shopping value and self-mental imagery. They highlight strongest effects as well as the quasi-generalized mediating role of these values, and this self-mental imagery in the relations between the components of the experience and the behavioral intentions.

Research limitations/implications

The studies were carried out in only one country (France). It would be also useful to consider variations in shopping motives and in involvement between retail sectors. Highlighted relationships should be deepened by experiments intended to identify the psychological mechanisms and emotions capable of mediating influences of customer experience on shopping value.

Practical implications

The results encourage both advice on the design of digital kiosks and the specifications of their content and several recommendations about the widespread introduction of kiosks or similar new technologies.

Originality/value

This research highlights influences of each of components of customer experience when using an interactive kiosk on shopping values and self-mental imagery, and central roles of these in understanding influences of the customer experience on behavioral responses.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 49 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1999

Allyson Carlyle

This paper examines a user categorisation of documents related to a particular literary work. Fifty study participants completed an unconstrained sorting task of documents related…

Abstract

This paper examines a user categorisation of documents related to a particular literary work. Fifty study participants completed an unconstrained sorting task of documents related to Charles Dickens’ A Christmas carol. After they had finished the sorting task, participants wrote descriptions of the attributes they used to create each group. Content analysis of these descriptions revealed categories of attributes used for grouping. Participants used physical format, audience, content description, pictorial elements, usage, and language most frequently for grouping. Many of the attributes participants used for grouping already exist in bibliographic records and may be used to cluster records related to works automatically in online catalogue displays. The attributes used by people in classifying or grouping documents related to a work may be used to guide the design of summary online catalogue work displays.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 55 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1985

The librarian and researcher have to be able to uncover specific articles in their areas of interest. This Bibliography is designed to help. Volume IV, like Volume III, contains…

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Abstract

The librarian and researcher have to be able to uncover specific articles in their areas of interest. This Bibliography is designed to help. Volume IV, like Volume III, contains features to help the reader to retrieve relevant literature from MCB University Press' considerable output. Each entry within has been indexed according to author(s) and the Fifth Edition of the SCIMP/SCAMP Thesaurus. The latter thus provides a full subject index to facilitate rapid retrieval. Each article or book is assigned its own unique number and this is used in both the subject and author index. This Volume indexes 29 journals indicating the depth, coverage and expansion of MCB's portfolio.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 23 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 April 2021

Beatriz López, Niko Kargas, Julie Udell, Tomáš Rubín, Linda Burgess, Dominic Dew, Ian McDonald, Ann O’Brien and Karen Templeton-Mepstead

The purpose of this study was to explore the views of autistic people, carers and practitioners regarding the barriers autistic employees face at work (Study 1) and to use these…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to explore the views of autistic people, carers and practitioners regarding the barriers autistic employees face at work (Study 1) and to use these views to inform the design of an employment programme for autistic employees without learning disabilities (Study 2).

Design/methodology/approach

In Study 1, 16 (20%) carers, 17 (21%) practitioners and 47 (59%) autistic adults who had been or were currently employed, answered a survey regarding barriers at work. Study 2 evaluates the efficacy of a set of profiling assessment tools (PA) developed to help employers make individually-tailored adjustments for their autistic employees by delivering an employment programme consisting of 15, 8-week work placements.

Findings

In Study 1, only 25% of autistic adults reported having had adjustments in the workplace and all groups reported this as the main barrier – alongside employers’ lack of understanding. Two sets of results demonstrate the efficacy of the PA tools in addressing this barrier. First, a comparative cost simulation revealed a cost-saving in terms of on-job support of £6.67 per participant per hour worked relative to published data from another programme. Second, 83% of autistic employees reported having had the right adjustments at work.

Research limitations/implications

This is an exploratory study that did not include a comparison group. Hence, it was not possible to evaluate the efficacy of the PA tools relative to a standard employment programme intervention, nor to assess cost reduction, which currently is only estimated from already available published data.

Practical implications

Overall the findings from these studies demonstrate that the time invested in the high-quality assessment of the profile of autistic employees results in saving costs over time and better outcomes.

Originality/value

The originality of the Autism Centre for Employment programme resides in that, unlike other programmes, it shifts the focus from helping autistic employees to helping their employers.

Details

Advances in Autism, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-3868

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 20 November 2017

Katarzyna Janusz, Sofie Six and Dominique Vanneste

In a current trend of a growing amount of short city trips, it becomes crucial to understand how local residents perceive the presence of tourists and tourism in their cities and…

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Abstract

Purpose

In a current trend of a growing amount of short city trips, it becomes crucial to understand how local residents perceive the presence of tourists and tourism in their cities and how their socio-cultural context influences those perceptions. The purpose of this paper is to contribute to this understanding which will enable the city planners to take actions to create the well-balanced and resilient communities in which the needs of residents and tourists are equally met.

Design/methodology/approach

To understand residents’ perceptions’ about tourism in Bruges, this research applied photo-elicitation interviews with 28 residents who lived in various locations in the historical center to understand socio-cultural background of residents, their tourism-related concerns and whether they are in line with what is commonly perceived as problematic in Bruges.

Findings

Results show that as long as residents can benefit from tourism and tourism-related infrastructure, they support tourism. On the other hand, tourism decreases the liveability of the historical center due to supersession of infrastructure serving the residents by tourist-oriented amenities.

Practical implications

To build a sustainable and resilient city in the future, the authorities of Bruges should cease further “museumification” of the historical city by breaking the hegemony of tourism industry, providing affordable housing and rethinking the concentration model of tourism.

Originality/value

The photo-elicitation method proved to produce rich content and good-quality data by stimulating respondents’ memories and evoking experiences and emotions. Thus, this paper recommends that future research about residents’ attitudes is developed around visual methods as they give voice to the residents and are able to uncover issues which are difficult to capture with other methods.

Details

Journal of Tourism Futures, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-5911

Keywords

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