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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2021

Aurély Lao, Mariana Vlad and Annabel Martin

This research analyzes how the dimensions of the customer experience derived from using a digital kiosk during the store visit influence shopping value, self-mental…

Abstract

Purpose

This research analyzes how the dimensions of the customer experience derived from using a digital kiosk during the store visit influence shopping value, self-mental imagery and the behavioral intentions of buying and word of mouth. Mediation effects of utilitarian, hedonic and social shopping values are examined, as well as the mediating effect of self-mental imagery.

Design/methodology/approach

Two empirical studies were conducted to test the research hypotheses. A first analysis was carried out using a sample of 115 customers from several retail sectors. For the second study, 200 customers of one of the largest international sporting goods retailers were interviewed immediately after their store visit.

Findings

The results confirm significant influences of each dimension of the digital kiosk customer experience (sensorial, pragmatic, cognitive, social) on shopping value and self-mental imagery. They highlight strongest effects as well as the quasi-generalized mediating role of these values, and this self-mental imagery in the relations between the components of the experience and the behavioral intentions.

Research limitations/implications

The studies were carried out in only one country (France). It would be also useful to consider variations in shopping motives and in involvement between retail sectors. Highlighted relationships should be deepened by experiments intended to identify the psychological mechanisms and emotions capable of mediating influences of customer experience on shopping value.

Practical implications

The results encourage both advice on the design of digital kiosks and the specifications of their content and several recommendations about the widespread introduction of kiosks or similar new technologies.

Originality/value

This research highlights influences of each of components of customer experience when using an interactive kiosk on shopping values and self-mental imagery, and central roles of these in understanding influences of the customer experience on behavioral responses.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 49 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 23 February 2021

Saqib Ali, Manit Mishra and Hafiz Muhammad Usama Javed

The purpose of this study is to examine the association between mall personality, hedonic and utilitarian shopping value, and shoppers' well-being. The moderating effect…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the association between mall personality, hedonic and utilitarian shopping value, and shoppers' well-being. The moderating effect of compulsive shopping on the association between both hedonic and utilitarian shopping value, and shoppers' well-being is also investigated.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is quantitative in nature, and a purposive sampling technique is used. Data was collected through mall intercept survey. The authors collected 431 usable responses from respondents at two different malls in Lahore, Pakistan. PLS-SEM was employed to test the proposed hypotheses.

Findings

Results indicate that mall personality significantly and positively influences both hedonic and utilitarian shopping value and shoppers' well-being. Similarly, hedonic shopping value has a significant and positive impact on shoppers' well-being, while utilitarian shopping value has a non-significant relationship with shoppers' well-being. Moreover, while compulsive shopping behaviour moderates the positive relationship between hedonic shopping value and shoppers' well-being, it does not moderate the relationship between utilitarian shopping value and shoppers' well-being.

Originality/value

Despite the extant studies on brand and store personality on numerous retail outcomes, no study has examined the association between mall personality and shoppers' well-being. Another key contribution of this study is to examine moderation effect of compulsive shopping on the association between shopping value and shoppers' well-being. Additionally, this study enlightens mall administration to emphasise upon mall personality and hedonic shopping value so as to enhance shoppers' well-being, more so if its product assortment encourages compulsive shopping.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 49 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2020

Xiao-Yu Xu, Syed Muhammad Usman Tayyab, Fang-Kai Chang and Kai Zhao

This study elicits the critical attributes, consequences and values associated with the purchasing process in the context of cross-border e-commerce (CBEC). The purpose is…

Abstract

Purpose

This study elicits the critical attributes, consequences and values associated with the purchasing process in the context of cross-border e-commerce (CBEC). The purpose is to provide a better understanding of the fundamental factors that determine consumer values in CBEC.

Design/methodology/approach

The study applies the means-end-chain theory and soft-laddering techniques to interview 60 CBEC consumers to construct an implication matrix and a hierarchical value map (HVM) of the consumer purchasing process, consisting of attribute-consequence-value (A-C-V) paths.

Findings

By analyzing the significant linkages, elements, ladders and chains in the HVM, four dominant A-C-V paths were identified: economic-driven, efficiency-driven, progress-driven and quality-driven paths.

Research limitations/implications

This study included only Chinese CBEC buyers. This limitation might affect the generalizability of the conclusions as culture, purchase habits and economic development differ between China and other countries.

Practical implications

The results of this study provide CBEC practitioners an understanding of the consumer purchasing process and how consumer values are associated with platform characteristics. Thus, the results aid practitioners in allocating resources and developing CBEC platforms in an appropriate manner and direction.

Originality/value

This study sheds lights on the emerging phenomenon of CBEC. By applying the means-end-chain approach, the study provides a comprehensive HVM for interpreting the consumer online purchasing process in this novel context. By illustrating the dominant paths, this research provides deeper theoretical insights into the specific focuses of CBEC consumer purchasing.

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Article
Publication date: 21 September 2020

Sinan Çavuşoğlu, Bülent Demirağ and Yakup Durmaz

This paper aims to determine the effects of hedonic shopping value on discounted product purchasing intention.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to determine the effects of hedonic shopping value on discounted product purchasing intention.

Design Methodology Approach

The population of the research consists of consumers who have wanted to benefit from “Magnificent Friday” campaigns or similar campaigns of big shopping malls in Gaziantep between the November 15, 2019 and the December 31, 2019. Out of non-probability sampling methods, convenience sampling method was used in this research. Sample number was determined as 425. To test the hypotheses, Smart partial least squares 3 statistics program was used, and the evaluation of the hypotheses was conducted by using the bootstrapping technique.

Findings

Analyses show that innovation (β = 0.150, p < 0.001), entertainment (β = 0.192, p < 0.001), praise from others (β = 0.234, p < 0.001), escaping reality (β = 0.274, p < 0.001) and social interaction (β = 0.183, p < 0.001) dimensions of hedonic shopping value positively affect discounted product purchasing intention. Accordingly, H1, H2, H3, H4 and H5 were accepted.

Research Limitations Implications

Because the research has time, cost, accessibility and control limitations, the whole population was not reached. The research was only carried out on the data collected from 425 consumers in Gaziantep who benefited from or want to benefit from Magnificent Friday campaign or similar campaigns.

Practical Implications

During discount season when shopping activities are more intense, consumers tend to focus more on the entertainment value and suitability. Because consumers see these seasons as seasons to buy gifts, their interests in and purchasing intention toward products and shops increase. During discount seasons such as Magnificent Friday or New Year’s, businesses may take advantage of consumers who have a tendency for hedonic shopping.

Originality Value

This research studied the effect of hedonic shopping value on purchasing intention and contributed to the literature in this aspect. There have been no studies in national literature hat studied hedonic shopping with such an extent, and there have also been no studies focusing on Magnificent Friday campaigns. For this reason, this research is original in these aspects and thought to contribute to the literature.

Details

Review of International Business and Strategy, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-6014

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Article
Publication date: 22 June 2010

Marilyn Y. Jones, Sonia Vilches‐Montero, Mark T. Spence, Sevgin A. Eroglu and Karen A. Machleit

The purpose of this paper is to present findings from an experiment designed to test the impact of crowding perceptions (both human and spatial), emotions (positive and…

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1923

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present findings from an experiment designed to test the impact of crowding perceptions (both human and spatial), emotions (positive and negative) and shopping values (utilitarian and hedonic) on shopper satisfaction. Culture is explored as a moderating variable with the expectation that it systematically affects perceptions and values, which, in turn, influence the shopper's experience with the store.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected via a 2×2×2 full factorial between subjects design with two variables, one manipulated and one measured. The two manipulated variables were spatial density (high versus low) and human density (high versus low). The measured variable was country of origin, where subjects were coded as either American or Australian.

Findings

Culture moderates the effects of perceived spatial crowding as well as both hedonic and utilitarian shopping values on shopper satisfaction. Specifically, the adverse effect of perceived spatial crowding on shopper satisfaction is less pronounced for Australians than is the case for Americans. With respect to both utilitarian and hedonic shopping values, the positive relationship between shopping values and shopper satisfaction is greater for Australians than for Americans.

Originality/value

Shopping has been generally described by Rintamaki et al. as “relativistic, because it involves preferences among objects, it varies among people, and it is specific to the context”. This paper demonstrates that culture clearly affects shopper's perceptions and shopping values, which in turn affect shopper satisfaction. It is reasonable to speculate that these effects would be even more pronounced had countries with greater cultural distance been examined.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 38 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2011

Svein Ottar Olsen and Kåre Skallerud

This study aims to examine grocery shoppers' beliefs about store attributes as antecedents to shopping value by exploring whether dimensions of store attribute beliefs…

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7091

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine grocery shoppers' beliefs about store attributes as antecedents to shopping value by exploring whether dimensions of store attribute beliefs have differential effects (i.e. strength and direction) on hedonic versus utilitarian shopping value.

Design/methodology/approach

Shoppers at three grocery outlets in a Norwegian city were approached. After they had agreed to participate in the survey, they received a package containing an information letter, the questionnaire, and the pre‐paid return envelope. A total of 572 (60 per cent response rate) questionnaires were returned within two weeks of delivery.

Findings

Findings from a survey of grocery shoppers suggest that one unique store attribute (e.g. personal interaction) can relate negatively to utilitarian shopping value and positively relate to hedonic shopping value, while others (e.g. physical aspects) may have the opposite valence, or direction to the different dimensions of shopping value.

Research limitations/implications

Future studies should also include not only shopping value antecedents, but also consequences such as repatronage intentions and anticipation, satisfaction, loyalty and positive word of mouth.

Practical implications

Developing adaptive selling techniques and combinations of store layouts may be useful strategies to overcome the differential effects of store attributes on shopping values.

Originality/value

This study shows the differential effects that store attributes can have on shopping value. This research extends previous research, which has focused largely on the main effects of store attributes (i.e. one‐dimensional measures of store attributes), by finding support for significant interactions between the two types of shopping value and dimensions of store attributes.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 28 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Timo Rintamäki, Antti Kanto, Hannu Kuusela and Mark T. Spence

The purpose of this paper is to decompose total customer value as perceived by department store shoppers into utilitarian, hedonic and social dimensions, and empirically…

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13753

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to decompose total customer value as perceived by department store shoppers into utilitarian, hedonic and social dimensions, and empirically test this conceptualization in a Finnish department store shopping context.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected by a questionnaire administered over three days at a department store that generates the second largest turnover in Finland. A total of 364 shoppers completed the questionnaire.

Findings

Empirical evidence supports our tripartite conceptualization of total customer value. In particular, social value is an independent construct. Further, social value varies by day‐of‐week, with a significant increase on Saturday (versus weekdays) when the store is more crowded, whereas no such differences in utilitarian and hedonic values were detected.

Originality/value

The principal contribution is a tripartite conceptualization of total customer value that incorporates utilitarian, social and hedonic value dimensions in a department store shopping context. Individually these dimensions are all well rooted in streams of consumer behavior literature, albeit mostly at the product or brand, not the store, level. Increasing our understanding of these softer aspects of shopping, particularly the social dimension, is important because they represent possible differentiating factors in the highly competitive and often commoditized retail markets.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 3 October 2008

Susan H.C. Tai

As the market of Greater China is becoming increasingly important for multinationals, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between the personal…

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4083

Abstract

Purpose

As the market of Greater China is becoming increasingly important for multinationals, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between the personal values and shopping orientation of working adults in Shanghai, Taipei, and Hong Kong.

Design/methodology/approach

The total sample of 454 included adult working Chinese from Shanghai, Taipei, and Hong Kong. Factor analysis was performed to identify separately the shopping orientations and dimensions of the personal values of the subjects. ANOVA analysis was then used to examine the differences among the subjects in terms of their shopping orientation and personal values. Lastly, correlation analysis was used to examine the relationships between dimensions of personal values and shopping orientations.

Findings

As expected, the results showed that Chinese consumers in Greater China shared similar personal values, but differences were found in their shopping orientation. Significant relationships were found between dimensions of personal values and the eight shopping orientations. Among the dimensions of personal values, self‐actualization played a major role in six of the eight shopping orientations, with shopping gender roles and economic shopping being the exceptions. Personalized shopping, advertised specials, and shopping for self‐satisfaction were found to be the three major shopping orientations that were closely related to personal values. Shopping gender roles and economic shopping were found to be unrelated to any personal values as they reflect individual short‐term goals rather than long‐term values.

Research limitations/implications

The Shanghai data were collected using judgment sampling as there are regulations that restrict the distribution of questionnaires in public streets in mainland China, whereas the Taipei and Hong Kong data were collected using random sampling. Different collection methods in the sampling process may have led to a problem regarding the representativeness of the sample.

Practical implications

Among the dimensions of personal values, self‐actualization played a major role in shopping orientation. The self‐actualization needs of consumers could be achieved through smart shopping and bargain hunting, but also through personalized shopping and shopping satisfaction. Because consumer shopping satisfaction is generally not high in Greater China, improvements could be made to enhance shopping satisfaction by providing a shopping environment that enables consumers to demonstrate their intellectual thinking and that meets their self‐actualization needs. Personalized shopping is also important for Chinese consumers who prefer closer personal relationships with salespersons.

Originality/value

Various studies have focused on the classification of the shopping orientations of consumers from different perspectives, but few studies have investigated the influence of personal values on shopping orientation, especially in the Greater China market.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 28 October 2014

Ju-Young M. Kang

The purpose of this paper is to examine: whether monetary, convenience, emotional, and social values were related to utilitarian and hedonic performance expectancies…

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2021

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine: whether monetary, convenience, emotional, and social values were related to utilitarian and hedonic performance expectancies, which were then related to usage intention of augmented reality and motion capture (ARMC) e-shopping via a webcam and whether ego involvement and cognitive effort moderated the links between performance expectancies and usage intention.

Design/methodology/approach

The proposed model was based on Prospect Theory and the Value-Attitude-Behavior hierarchy consumer decision model. The participants were US online apparel shoppers (n=806) and were drawn from an online consumer panel. Structural equation modeling was employed to test the proposed model and research hypotheses.

Findings

This study identified that utilitarian performance expectancy was positively related to usage intention. However, hedonic performance expectancy was not positively related to usage intention. Monetary, convenience, emotional, and social values had an indirect influence on usage intention, mediated by utilitarian performance expectancy. Ego involvement and cognitive effort moderated the link between utilitarian performance expectancy and usage intention. Managerial implications were discussed.

Originality/value

The results not only verify theoretical conceptions regarding usage intention of ARMC e-shopping but also provide beneficial insights into the implementation and development of ARMC e-shopping applications that use webcams and motion capture technology.

Details

International Journal of Clothing Science and Technology, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6222

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Article
Publication date: 10 December 2018

Devinder Pal Singh

The paper aims to investigate materialism as one of the retail shopping motives along with utilitarian/hedonic motivations in the Indian context. It aims to identify the…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to investigate materialism as one of the retail shopping motives along with utilitarian/hedonic motivations in the Indian context. It aims to identify the key shopping motivations, which explain the shopping value in the context of malls. Furthermore, it intends to develop a shopping motivations-based typology of Indian mall shoppers, and to profile the motivational and demographic characteristics of the discerned segments.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were collected through a mall intercept survey. The shopping motivations were identified through literature, and established scales were utilised to collect data. Exploratory factor analysis was used to understand the underlying structure of mall shopping motives. Hierarchical and K-means clustering were used to cluster the consumers. Additionally, ANOVA along with post hoc tests were used to explore the mean differences between the various clusters. Cross-tabulation along with the chi-square statistic was used to understand the demographic characteristics of the clusters.

Findings

Indian mall shoppers are motivated by hedonistic, materialistic and utilitarian motives. They can be primarily classified into four clusters, namely, balanced shoppers, materialist shoppers, hedonistic shoppers and value shoppers.

Research limitations/implications

Knowledge of distinct consumer segments will aid marketers in formulating marketing and promotional strategies for augmenting mall footfalls.

Originality/value

Although past research has accentuated hedonic and utilitarian motivations as the primary shopping motives, little research has been conducted to examine materialism as a shopping motive. Rise of materialism in the emerging Indian market has metamorphosed the consumer behaviour. The study examines the utilitarian, hedonistic and materialistic dimensions of shopping and unfolds a typology of mall shoppers. It contributes to the repository of cross-national research on shopping behaviour by unravelling the shopping motivations of Indian consumers.

Details

Journal of Asia Business Studies, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1558-7894

Keywords

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