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1 – 10 of 79
Article
Publication date: 6 April 2012

Pauline Heslop, Anna Marriott, Peter Fleming, Matt Hoghton and Lesley Russ

This paper seeks to provide a commentary on the previous paper in this issue “Does he have sugar in his tea? Communication between people with learning disabilities, their carers…

594

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to provide a commentary on the previous paper in this issue “Does he have sugar in his tea? Communication between people with learning disabilities, their carers and hospital staff”.

Design/methodology/approach

This commentary outlines some “reasonable adjustments” for people with learning disabilities in primary and secondary care.

Findings

The paper finds that there is a potential for Hospital Passport‐type documents to provide a better link between individuals and primary and secondary healthcare services.

Originality/value

The paper suggests that one way of helping to improve outcomes for people with learning disabilities would be to work more creatively across traditional boundaries.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 October 2011

Pauline Heslop and Anna Marriott

This paper aims to outline the process of undertaking the Confidential Inquiry (CI) into the deaths of people with learning disabilities and discusses three particular issues…

929

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to outline the process of undertaking the Confidential Inquiry (CI) into the deaths of people with learning disabilities and discusses three particular issues: engaging with professionals; maintaining confidentiality; and the tension between wanting to base the findings on a sufficiently large number of cases so that the findings are robust and reliable, but also wanting to make immediate changes to any potentially modifiable factors found to contribute to the deaths of people with learning disabilities.

Design/methodology/approach

The CI into the deaths of people with learning disabilities reviews the deaths of all people with learning disabilities living in the (former) Avon and Gloucestershire areas. It has been commissioned by the Department of Health to run until March 2013. One of the key drivers for a CI has been the work of Mencap in exposing the unequal health care that some people with learning disabilities received in the NHS.

Findings

The principal goal of the CI is to improve the standard and quality of care for people with learning disabilities and ultimately their health outcomes. The CI team aims to detect potentially modifiable contributory factors in the care of a person with learning disabilities who has subsequently died, share any examples of good practice in their care and provide information to guide the commissioning of services.

Originality/value

It is anticipated that the findings of the CI will provide a considerable amount of evidence on which to improve the standard and quality of care for people with learning disabilities and ultimately their health outcomes.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 16 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 October 2015

Anna Marriott, Sue Turner, Sharon Ashby and Deborah Rees

– The purpose of this paper is to describe the role of the screening liaison nurses for adults with learning disabilities employed by Peninsula Community Health.

1761

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the role of the screening liaison nurses for adults with learning disabilities employed by Peninsula Community Health.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reports on the national situation in regard to cancer screening for people with learning disabilities and explores the barriers which limit their participation in these screening programmes. It describes the screening liaison nurse role and presents case examples of the work they do.

Findings

The local screening rates for people with learning disabilities have increased since the creation of this role in 2011.

Originality/value

Increasing the uptake of cancer screening by people with learning disabilities is clearly in line with existing national priorities. To the author’s knowledge this is a unique role in this country and the authors propose that other areas would benefit from adopting this model of working.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Keywords

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present data about the experiences of adults with learning disabilities during the COVID-19 pandemic across the UK.

Design/methodology/approach

Interviews were conducted with 609 adults with learning disabilities. Family carers and support staff of another 351 adults with learning disabilities completed a proxy online survey. The data were collected between December 2020 and February 2021 and concerned both worries/negatives and anything positive that had happened because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Findings

Social isolation was the most commonly reported worry/negative for adults with learning disabilities, with other frequently reported worries/negatives including: changes to/loss of routine; loss of support/services; and decreased health/well-being/fitness. A large proportion of participants indicated that nothing positive had happened because of COVID-19, but some positives were reported, including: digital inclusion; more time spent with important people; improved health/well-being/fitness; and, a slower pace of life.

Practical implications

Future pandemic planning must ensure that adults with learning disabilities are supported to maintain social contact with the people who matter to them and to support their health and well-being (including maintaining access to essential services and activities). Some adults with learning disabilities may benefit from additional support to improve their digital confidence and access. This may in turn enable them to maintain contact with family, friends and support services/activities.

Originality/value

This is the largest study about the experiences of adults with learning disabilities during the COVID-19 pandemic in the UK. The authors primarily collected data directly from adults with learning disabilities and worked with partner organisations of people with learning disabilities throughout the study.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 14 October 2011

Peter McGill

687

Abstract

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 16 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Content available
Article
Publication date: 6 April 2012

Peter McGill

386

Abstract

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Article
Publication date: 24 January 2022

Samantha Flynn, Chris Hatton, Richard P. Hastings, Nikita Hayden, Sue Caton, Pauline Heslop, Andrew Jahoda, Stuart Todd, Edward Oloidi, Stephen Beyer, Peter Mulhall and Laurence Taggart

This paper aims to present data about access to and use of health and social care services by adults with learning disabilities during the COVID-19 pandemic in England, Northern…

364

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present data about access to and use of health and social care services by adults with learning disabilities during the COVID-19 pandemic in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected in three waves between December 2020 and September 2021 and concerned the use of health and social care services during the COVID-19 pandemic. Data were collected at one or more time-points directly from 694 adults with learning disabilities and through separate proxy reports by family carers and paid support staff of another 447 adults with learning disabilities.

Findings

Many people with learning disabilities who reported regularly accessing services/supports pre-pandemic were not receiving them during the timeframe of this study. There were indications of increasing access to some services and supports between Wave 2 and 3, but this was not universal.

Practical implications

People in Cohort 2, who were likely to have severe/profound learning disabilities, were less frequently reported to access online community activities than people in Cohort 1, which is likely to exacerbate existing social isolation for this cohort and their family carers. Service providers should seek to ensure equitable access to services and activities for all people with learning disabilities in the event of future lockdowns or pandemics.

Originality/value

This is the largest longitudinal study about the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on health and social care services for adults with learning disabilities in the UK. We primarily collected data directly from adults with learning disabilities and worked with partner organisations of people with learning disabilities and family members throughout the study.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 May 2018

Anna L. Neatrour, Elizabeth Callaway and Rebekah Cummings

This paper aims to determine if the digital humanities technique of topic modeling would reveal interesting patterns in a corpus of library-themed literature focused on the future…

1302

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to determine if the digital humanities technique of topic modeling would reveal interesting patterns in a corpus of library-themed literature focused on the future of libraries and pioneer a collaboration model in librarian-led digital humanities projects. By developing the project, librarians learned how to better support digital humanities by actually doing digital humanities, as well as gaining insight on the variety of approaches taken by researchers and commenters to the idea of the future of libraries.

Design/methodology/approach

The researchers collected a corpus of over 150 texts (articles, blog posts, book chapters, websites, etc.) that all addressed the future of the library. They ran several instances of latent Dirichlet allocation style topic modeling on the corpus using the programming language R. Once they produced a run in which the topics were cohesive and discrete, they produced word-clouds of the words associated with each topic, visualized topics through time and examined in detail the top five documents associated with each topic.

Findings

The research project provided an effective way for librarians to gain practical experience in digital humanities and develop a greater understanding of collaborative workflows in digital humanities. By examining a corpus of library-themed literature, the researchers gained new insight into how the profession grapples with the idea of the future and an appreciation for topic modeling as a form of literature review.

Originality/value

Topic modeling a future-themed corpus of library literature is a unique research project and provides a way to support collaboration between library faculty and researchers from outside the library.

Details

Digital Library Perspectives, vol. 34 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5816

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 July 2020

Anna L. Neatrour, Jeremy Myntti and Rachel J. Wittmann

When faced with events, such as the global pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), libraries have a unique opportunity to develop a community facing response through…

1390

Abstract

Purpose

When faced with events, such as the global pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), libraries have a unique opportunity to develop a community facing response through born-digital collections. These collections provide challenges for metadata creation, collection development policies, workflows, and digital preservation. This paper aims to provide an overview of the Utah COVID-19 digital collection, with a discussion of impact and lessons learned.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper provides a case study of a born-digital collection initiative undertaken at the University of Utah in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. The project prompted engagement with the University of Utah communities and people across the state. Workflows, metadata management and partnerships are discussed, to provide a model for institutions developing similar projects during a time of crisis.

Findings

While the project was launched with open-ended and flexible goals, the response from the community has been both surprising and gratifying. Statistics and examples demonstrating reuse of collection materials are provided to highlight the impact and potential of community engagement.

Originality/value

Digital collecting projects during a historical event are not new, however the restrictions placed upon people worldwide during the COVID-19 pandemic created interesting circumstances for building this collection. Several lessons were learned throughout the project which will be useful for other institutions embarking upon related projects.

Details

Digital Library Perspectives, vol. 36 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5816

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2021

Samantha Flynn and Chris Hatton

This paper aims to present data about access to health and social care services during the COVID-19 pandemic for adults with learning disabilities across England, Northern…

837

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present data about access to health and social care services during the COVID-19 pandemic for adults with learning disabilities across England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected directly from 621 adults with learning disabilities and through separate proxy reports by family carers and paid support staff of another 378 adults with learning disabilities. The data were collected between December 2020 and February 2021 and concerned the use of health and social care services since the start of the first COVID-19 national lockdown in March 2020.

Findings

Access to and use of health and social care services significantly reduced for adults with learning disabilities across the UK during the COVID-19 pandemic between March 2020 and February 2021, with many people not receiving any services at all during that period. Similar patterns were seen across England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales. However, data suggest some variations between countries for some services.

Practical implications

Future pandemic planning must ensure that access to these essential services is not completely lost for adults with learning disabilities and their family carers, as it was in some cases during the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020.

Originality/value

This is the largest study about the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on health and social care services for adults with learning disabilities in the UK. The authors primarily collected data directly from adults with learning disabilities, and worked with partner organisations of people with learning disabilities throughout the study.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Keywords

1 – 10 of 79