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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2022

Edar da Silva Añaña, Gustavo da Rosa Borges and Jonas Fernando Petry

This study aims to evaluate the factors influencing certain negative feelings, such as social isolation disorder and loneliness, on consumers’ intentions to travel for tourism.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to evaluate the factors influencing certain negative feelings, such as social isolation disorder and loneliness, on consumers’ intentions to travel for tourism.

Design/methodology/approach

This quantitative research used a survey questionnaire composed of eight interval evaluation questions and six demographic variables for the data collection. A total of 290 usable responses were gathered from social networks. The evaluation of the Measurement Model adjustment and the verification of the research hypothesis was done by a structural equations modeling.

Findings

The results reveal that social isolation is not a monolithic construction; instead of that, it is a construct formed by two interrelated factors, the social isolation itself, involving the individual and her/his personality, and the social integration, a factor of situational order, referring to the relations of the individual with his reference group. Factors are influenced by the ease/difficulty of the individual, in cultivating relationships with other people and significantly influence the intention to travel for tourism.

Practical implications

The study contributes to tourism management by breaking the phenomenon down into two dimensions and evaluating the impact of each of them on consumer attitudes, which should be very useful for the segmentation and positioning of tourism products.

Originality/value

Results support the evidence reported by Murphy, who found that people tend to want to make friends, but that this tendency did not appear to be evident about travel and supported Hawthorne’s findings, that the more socially isolated people are, the less they will want to interact with others, demonstrating that social isolation is indeed an inhibitor of social interaction.

Details

Consumer Behavior in Tourism and Hospitality, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2752-6666

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 June 2019

Sushant Ranjan and Rama Shankar Yadav

The purpose of this paper is to develop and empirically validate items on social isolation. The comprehensive literature review of existing studies on the measures of…

1146

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop and empirically validate items on social isolation. The comprehensive literature review of existing studies on the measures of social isolation, loneliness and the related construct was conducted. The paper seeks to conceptualize, validate and present items to measure social isolation.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on theoretical and empirical investigation of the measures of social isolation, loneliness and related constructs such as social others, social loneliness and feeling of sociability. The items were generated through theoretical exploration of previous literature and later modified. The author examined the items through exploratory factor analysis, confirmatory factor analysis and further checked for external criterion validity. Data collected from 128 individuals, in India, were examined to design and validate the scale.

Findings

The finding of the paper is a ten-item social isolation scale. Using structural equation modeling, we have found extraversion and well-being significantly associated with final items in the present study, confirming the external quality of the scale.

Practical implications

Organizations may benefit by close examination of the presence of social isolation in employees along with providing support and assistance to employees so as to reduce negative consequences of social isolation and can address the well-being of the employee.

Originality/value

There is a dearth of developed and validated measures of social isolation in the literature. The study reveals the conceptualization and empirical validation of measures of social isolation in the Indian context so that researchers can move forward to develop theories on social isolation.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 September 2014

Love M. Chile, Xavier M. Black and Carol Neill

The purpose of this paper is to examine the significance of social isolation and the factors that create social isolation for residents of inner-city high-rise apartment…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the significance of social isolation and the factors that create social isolation for residents of inner-city high-rise apartment communities. We critically examine how the physical environment and perceptions of safety in apartment buildings and the inner-city implicate the quality of interactions between residents and with their neighbourhood community.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used mixed-methods consisting of survey questionnaires supplemented by semi-structured interviews and focus group discussions using stratified random sampling to access predetermined key strata of inner-city high-rise resident population. Using coefficient of correlation we examine the significance of the association between social isolation, age and ethnicity amongst Auckland's inner-city high-rise residents.

Findings

The authors found the experience and expression of social isolation consistent across all age groups, with highest correlation between functional social isolation and “being student”, and older adults (60+ years), length of tenure in current apartment and length of time residents have lived in the inner-city.

Research limitations/implications

As a case study, we did not seek in this research to compare the experience and expressions of social isolation in different inner-city contexts, nor of inner-city high-rise residents in New Zealand and other countries, although these will be useful areas to explore in future studies.

Practical implications

This study is a useful starting point to build evidence base for professionals working in health and social care services to develop interventions that will help reduce functional social isolation amongst young adults and older adults in inner-city high-rise apartments. This is particularly important as the inner-city population of older adults grow due to international migration, and sub-national shifts from suburbs to the inner-cities in response to governmental policies of urban consolidation.

Originality/value

By identifying two forms of social isolation, namely functional and structural social isolation, we have extended previous analysis of social isolation and found that “living alone” or structural social isolation did not necessarily lead to functional social isolation. It also touched on the links between functional social isolation and self-efficacy of older adults, particularly those from immigrant backgrounds.

Article
Publication date: 12 September 2019

Shanthi Johnson, Juanita Bacsu, Tom McIntosh, Bonnie Jeffery and Nuelle Novik

Social isolation and loneliness are global issues experienced by many seniors, especially immigrant and refugee seniors. Guided by the five-stage methodological framework…

3354

Abstract

Purpose

Social isolation and loneliness are global issues experienced by many seniors, especially immigrant and refugee seniors. Guided by the five-stage methodological framework proposed by Arksey and O’Malley and more recently Levac, Colquhoun and O’Brien, the purpose of this paper is to explore the existing literature on social isolation and loneliness among immigrant and refugee seniors in Canada.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted a literature search of several databases including: PubMed; MEDLINE; CINAHL; Web of Science; HealthStar Ovid; PschyInfo Ovid; Social Services Abstracts; AgeLine; Public Health Database, Google Scholar and Cochrane Library. In total, 17 articles met the inclusion criteria.

Findings

Based on the current literature five themes related to social isolation and loneliness emerged: loss; living arrangements; dependency; barriers and challenges; and family conflict.

Research limitations/implications

Given the increasing demographic of aging immigrants in Canada, it is useful to highlight existing knowledge on social isolation and loneliness to facilitate research, policy and programs to support this growing population.

Practical implications

The population is aging around the world and it is also becoming increasingly diverse particularly in the high-income country context. Understanding and addressing social isolation is important for immigrant and refugee seniors, given the sociocultural and other differences.

Social implications

Social isolation is a waste of human resource and value created by seniors in the communities.

Originality/value

The paper makes a unique contribution by focusing on immigrant and refugee seniors.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 March 2018

Roser Beneito-Montagut, Nizaiá Cassián-Yde and Arantza Begueria

Social isolation and loneliness are recognised social, health and wellbeing problems that particularly affect later life. They have been the subject of many recent…

2070

Abstract

Purpose

Social isolation and loneliness are recognised social, health and wellbeing problems that particularly affect later life. They have been the subject of many recent studies. Studies examining the role of the internet in addressing these problems have multiplied. However, it is still not known whether internet-mediated social interaction has any role in mitigating social isolation and or loneliness. To address this gap, the purpose of this paper is to review previous research that investigates the relationship between internet use for communication and social isolation and loneliness.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reviews the empirical literature published since 2000 and expands on previous literature reviews by including a variety of research designs and disciplines.

Findings

Despite the recent increase in studies, there is still little evidence to show internet effects on social isolation and loneliness. It is concluded that future research programmes aimed at reducing them by the use of the internet should include more robust methodological and theoretical frameworks, employ longitudinal research designs and provide a more nuanced description of both the social phenomena (social isolation and loneliness) and internet-mediated social interaction.

Originality/value

Previous reviews are not restricted to internet-based studies and include several types of interventions aiming at reducing social isolation and/or loneliness. They do not attempt to disentangle the internet effects of social isolation and loneliness.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 November 2017

Kathleen Bentein, Alice Garcia, Sylvie Guerrero and Olivier Herrbach

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the consequences of experiencing social isolation in a context of dirty work. Relying on an integration of the job…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the consequences of experiencing social isolation in a context of dirty work. Relying on an integration of the job demands-resources model (Schaufeli and Bakker, 2004) with the social identity approach (Ashforth and Kreiner, 1999), the paper posits that perceived social isolation prevents the development of defense mechanisms that could counter the occupational stigma, and thus tends to increase perceptions of stigmatization, and to decrease perceptions of the prosocial impact of their work. Through these two perceptions, perceived social isolation indirectly affects emotional exhaustion and work engagement.

Design/methodology/approach

Research hypotheses are tested among a sample of 195 workers in the commercial cleaning industry who execute physically tainted tasks.

Findings

Results support the research model. Perceived prosocial impact mediates the negative relationship between perceived social isolation and work engagement, and perceived stigmatization mediates the positive relationship between perceived social isolation and emotional exhaustion.

Research limitations/implications

This research contributes to the dirty work literature by empirically examining one of its implicit assumptions, namely, that social isolation prevents the development of coping strategies. It also contributes to the literature on well-being and work engagement by demonstrating how they are affected by the social context of work.

Originality/value

The present paper is the first to study the specific challenges of social isolation in dirty work occupations and its consequences.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 46 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 August 2022

Pilar Mosquera, Maria Eduarda Soares and Teresa Alvadia

The well-being of individuals is an essential issue of sustainability research. This study aims to focus on the particular case of teleworkers and the work conditions…

Abstract

Purpose

The well-being of individuals is an essential issue of sustainability research. This study aims to focus on the particular case of teleworkers and the work conditions which may hinder their well-being. More specifically, this study analyses the impact of social isolation and work overload on the work engagement and life satisfaction of teleworkers during COVID-19 pandemic.

Design/methodology/approach

With a sample of 188 workers from the Portuguese banking sector, the authors use structural equations modelling to test a conceptual model. The authors carry out data analysis with partial least squares.

Findings

Social isolation and work overload are both negatively associated with the three dimensions of work engagement, namely, vigour, absorption and dedication. In turn, vigour is positively associated with life satisfaction. Social isolation and work overload are indirectly associated with life satisfaction through vigour. Results from multi-group analysis show that the negative relationship between social isolation and dedication is stronger for less senior teleworkers. By contrast, the negative relationship between work overload and dedication is stronger for more senior teleworkers. Additionally, the positive relationship between vigour and life satisfaction is stronger for permanent workers than for temporary ones.

Originality/value

This study tests the assumptions of the job demands-resources under the novel conditions of telework during COVID-19, focusing its ubiquitous conditions – social isolation and work overload. For human resources managers, this study highlights the need to take seniority and job stability in consideration when devising onboarding and working arrangement strategies for teleworkers.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 29 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 March 2022

Sajani Thapa, Francisco Guzmán and Audhesh K. Paswan

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how consumers’ luxury purchase behavior has been affected by COVID-19. A theoretical framework is proposed to determine how…

1145

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how consumers’ luxury purchase behavior has been affected by COVID-19. A theoretical framework is proposed to determine how isolation leads to intention to purchase luxury brands through bandwagon luxury consumption behavior. Additionally, the moderating effects of COVID-19 anxiety and social capital on the relationship between bandwagon luxury consumption behavior and subjective well-being and intention to purchase luxury brands are tested.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey responses from a national sample of 261 luxury consumers in the USA were collected. The data were analyzed using a covariance-based structural equation modeling technique.

Findings

The results confirm that the feeling of isolation leads to a higher intention to purchase luxury brands. Both COVID-19 anxiety and social capital moderate the relationship between bandwagon luxury consumption behavior and intention to purchase luxury brands/subjective well-being related to the luxury brand purchase.

Research limitations/implications

Luxury marketers should focus on highlighting bandwagon elements of their brands, such as their popularity and how they enhance social connectedness when tailoring their brand communication to isolated consumers. The data is limited to luxury consumers in the USA; thus, the findings are specific to the US market.

Originality/value

Given the paucity of research on luxury consumption for isolated consumers, this study adds to the literature on luxury brands by examining how the feeling of isolation affects the intention to purchase luxury brands.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 31 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2020

Nashaat H. Hussein

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the way people in a collectivist culture, particularly Egyptians, define social isolation and to understand the effect of social

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the way people in a collectivist culture, particularly Egyptians, define social isolation and to understand the effect of social isolation on maintaining traditional networks of social relations.

Design/methodology/approach

To do this, online ethnographic semi-structured interviews were carried out with a purposeful sample of non-infected Egyptians who have access to social media networks.

Findings

Although collectivism may be perceived as a risk factor in developing countries, it has positive effects on reducing the spread of COVID-19 among Egyptians through the preventive measures it entails. Increased fear, worries and anxiety about the family and in-group members is a limiting factor against the prevalence of the disease, despite the emotional hardships experienced by individuals.

Research limitations/implications

The sample interviewed does not refer to the entire Egyptian population, since the number of social media users represents 43.5% of Egyptians. Therefore, generalization of research data may be problematic.

Practical implications

The paper aims to raise awareness of the important of stressing collectivist character traits since they can help develop more preventive measures against the spread of the disease. Research findings also indicate that there is a need to coexist with the disease under controlled conditions to lessen the psychological risks of social isolation.

Originality/value

In light of the paucity of research carried out on COVID-19, the present research provides a pioneering insight into the meaning of social isolation in a collectivist culture and the distinctive local methods adopted by people to maintain their networks of social relations.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 42 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Toby Smith

The purpose of this paper is to explore the concepts of social isolation and loneliness in relation to people with chronic musculoskeletal pain. Through these concepts…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the concepts of social isolation and loneliness in relation to people with chronic musculoskeletal pain. Through these concepts, biological, psychological and social factors will be examined to consider how we can identify people at risk of social isolation and loneliness who have chronic musculoskeletal pain and then how health professionals may intervene to reduce their effects.

Design/methodology/approach

Conceptual paper.

Findings

Social isolation and loneliness are often evident in the situation of people with chronic musculoskeletal diseases. This may be bi-directional where pains may lead to social isolation and loneliness, but equally, social isolation and loneliness may exacerbate pain. Interventions to improve the symptoms of chronic musculoskeletal pain, and also approaches around social participation and engagement should be adopted in combination to ameliorate this potentially disabling scenario.

Originality/value

There remains limited evidence around the prevalence and management of social isolation and loneliness for people with chronic musculoskeletal pain. By raising awareness of social isolation and loneliness in this population, people with chronic musculoskeletal pain may be better supported to reduce the negative impact that social isolation and loneliness can have on their health and well-being.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Keywords

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