Search results

1 – 10 of 522
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 6 April 2012

Ruth Bell

This study seeks to evaluate a Hospital Passport tool designed to provide information and improve communication between people with learning disabilities and hospital staff.

Downloads
3957

Abstract

Purpose

This study seeks to evaluate a Hospital Passport tool designed to provide information and improve communication between people with learning disabilities and hospital staff.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is a qualitative study, which explores people's experiences of good and bad communication in hospital and their experiences of how a Hospital Passport impacts on that process of communication.

Findings

The paper finds that a Hospital Passport can act as a useful multi‐agency resource to improve communication and continuity of care for people with learning disabilities.

Originality/value

The study leads to insights and suggestions for health and social care professionals and organisations as to how communication can be improved to benefit vulnerable groups in hospital.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 6 April 2012

Pauline Heslop, Anna Marriott, Peter Fleming, Matt Hoghton and Lesley Russ

This paper seeks to provide a commentary on the previous paper in this issue “Does he have sugar in his tea? Communication between people with learning disabilities, their…

Downloads
547

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to provide a commentary on the previous paper in this issue “Does he have sugar in his tea? Communication between people with learning disabilities, their carers and hospital staff”.

Design/methodology/approach

This commentary outlines some “reasonable adjustments” for people with learning disabilities in primary and secondary care.

Findings

The paper finds that there is a potential for Hospital Passport‐type documents to provide a better link between individuals and primary and secondary healthcare services.

Originality/value

The paper suggests that one way of helping to improve outcomes for people with learning disabilities would be to work more creatively across traditional boundaries.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 November 2018

Alice Owen

The current project aims to draft an NHS and care provider joint working protocol for patients with learning disabilities as they transition between care and NHS hospital

Abstract

Purpose

The current project aims to draft an NHS and care provider joint working protocol for patients with learning disabilities as they transition between care and NHS hospital services. The purpose of this paper is to present the rationale behind a joint working protocol and the progress of the project to date.

Design/methodology/approach

Working in partnership, Basildon University Hospital and Estuary Housing Association have sought to investigate the experiences in hospital of the people they support with learning disabilities. This has involved ongoing work examining patient pathways from both a hospital and care provider perspective as well as engaging in discussions with key stakeholders. It is hoped that these insights will feed into recommendations to form the joint working protocol.

Findings

Current findings are limited as this paper presents an interim report on an ongoing project. Initial findings around positive joint working practices are detailed. An emerging recommendation around improved information sharing between health and care provider in acute hospital settings is also discussed.

Originality/value

It is hoped that the project will improve experiences of people with learning disabilities in hospital locally, while inspiring other hospitals and care providers to adopt a joint working approach at a wider level.

Details

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 21 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 6 May 2020

Alice Durrant

In total, 40% of the deaths of patients with learning disabilities have been classed as avoidable, and there is a known increased risk of harm while inpatients in hospital

Abstract

Purpose

In total, 40% of the deaths of patients with learning disabilities have been classed as avoidable, and there is a known increased risk of harm while inpatients in hospital. This paper aims to look at the current experiences and treatment of people with learning disabilities within a general hospital setting to examine factors that affect their care.

Design/methodology/approach

A comprehensive literature search was conducted of primary research between 2013 and 2019 to evaluate what is known about the quality of care and treatment that learning disabled patients experience within a general hospital.

Findings

The research suggests that people with learning disabilities receive haphazard care in hospital settings, with inconsistent implementation of reasonable adjustments, insufficient arrangements to support family and other carer input, and poor knowledge of learning disability amongst hospital staff.

Originality/value

Previously, reviews focussing on hospital care have mainly focussed on access to health care rather than its delivery. This review has found evidence of significant failings in delivering care to this patient group, identifying a gap of knowledge in this field regardless of policies and laws already in place. There should be stricter monitoring of the Equality Act’s enforcement, along with improved and mandatory training for all general health-care staff. It is crucial that health-care professionals learn from mistakes to improve the care and experiences of learning disabled inpatients.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 10 May 2013

Colin Hemmings, Shaymaa Obousy and Tom Craig

The use of accessible, portable, mental health crisis information in people with intellectual disabilities has not been previously reported. The purpose of this paper is…

Downloads
345

Abstract

Purpose

The use of accessible, portable, mental health crisis information in people with intellectual disabilities has not been previously reported. The purpose of this paper is to explore whether crisis information could be modified to be made accessible and meaningful for people with intellectual disabilities.

Design/methodology/approach

Personalized information to help in a mental health crisis was recorded on folded A4 sized sheets that could be carried in a conveniently sized wallet.

Findings

Three quarters of the participants carried their crisis information wallets on a daily basis for six months before evaluation. They and their carers expressed positive feedback about them carrying the crisis information. No one carrying the information actually experienced a mental health crisis in the six months follow up period so their usefulness in such crises could not be evaluated. However, they were unexpectedly used in other non‐mental health settings and reported to have been helpful.

Originality/value

The sample size in this was small but the findings suggested that the carrying of crisis information might be a helpful measure for some people with intellectual disabilities. A further, larger scale trial is warranted.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 2 January 2018

Susannah Baines and Chris Hatton

People with learning disabilities are at risk of poor health and premature death. Due to these inequalities, NHS trusts are required to make reasonable adjustments to…

Abstract

Purpose

People with learning disabilities are at risk of poor health and premature death. Due to these inequalities, NHS trusts are required to make reasonable adjustments to their care, such as longer appointment times, with the legal duty on them being “anticipatory”. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Secondary analysis of CQC acute hospital inspection reports asking the following research questions: Do CQC inspection reports mention people with learning disabilities? Where issues concerning people with learning disabilities are reported in CQC hospital inspection reports, what issues and reasonable adjustments are reported? Are there any relationships between comments made in the inspection reports and CQC ratings of the trusts?

Findings

In total, 29 of the 30 trust-wide inspection reports (97 per cent) and 58 of the 61 specific site reports (95 per cent) included at least one mention of people with learning disability/ies. Most comments about practices for people with learning disabilities were positive across all CQC inspection output types and across all CQC overall ratings, although the proportion of positive comments decreased and the proportion of negative comments increased as CQC ratings became less positive.

Research limitations/implications

Overall the authors found that CQC inspection reports routinely contained some information regarding how well the hospitals were working for people with learning disabilities. The depth of information in reports varied across trusts, with the potential for CQC reports to more consistently report information collected during inspections.

Originality/value

The report updates and extends a report published by the Public Health England Learning Disabilities Observatory in 2015.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 28 October 2014

Nick Walsh, Tricia Handley and Ian Hall

The purpose of this paper is to address the serious problems that people with intellectual disability face in getting their healthcare needs met in general hospitals by…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address the serious problems that people with intellectual disability face in getting their healthcare needs met in general hospitals by improving the training of general hospital staff.

Design/methodology/approach

Review of recent developments in models of service provision including the development of intellectual disability liaison nurses and the RAID model in liaison psychiatry.

Findings

There is much scope for intellectual disability liaison nurses and liaison psychiatry services to work together in staff training in general hospitals. There is a clear strategic role for both services in convincing the management of general hospitals to implement such training using economic and quality arguments.

Originality/value

The authors suggest a new model of working to improve the healthcare outcomes of people with intellectual disabilities through effective training of staff in general hospitals.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 8 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 16 November 2012

Stevie Read and Tristan Johnson

There is significant literature to demonstrate that people with intellectual disabilities are at higher risk of premature death, however there is relatively little…

Abstract

Purpose

There is significant literature to demonstrate that people with intellectual disabilities are at higher risk of premature death, however there is relatively little evidence of research carried out on risk assessment in hospital for this patient group. This paper aims to share the outcomes from a patient safety project conducted in an acute hospital by the Trust's intellectual disabilities team.

Design/methodology/approach

A project structure was used, supported by the Trust patient safety team through association with the National Institute for Innovation and Improvement: leading improvement in patient safety (LIPS) programme. The aim of the project was to bring together the current evidence, to understand the risk issues for this group and develop a robust risk assessment tool that could be embedded into the care processes in acute hospitals.

Findings

A six month pilot concluded that a short assessment in a familiar format was more likely to be used by nurses. Risk assessment on its own does not deliver better and safer care. It must be accompanied by a series of clear, evidence based actions that used together ensure the patients' total safety and care needs are met. This tool is used throughout the Trust and in a number of other hospitals across the eastern region. Its use has contributed to reducing length of stay and improving health outcomes.

Research limitations/implications

The paper shows the need for further research and data gathering.

Originality/value

This study demonstrates that risk for patients with intellectual disabilities in hospital is complex. Education is essential to underpin new assessment tools for clinical practice.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 6 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 10 May 2013

Heidi Emery, Bridget Jones and Eddie Chaplin

This paper describes an ongoing process of engagement with carers of people with intellectual disabilities currently being monitored by an out of area service for both…

Downloads
185

Abstract

Purpose

This paper describes an ongoing process of engagement with carers of people with intellectual disabilities currently being monitored by an out of area service for both carers of people placed both in area and out of area within a local Mental Health Learning Disabilities team in South London.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a series of consultation events, carers were asked to participate in a free dialogue which focussed on everyday issues for carers. This included financial implications of caring, knowledge of care pathways/systems in care, carer's needs and expectations and the support they currently receive.

Findings

This paper highlighted a number of issues and concerns that carers face in their daily lives when supporting one or more people. These include lack of recognition, financial difficulties, lack of training and support.

Originality/value

This project offered a valuable insight into current carer perceptions and will help develop further discussion and promote greater engagement by services and mutual understanding with this often neglected group.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 28 October 2014

Anna Walder, Robert Green and Sujata Soni

The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the difficulties patients with intellectual disabilities face when they present to a general hospital with ambiguous symptoms…

Downloads
247

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the difficulties patients with intellectual disabilities face when they present to a general hospital with ambiguous symptoms and highlights the importance of adequate training for general staff in caring for people with learning disabilities.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors describe the pathway of a person with a learning disability and mental health problems from A&E, through a general hospital, to discharge and the problems encountered in terms of diagnostic clarity and subsequent treatment.

Findings

Delay in recognising a psychiatric cause for his symptoms and wrongly attributing his symptoms to his learning disability may have led to a protracted admission and invasive tests.

Originality/value

Education of healthcare professionals and proactive liaison work can help improve outcomes for people with intellectual disabilities when they are admitted to generic services.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 8 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

Keywords

1 – 10 of 522