Search results

1 – 10 of over 29000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 26 October 2012

Holley Long

This paper aims to elucidate the value of opening up digital collections for end‐user development of mash‐ups and to evaluate the suitability of libraries' infrastructure…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to elucidate the value of opening up digital collections for end‐user development of mash‐ups and to evaluate the suitability of libraries' infrastructure for this purpose.

Design/methodology/approach

The author surveyed ARL members' digital collection platforms to assess the terms of use statements and options for programmatic access.

Findings

The findings show that 17 per cent of the institutions surveyed offer some means for mashing up digital collections, and that, while more than half the collections surveyed have some form of terms of use or rights statements, they were not written to support this type of use case.

Research limitations/implications

Results of the research suggest that a mashable digital collection service is feasible for most libraries.

Originality/value

This paper will be of interest to librarians who are considering providing application programming interface (API) access to their digital collections.

Details

OCLC Systems & Services: International digital library perspectives, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-075X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Bárbara Susana Sánchez Vignau and Ileana Lourdes Presno Quesada

This paper discusses the topic of Collection Development in a digital environment. Developing digital collections is a logical consequence of inserting information…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper discusses the topic of Collection Development in a digital environment. Developing digital collections is a logical consequence of inserting information technologies in organizations. The usual route towards other models of libraries has allowed the development of the digital collections as a source of Digital Libraries.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on the development of a user‐oriented concept of digital collections.

Findings

The current information society requires Collection Development to guarantee suitable resources in information organizations.

Originality/value

The authors provide a new way of looking at the development of digital collections. In this paper the authors propose a cycle to create a digital collection starting from the established precepts for traditional Collection Development. The creation process is supplemented with an analysis of the term Collection Development starting from the user's focus.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 March 2018

Wendy Walker and Teressa Keenan

The purpose of this paper is to describe methods for restructuring workflows and efficiently using staff members and volunteers to continue work on multiple, simultaneous…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe methods for restructuring workflows and efficiently using staff members and volunteers to continue work on multiple, simultaneous digital collections as budgets and resources decline.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper describes one library’s varied approaches to several digital collections supported by literature or volunteers in libraries.

Findings

In the face of continually declining resources and new, time-sensitive priorities and compliance responsibilities, librarians can continue to maintain digital collections by modifying workflows, using the services of volunteers and communicating strategically.

Practical implications

This paper is relevant to librarians, archivists and others who are looking for ways to justify and capitalize on the use of unconventional personnel in digital collections programs.

Originality/value

This paper presents a case of the successful use of volunteers to accomplish digital collections-related tasks in an academic library and provides a communication-based strategy for addressing some of the challenges related to volunteers in academic libraries.

Details

Digital Library Perspectives, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5816

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 24 April 2009

Ali Shiri and Sarah Chase‐Kruszewski

The purpose of this paper is to report an investigation into the types of knowledge organisation systems (KOSs) utilised in North American digital library collections.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report an investigation into the types of knowledge organisation systems (KOSs) utilised in North American digital library collections.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper identifies, analyses and deep scans online North American hosted digital libraries. It reviews the literature related to the application of KOSs on the web, identifies widely used KOSs and tools and reviews the literature related to collaborative collections on the web.

Findings

A total of 269 North American digital library collections were examined. The Library of Congress Subject Headings is the most widely used subject representation tool, followed by domain‐specific thesauri, 113 digital library collections make use of locally developed taxonomies. A few collections use the Dewy Decimal Classification and alphabetical indexes.

Research limitations/implications

This research was limited to North American digital library collections.

Practical implications

The findings show the popular KOSs used in digital library collections. It also shows the organisational contexts of the examined digital library collections.

Originality/value

This research contributes to the areas of digital libraries and to the application of KOSs and services for subject representation and access.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 1 June 2018

Kate Dohe and Robin Pike

Project management techniques for digital initiatives must shift with the transformation of content from analog to digital, from singular projects to mass-digitization and…

Abstract

Purpose

Project management techniques for digital initiatives must shift with the transformation of content from analog to digital, from singular projects to mass-digitization and large-scale digital preservation. How are project management methods employed across digital practices, from digitization, to online access, to preservation? How can project management methods evolve to create a collaborative workflow across collection and service areas of librarianship, centered on digital stewardship?

Methodology/approach

Solutions for these questions are illustrated in an explanation of the workflows implemented at the University of Maryland, College Park Libraries and reflected upon in a case study of a recent digital initiative.

Findings

Centered on the efforts of two departments in the Libraries’ Digital Systems and Stewardship division, this chapter outlines the origins, techniques, and integration of digital project management with a focus on Waterfall and Agile project management. Furthermore, the integration and transition of project management methodologies and tools between groups is emphasized, mirroring the transformation of analog media to digital formats and the requisite shifts in thinking such projects require.

Originality/value

These case studies are based on research across the profession and implementation at the University of Maryland, College Park Libraries. The local application of two established project management techniques, Waterfall and Agile, are summarized and compared. Though regularly employed in application development, applying Agile project management in libraries is a relatively new practice and has not been widely documented in library literature.

Details

Project Management in the Library Workplace
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-837-4

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 8 October 2018

Mark Dahl

Because of online digital resources, academic libraries no longer need to spend as much time and energy organizing their own collections as they used to. They now have an…

Abstract

Because of online digital resources, academic libraries no longer need to spend as much time and energy organizing their own collections as they used to. They now have an opportunity to pivot their expertise in organizing information outward. “Inside-out” library services can include support for special collections, digital scholarship, scholarly communication, and data management. A key characteristic of such services is that an academic library takes on broader information management challenges at their college or university. This chapter will examine what it takes to build successful inside-out library services by looking at their cost, how well they complement existing library expertise and culture, and their impact on teaching, research, and the wider community.

Details

Challenging the “Jacks of All Trades but Masters of None” Librarian Syndrome
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-903-4

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 5 December 2008

Jeffrey Pomerantz, Songphan Choemprayong and Lori Eakin

This chapter traces the history of digital libraries (DLs) in the United States through the funding sources that have supported DL research and development over the past…

Abstract

This chapter traces the history of digital libraries (DLs) in the United States through the funding sources that have supported DL research and development over the past decade and a half. A set of related questions are addressed: How have the mission and goals of funding agencies affected the types of projects that have been funded? What have been the deliverables from funded projects and how have the goals of the funding agencies shaped those deliverables? Funding agencies have exerted strong influence over research and development in DLs, and different funding agencies have funded different types of projects, with varying sets of concerns for driving the various fields that feed into DLs. This chapter will address the impact that DL funding has had on the development of research in the field of Library and Information Science, as well as on the practice of librarianship.

Details

Influence of Funding on Advances in Librarianship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-373-6

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 24 August 2010

Elizabeth A. Novara

The purpose of this paper is to address the challenges that special collections repositories face when creating digital surrogates driven by researcher demand, to link…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address the challenges that special collections repositories face when creating digital surrogates driven by researcher demand, to link these digitization issues with archival practice, and to provide recommendations for improvement.

Design/methodology/approach

Presents an overview of the development of the University of Maryland Libraries' digital imaging workflows and a critique of current practices.

Findings

A viable digital repository can be built from surrogates created in response to researcher demand, but there are limitations to this approach, with opportunity for improvement.

Research limitations/implications

As a case study, this paper is limited to one institution's perspective.

Practical implications

Provides insight into constructing and managing digitization programs at special collections repositories.

Originality/value

This paper offers a case study approach for an institutional digital repository influenced heavily by researcher demand, in contrast to a digital repository constructed with a more structured plan.

Details

OCLC Systems & Services: International digital library perspectives, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-075X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 19 April 2011

John Walsh

This paper attempts to explain the wide dissemination of Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH) within digital libraries and presents some of the advantages and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper attempts to explain the wide dissemination of Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH) within digital libraries and presents some of the advantages and disadvantages of using this controlled vocabulary in digital collections. The paper also presents other classifications used in digital collections for subject access and explores ways of improving search functionality in digital collections that employ LCSH.

Design/methodology/approach

Unlike traditional libraries that use Library of Congress Classification for organization and retrieval, digital libraries use metadata forms for organization and retrieval. The collections exist in cyberspace of the internet which is known for containing the universe of knowledge. The use of LCSH for information retrieval has been widely criticized for its difficulty of use and its information retrieval effectiveness in online environments. The Library of Congress (LOC) has claimed the headings were not based on comprehensive principles nor ever intended to cover the universe of knowledge. Despite these claims and criticisms, LCSH is the most popular choice for subject access in digital libraries.

Findings

The number of digital collections increases every year and LCSH is still the most popular choice of controlled vocabulary for subject access. Of the numerous criticisms, difficulties of use and user unfamiliarity are the greatest disadvantages of using LCSH for subject access. Average users only have a vague notion of what they are looking for when initializing a search. More work is required in automated generation of subject headings and increased usage of LCSH in faceted search retrieval systems. This will provide users with better access to the LCSH used in the back end of information retrieval.

Originality/value

The Greek researchers who developed the Dissertation DSPace system believe this type of module will eventually replace the traditional keyword‐based indexing back ends employed by many information retrieval modules within current digital library systems. The system offers the type of access and interactivity that will acquaint users with how LCSH looks and is used. Faceted search and automated pattern matching using an ontology based on LCSH have the best promise of overcoming the disadvantages that have always plagued the LOC‐controlled vocabulary. These retrieval techniques give LCSH an opportunity to finally achieve the optimal precision and recall it has so far failed to deliver.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 6 May 2014

Alexandra Dolan-Mescal, Marcie Farwell, Sara Howard, Jessica Rozler and Matthew Smith

This paper aimed to conduct an inventory of digital resources for the Queens College Special Collections and Archives and had two purposes. The first was to assess the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aimed to conduct an inventory of digital resources for the Queens College Special Collections and Archives and had two purposes. The first was to assess the digital resources for a department too understaffed to address digital preservation and to provide a step-by-step program for them to start thinking in the long-term. The second was to show how these steps can be generalized for many institutions just starting to have digital holdings and looking to create a long-term digital preservation plan.

Design/methodology/approach

The main method for research involved taking a significant sampling of the department’s digital holdings and conducting an inventory of them, analyzing such characteristics as file size, names, formats and metadata. After the inventory was conducted, recommendations were made to the department based on best practices in the field of digital preservation.

Findings

We found that while the department generally does not follow industry-best practices for preservation, the files were relatively new and, therefore, many issues could still be fixed. With a concrete plan and a bit of effort, their digital files can be more easily accessible and protected against future threats.

Originality/value

The issues that the Department of Special Collections had with their digital holdings are similar to those at many other institutions – especially educational ones where staff turnover is high. This case study could help similar small organizations start to access their digital holdings and start formulating a plan for long-term preservation.

Details

OCLC Systems & Services: International digital library perspectives, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-075X

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 29000