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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1998

Angele L. M. Cavaye

The use of a multi‐disciplinary research team can often enhance the investigation of IS phenomena ‐ particularly when the construct under study is multi‐dimensional. This paper…

Abstract

The use of a multi‐disciplinary research team can often enhance the investigation of IS phenomena ‐ particularly when the construct under study is multi‐dimensional. This paper explores the challenges and benefits of carrying out IS research with a multi‐disciplinary team. By way of illustration a study is described which purposefully pulled together researchers from different (but related) disciplines to carry out an IS research project. The challenges confronting the team included miscommunication, initial disagreement concerning research constructs, and the amount of time required for meetings. The benefits far outweighed the difficulties. Benefits accrued to the study itself and to the research participants. The study was more holistic and included better construct definition. The participating researchers benefited from critically examining their own views and outlooks whilst being exposed to viewpoints from other disciplines.

Details

Journal of Systems and Information Technology, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1328-7265

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1999

Jeanette K. van Akkeren and Angèle L.M. Cavaye

The adoption of Internet technologies by the small business sector is important to their on‐going survival. Yet, given the opportunities and benefits that Internet technologies…

Abstract

The adoption of Internet technologies by the small business sector is important to their on‐going survival. Yet, given the opportunities and benefits that Internet technologies can provide it has been shown that Australian small businesses are relatively slow in adopting them. This paper develops a model from recent literature on the facilitators and inhibitors to the adoption of Internet technologies by small business. Cross‐case analysis of findings from three case studies are presented. Findings indicate that perceived lack of business benefit, mistrust of the IT industry and lack of understanding of Internet technologies are major inhibitors to Internet adoption by small business.

Details

Journal of Systems and Information Technology, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1328-7265

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2002

Chad Perry, Angele Cavaye and Len Coote

Most research about relationships and networks concentrates on social bonds such as trust and commitment. Little research considers technical bonds and how they interact with…

3308

Abstract

Most research about relationships and networks concentrates on social bonds such as trust and commitment. Little research considers technical bonds and how they interact with social bonds within a relationship. Thus this research investigates how technical bonds of information technology link with social bonds in the relationship between two organisations in a business system, in particular, between a franchisor and franchisees within a franchise system. First, a framework of the structure of a relationship between business alliance partners was synthesised from the business‐to‐business literature. Then Australian franchisors were surveyed about the effects of their investments in information technology upon their franchisor‐franchisee relationship. Structural equation modelling techniques were used to analyse the survey data. The results provided support for the framework, with the franchisor’s increased technical competence from information technology improving the social bonds in a relationship but those bonds being secondary to further technical investment. An implication for managers is that investments in information technology operate through the social bonds within their business.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 6 October 2015

Jonathan Garnett and Angele Cavaye

Recognition of prior learning (RPL) is a process by which both formal learning for recognised awards, informal learning from experience and non-formal learning for uncertificated…

13911

Abstract

Purpose

Recognition of prior learning (RPL) is a process by which both formal learning for recognised awards, informal learning from experience and non-formal learning for uncertificated but planned learning is given academic recognition. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper refers to international developments in RPL and then focuses upon the extensive and innovative use of RPL by Middlesex University and the developing RPL work at the Australian Institute of Business.

Findings

The Middlesex experience of recognition of learning from experience as part of the development of customised work-based learning programmes demonstrates the potential of RPL for business and management programmes.

Originality/value

The use of RPL for admission and/or credit in standard programmes enables individuals to have their work-based knowledge acknowledged as relevant, worthwhile and equivalent to learning obtained in the higher education classroom.

Details

Journal of Work-Applied Management, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2205-2062

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 February 2005

Bernd Carsten Stahl

E‐Teaching as the use of information and communication technology (ICT) in education is of growing importance for educational theory and practice. Many universities and other…

Abstract

E‐Teaching as the use of information and communication technology (ICT) in education is of growing importance for educational theory and practice. Many universities and other higher education institutions use ICT to support teaching. However, there are contradicting opinions about the value and outcome of e‐teaching. This paper starts with a review of the literature on e‐teaching and uses this as a basis for distilling success factors for e‐teaching. It then discusses the case study of an e‐voting system used for giving student feedback and marking student presentations. The case study is critically discussed in the light of the success factors developed earlier. The conclusion is that e‐teaching, in order to be successful, should be embedded in the organisational and individual teaching philosophy.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 6 October 2015

Selva Abraham and Jonathan Garnett

687

Abstract

Details

Journal of Work-Applied Management, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2205-2062

Book part
Publication date: 4 August 2008

Xavier Gabriëls and Ann Jorissen

This chapter investigates if and how the introduction of an Enterprise Resource Planning System (ERPS) influences the information characteristics quality, timeliness and…

Abstract

This chapter investigates if and how the introduction of an Enterprise Resource Planning System (ERPS) influences the information characteristics quality, timeliness and complexity. Subsequently we analyze whether the influence of an ERPS adoption on these information characteristics has an impact on the perceived value of information available for performance measurement (PM) purposes. On the basis of the extant literature a structural model is developed which tries to capture the direct and indirect effects of the degree of ERPS adoption on the perceived value of the information available for PM.

Details

Performance Measurement and Management Control: Measuring and Rewarding Performance
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-571-0

Book part
Publication date: 24 July 2020

Ashiya Abdool Satar

This chapter provides a theoretical and empirical examination of young people’s role in identifying and solving problems in their communities from a social justice perspective…

Abstract

This chapter provides a theoretical and empirical examination of young people’s role in identifying and solving problems in their communities from a social justice perspective. The complex political processes in South Africa stymie a top-down approach for advancing social justice. Therefore, this study focuses on a bottom-up stance to nurture social justice efforts by concentrating on the role of the youth, younger than 18 years, in initiating change in their communities. Such engagement aligns with the principles outlined in the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child adopted in 1989 that aims to enrich both the individual and the community (Dirsuweit & Mohamed, 2016; Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, 1989). The University of South Africa is involved in a community outreach program of this nature, commissioned by Empowervate Trust, a South African non-profit organization that manages the Youth Citizen’s Action Campaign (Y-CAP), which equips learners with the skills to solve societal issues in their respective communities. This chapter thus attempts to clarify what active citizenship means to the youth, by focusing on the findings from focus-group interviews with South African learners who are involved with community development projects that advance social justice initiatives in their communities through the Y-CAP endeavor.

Article
Publication date: 5 October 2010

Ajith Nayar and Srikanth Beldona

Since the advent of non‐proprietary technologies fostered by the internet, the travel distribution model has been subjected to significant changes. One of the primary changes has…

1584

Abstract

Purpose

Since the advent of non‐proprietary technologies fostered by the internet, the travel distribution model has been subjected to significant changes. One of the primary changes has been the expanding potential of interoperability between systems brought about the advent of extended markup language‐based specifications developed and published by the Open Travel Alliance (OTA). The potential impact of the underlying technology (web services) in use for developing these standards is significant. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate strategic perspectives from key industry players over the potential of this technology and examine the factors pertaining to their adoption.

Design/methodology/approach

Data for this came from a series of 30‐45‐minute interviews with senior executives of four major travel suppliers (included three major hotel chains and one leading car rental company) as well as three major intermediaries (comprised two global distribution system companies and one major online travel agency). Interviews were guided using two types of signposts – conceptual and industry‐level phenomena.

Findings

Findings indicate that suppliers and intermediaries see distinctive levers of advantage from OTA messaging specifications. While suppliers seek to build flexibility to add/delete channels and subsequently leverage greater control over inventory distribution, intermediaries seek to consolidate on their aggregation capabilities through wider content and enhance dynamic packaging as value for end‐customers.

Research limitations/implications

This is a qualitative study comprising in‐depth interviews with a selected few respondents that limit the generalizability of the results. Additionally, the perspective is limited to the larger players in the travel distribution space.

Originality/value

The study is the first in hospitality/travel marketing literature to examine the issues of interoperability specific to a major initiative such as the OTA.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 22 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 July 2010

Bharat Maheshwari, Vinod Kumar and Uma Kumar

The institutionalization of an organizational innovation, such as an enterprise resource planning (ERP) system, takes place as a continuous adaptation process that includes the…

1908

Abstract

Purpose

The institutionalization of an organizational innovation, such as an enterprise resource planning (ERP) system, takes place as a continuous adaptation process that includes the development of a support organization, infrastructure, regulations, and norms, as well as the acquired knowledge of the organizational members. This paper aims to provide a structured road map for understanding this complex process and to explain some of the critical issues in institutionalizing ERP in the organization.

Design/methodology/approach

Multiple case studies were employed as the research approach. A multiphase design was used to introduce structure to the methodology.

Findings

The paper, using a reasonably representative sample, provides valuable insights into the ERP institutionalization process within organizations. It identifies and documents a number of key challenges that organizations face in the three phases of the institutionalization process.

Practical implications

A number of findings from the paper may help managers in successfully institutionalizing ERP systems. The paper identifies 15 key activities and several challenges in executing those activities along with coping strategies that firms employed to face these challenges.

Originality/value

ERP systems mark a major shift in the organizational approach to information systems. The paper uses empirical data from case studies to explore and delineate the ERP institutionalization process in the adopting organizations.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

1 – 10 of 21