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Article
Publication date: 5 March 2018

Trudie Walters and Andrea Insch

To date, the importance of smaller, local community events in the place branding process has been overlooked in the place branding and event studies literature – yet they…

Abstract

Purpose

To date, the importance of smaller, local community events in the place branding process has been overlooked in the place branding and event studies literature – yet they are recognised as a means of increasing the attractiveness of a place for residents, through building a sense of community and contributing to quality of life. The purpose of this paper is to make clear the contribution of community event narratives to place branding.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative approach was adopted. The public narratives of a portfolio of 14 community events (from event websites, press releases and media discourse, local government strategic policy documents) were examined. An inductive thematic analysis was conducted, and a visual framework for analysing and discussing the findings was created.

Findings

Community event narratives provide a useful resource that could be drawn upon by place branding practitioners to reach potential new residents who share similar ideals as local residents. The findings from this study demonstrate that local community event narratives do indeed tell “stories about who we are”.

Practical implications

This paper has implications for place branding initiatives seeking to attract new residents, particularly where there is a sense of fear and resistance from residents about “outsiders” moving in.

Originality/value

This paper presents an alternative model to the traditional city branding campaigns that seek to attract new residents, in the form of a values-based event-led branding strategy that may be more appropriate and compatible with local stakeholder goals.

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

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Article
Publication date: 10 April 2017

Andrea Insch, Damien Mather and John Knight

The purpose of this paper is to investigate consumer willingness to pay a premium for domestically manufactured products in the context of a buy-national campaign and the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate consumer willingness to pay a premium for domestically manufactured products in the context of a buy-national campaign and the role of congruity in determining that willingness.

Design/methodology/approach

A market-stall-like context was used to conduct a stated-preference choice modelling experiment in six major cities in Australia and New Zealand. Participants were asked to choose one of three country-source alternatives for each of three product categories on display (muesli bars, toilet paper and a merino wool garment) with and without “Buy Australian Made” or “Buy New Zealand Made” stickers. A total sample of 2,160 consumers participated.

Findings

Strong evidence for the existence of buy-made-in effects for the muesli bar and toilet paper categories was found at the 95 per cent confidence level. Domestically made toilet paper attracted a premium in Australia (10 per cent) but a discount in New Zealand (5 per cent). Consumers in both countries indicated their willingness to pay a 14 per cent premium for domestically made muesli bars.

Research limitations/implications

This research design, which aimed to achieve a high level of ecological validity, precluded direct quantitative measurement of product category-COO schema congruency in the same experiment, either before or after the choice experiments. Future studies in other countries and product categories would benefit from surveying a separate sample of the same populations to directly estimate cross-population differences in COO “extreme affect” and product-COO congruence to strengthen the untangling of possibly confounding effects.

Practical implications

Brand managers, retail sector organisations and governments may need to reconsider the rationale for participating in buy-national campaigns, given the lack of generalisability of buy-made-in price premiums.

Originality/value

This paper is a rare example of an experiment to test whether consumers are willing to pay a premium for domestically made products in the context of a buy-national campaign.

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Article
Publication date: 6 June 2016

Emma Hoksbergen and Andrea Insch

The purpose of this paper is to address the need to understand how younger music festival-goers use and engage with a music festival’s Facebook page, and how they perceive…

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2588

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address the need to understand how younger music festival-goers use and engage with a music festival’s Facebook page, and how they perceive this social networking service (SNS) as a potential on-line platform for value co-creation.

Design/methodology/approach

Face-to-face in-depth interviews were conducted with 16 young adults who attended an annual New Year’s Eve music festival, Rhythm and Vines, in Gisborne, New Zealand.

Findings

Analysis of the interview data revealed that the majority of participants did not actively engage with this platform and could be categorised as passive viewers or information-seekers. In addition, participants perceived five types of value from using this SNS: functional, social, emotional, interactive and aesthetic value. Even though participants were not segmented due to the small sample size, patterns in their levels of engagement with Facebook, attendance status, reasons for attending the festival and the combinations of forms of value that they perceived were identified.

Research limitations/implications

Future research should use a large-scale survey method to obtain a representative sample that is generalisable to a specific population of music festival-goers.

Practical implications

Dominance of features on Facebook providing festival-goers with functional value suggests they prefer a passive or co-optation approach to value co-creation in this context. Due to the limited extent of participants actively co-creating value on this platform, alternative means of encouraging interaction to co-create value with festival-goers should be investigated.

Originality/value

This study demonstrates that this SNS provides this group of young adults with a means to connect their real-time festival experience, with their on-line Facebook social network during the year.

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

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Article
Publication date: 7 October 2013

Andrea Insch and Benjamin Sun

The purpose of this study was threefold: to identify which attributes of the host university city are important to students; to assess students' satisfaction with the key…

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2228

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was threefold: to identify which attributes of the host university city are important to students; to assess students' satisfaction with the key attributes of their host university city; and to determine the drivers of students' overall satisfaction with their host university city.

Design/methodology/approach

A two stage, mixed methods research design was selected for this study. Focus groups comprised the first stage and a survey of 159 full time university students attending the university of Otago in Dunedin, New Zealand, comprised the second stage.

Findings

The survey findings indicate that students at the university of Otago perceive accommodation, socialising and sense of community, safety and cultural scene as the most important attributes of their host university city. Alternatively, the results of the regression analysis which assessed the relative strength of city attributes in explaining their overall satisfaction with Dunedin, demonstrated that shopping and dining, appeal and vibrancy, socialising and sense of community and public transport were the key drivers of their overall satisfaction with the city.

Research limitations/implications

Students' overall satisfaction with the city is relatively positive and they are most satisfied with socialising and sense of community, community assets, and the city's natural environment. Overall, students' expectations of the city's attributes were reached and exceeded. However, their satisfaction with accommodation, the attribute that they ranked as the most important, was unmet. This shortfall in expectations has the potential to negatively impact the university's image and encourage students to transfer somewhere else for further study if their most important need is not addressed.

Practical implications

As an important city stakeholder for university cities, students' perceptions and satisfaction with their host city need to be given priority. University administrators in collaboration with city place managers should put effort into maintaining the city attributes which are important to students and which drive their satisfaction with the city experience, since they represent a large proportion of residents in university host cities. The consequences of their inattention to students' needs could be harmful in the long-term.

Originality/value

Tertiary student perceptions and satisfaction with their host cities have been largely ignored. This study addresses this gap by identifying which attributes of cities are important to students, gauging students' perception of their host city according to these attributes, and identifying the city attributes driving their satisfaction with their host city.

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 August 2011

Andrea Insch

The purpose of this paper is to extend the concept of green brands to destinations and to examine the application and limitations of green destination brands for nations…

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4030

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to extend the concept of green brands to destinations and to examine the application and limitations of green destination brands for nations adopting this positioning strategy.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper identifies characteristics of green destination brands, drawing on established concepts in corporate branding, destination branding and green marketing. The paper demonstrates the application and limitations of the concept through an in‐depth case study analysis of New Zealand's destination brand to explain the possibilities and problems of building green destination brands at a national level.

Findings

The findings suggest that a holistic, strategic approach to building a green destination brand which emphasizes and qualifies the green essence of a nation's brand is required to avoid the pitfalls, cynicism and criticisms of greenwashing.

Research limitations/implications

The research findings are embedded in the context studied – New Zealand's destination brand. Additional case studies at multiple levels – nations, regions, cities – would offer a rich database to gain a better understanding of the concept and the implications of green destination branding.

Practical implications

Barriers to executing a credible green destination brand position are identified and the implications for destination marketing organizations and their stakeholders are discussed.

Originality/value

A conceptualization of green destination brands is provided and the application and limitations of the concept are demonstrated through an in‐depth case study of a nation that has adopted this positioning strategy. Rather than taking a snapshot research approach, a historical perspective enabled the development of the destination's brand positioning strategy to be captured.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2014

Andrea Insch and Erin Jackson

This study aimed to investigate consumers' understanding of country of origin (CoO) information and its relative importance in the context of their everyday food purchase…

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2412

Abstract

Purpose

This study aimed to investigate consumers' understanding of country of origin (CoO) information and its relative importance in the context of their everyday food purchase decisions.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional intercept survey of 402 consumers in two cities in New Zealand was conducted. Respondents were asked to describe what they had considered when selecting a food item in their trolley. This was followed by questions to assess respondents' knowledge of CoO and their use and understanding of common CoO labels.

Findings

Price (42 per cent), taste (40 per cent), health (18 per cent), and quality (18 per cent) were the most important factors that respondents mentioned. Only 3.5 per cent of respondents mentioned CoO as one of the factors influencing their decision. Of respondents 61 per cent, when prompted, stated that they knew the CoO of the food product selected. Of these respondents, 90 per cent were correct. Of respondents 62 per cent stated that they look at CoO labels when making food purchase decisions. Yet, only one third of respondents correctly understood the difference between the “Made in” and “Product of” labels.

Research limitations/implications

The findings suggest that consumers that do access CoO labels are misinterpreting this information which may form the basis of their assumptions about the source of origin of the brands and food products they routinely purchase.

Practical implications

Mandatory CoO labelling policies may add costs and reinforce misconceptions that consumers already hold about the meaning of these labels.

Originality/value

This study contributes to understanding of the extent to which consumers are competent in their knowledge and understanding of these informational labels.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 116 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2015

Andrea Insch and Menique Stuart

The purpose of this paper is to identify the factors underlying residents’ lack of involvement and engagement with their city brand. This paper addresses the gap in…

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1224

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the factors underlying residents’ lack of involvement and engagement with their city brand. This paper addresses the gap in understanding residents’ disengagement from their city brand.

Design/methodology/approach

In-depth interviews with 14 residents of Dunedin City, New Zealand, were conducted to identify and understand the factors that underlie residents’ disengagement from their city brand. The interviews were transcribed and analysed using thematic analysis.

Findings

Four major themes or factors that influence residents’ disengagement were identified: lack of brand awareness/knowledge; lack of brand identification; disapproval of local government actions; and cynical attitudes towards involvement.

Research limitations/implications

This paper focuses on one city brand, with its unique history and institutional context, and the thoughts and experiences of a limited group of residents, thus limiting the applicability of the findings. A longitudinal study would be helpful to identify if residents’ engagement with their place brand change over time and the underlying reasons for such changes.

Practical implications

Extant research highlights the importance of a participatory, co-creative process between citizens and local governments for building city brands. Despite this, this study’s findings demonstrate that there might be several formidable barriers to resident participation in their city’s branding process.

Originality/value

This paper represents a first step in understanding what might trigger or contribute to residents becoming disengaged from their city’s brand. Therefore, this paper considers the “hidden voices” of residents who have become largely disconnected from the city brand.

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

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Book part
Publication date: 4 December 2018

Gisela Alves, Arnaldo Coelho and Vítor Roque

Many destination marketers organise events to draw economic benefits over the short and long term. However, this chapter suggests that events can result in more than…

Abstract

Many destination marketers organise events to draw economic benefits over the short and long term. However, this chapter suggests that events can result in more than economic benefits, as they can be used to improve a destination’s branding and image. The authors explain how the organisation and implementation of successful events can enhance the destination’s attributes. They explore the consumer-based brand equity (CBBE) of the event and examine its relationship with other variables, including the destination’s image. Moreover, they maintain that music festivals can enhance the destination’s image and branding, particularly, when the visitors share their positive experiences with others. The authors make reference to two Portuguese events: NOS Primavera Sound event and NOS ALIVE. In conclusion, they imply that such music events are improving the brand equity among customers and adding value to the destination marketing of Portugal.

Details

The Branding of Tourist Destinations: Theoretical and Empirical Insights
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-373-9

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Article
Publication date: 24 April 2009

Andrea Insch and Magdalena Florek

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the prevalence and types of country associations on product labels and packages across a range of grocery product categories.

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2982

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the prevalence and types of country associations on product labels and packages across a range of grocery product categories.

Design/methodology/approach

An audit of New Zealand and Australian country associations as they appeared on products in 26 categories was conducted in a major New Zealand supermarket outlet.

Findings

The results of the content analysis of 788 brands revealed that the majority featured at least one country of origin (COO) association and indicated that they were either “made in” New Zealand or Australia.

Research limitations/implications

Even though the findings are potentially restricted to the New Zealand context, this paper provides evidence of the prevalence of common and distinctive country associations across a diverse range of product categories. This suggests that these associations are still relevant to grocery manufacturers and supermarket retailers as a way of positioning their branded products.

Practical implications

The findings offer supermarket retailer buyers and regulatory agencies insight into the use of COO associations from the perspective of FMCG manufacturers. In addition, the findings provide FMCG manufacturers with an indication of the prevalence of different country associations in the categories that they compete.

Originality/value

In spite of debate about the costs and benefits of COO labelling and place references on grocery product packaging, little is known about how these associations are actually used by FMCG manufacturers. This paper addresses this question by auditing brands on the supermarket shelf.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 37 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 25 January 2008

Andrea Insch

The purpose of this paper is to identify and explain the triggers and processes of value creation in Australia's chicken meat supply chains. This industry was chosen as…

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1821

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify and explain the triggers and processes of value creation in Australia's chicken meat supply chains. This industry was chosen as the critical case due to the rapid rise in poultry meat consumption in western markets. This study addresses the lack of understanding about the transformation of agri‐food supply chains to provide a chronological and historical explanation of patterns of value creation in this industry.

Design/methodology/approach

A historical case study approach was chosen. Multiple primary and secondary sources were collated and analysed to describe events in narrative form.

Findings

Analysis of the patterns of value creation revealed four major phases in the evolution of Australia's chicken meat supply chains. In each phase a dominant form of value creation was identified and the triggers that facilitated the transition between phases are described.

Research limitations/implications

As the study is confined to a single industry, further research in other settings is needed to verify the patterns described. Since agri‐food supply chains are dynamic they should be continuously monitored to identify trends that resemble previous triggers and processes, or manifest as novel ones.

Originality/value

This study takes a historical perspective to identify the triggers and patterns of value creation in Australia's chicken meat supply chains. A schema of phases of value creation is offered that can potentially be applied by practitioners in other industries to diagnose the possible outcomes of prior events and actions by supply chain members.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 110 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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